Theatre

theaterstagetheatricaltheatre companytheatre artstheater companytheaterstheatrestheater artslive theatre
Theatre or theater is a collaborative form of fine art that uses live performers, typically actors or actresses, to present the experience of a real or imagined event before a live audience in a specific place, often a stage.wikipedia
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Actor

actressfilm actorfilm actress
Theatre or theater is a collaborative form of fine art that uses live performers, typically actors or actresses, to present the experience of a real or imagined event before a live audience in a specific place, often a stage.
The actor performs "in the flesh" in the traditional medium of the theatre or in modern media such as film, radio, and television.

Theatre of ancient Greece

theatreancient Greek theatreGreek
Modern Western theatre comes, in large measure, from the theatre of ancient Greece, from which it borrows technical terminology, classification into genres, and many of its themes, stock characters, and plot elements. The theatre of ancient Greece consisted of three types of drama: tragedy, comedy, and the satyr play.
The ancient Greek drama was a theatrical culture that flourished in ancient Greece from 700 BC. The city-state of Athens, which became a significant cultural, political, and military power during this period, was its center, where it was institutionalised as part of a festival called the Dionysia, which honored the god Dionysus.

Fine art

fine artsfine artistfine
Theatre or theater is a collaborative form of fine art that uses live performers, typically actors or actresses, to present the experience of a real or imagined event before a live audience in a specific place, often a stage.
Historically, the five main fine arts were painting, sculpture, architecture, music, and poetry, with performing arts including theatre and dance.

Musical theatre

musicalmusicalsmusical comedy
Modern theatre includes performances of plays and musical theatre. Through the 19th century, the popular theatrical forms of Romanticism, melodrama, Victorian burlesque and the well-made plays of Scribe and Sardou gave way to the problem plays of Naturalism and Realism; the farces of Feydeau; Wagner's operatic Gesamtkunstwerk; musical theatre (including Gilbert and Sullivan's operas); F. C. Burnand's, W. S. Gilbert's and Oscar Wilde's drawing-room comedies; Symbolism; proto-Expressionism in the late works of August Strindberg and Henrik Ibsen; and Edwardian musical comedy.
Musical theatre is a form of theatrical performance that combines songs, spoken dialogue, acting and dance.

Performing arts

performerperforming artmusic
Theatre artist Patrice Pavis defines theatricality, theatrical language, stage writing and the specificity of theatre as synonymous expressions that differentiate theatre from the other performing arts, literature and the arts in general.
Theatre, music, dance and object manipulation, and other kinds of performances are present in all human cultures.

Opera

opera singeroperasoperatic
The art forms of ballet and opera are also theatre and use many conventions such as acting, costumes and staging. Through the 19th century, the popular theatrical forms of Romanticism, melodrama, Victorian burlesque and the well-made plays of Scribe and Sardou gave way to the problem plays of Naturalism and Realism; the farces of Feydeau; Wagner's operatic Gesamtkunstwerk; musical theatre (including Gilbert and Sullivan's operas); F. C. Burnand's, W. S. Gilbert's and Oscar Wilde's drawing-room comedies; Symbolism; proto-Expressionism in the late works of August Strindberg and Henrik Ibsen; and Edwardian musical comedy.
Opera (English plural: operas; Italian plural: opere ) is a form of theatre in which music has a leading role and the parts are taken by singers, but is distinct from musical theater.

The arts

artscreative artsart
Theatre artist Patrice Pavis defines theatricality, theatrical language, stage writing and the specificity of theatre as synonymous expressions that differentiate theatre from the other performing arts, literature and the arts in general.
Major constituents of the arts include literature (including drama, poetry, and prose), performing arts (among them dance, music, and theatre), and visual arts (including drawing, painting, filmmaking, architecture, ceramics, sculpting, and photography).

Play (theatre)

playplaysstage play
Modern theatre includes performances of plays and musical theatre. The two styles were differentiated by the method of making the puppets and the positioning of the rods on the puppets, as opposed to the type of play performed by the puppets.
A play is a form of literature written by a playwright, usually consisting of dialogue and singing between characters, intended for theatrical performance rather than just reading.

Drama

dramasdramatic artsFamily Drama
The theatre of ancient Greece consisted of three types of drama: tragedy, comedy, and the satyr play.
Drama is the specific mode of fiction represented in performance: a play, opera, mime, ballet, etc, performed in a theatre, or on radio or television.

Street theatre

street theaterstreet play(street)
The theatre of ancient Rome was a thriving and diverse art form, ranging from festival performances of street theatre, nude dancing, and acrobatics, to the staging of Plautus's broadly appealing situation comedies, to the high-style, verbally elaborate tragedies of Seneca.
Street theatre is a form of theatrical performance and presentation in outdoor public spaces without a specific paying audience.

Tetralogy

tetralogiesfour-part seriesquartets
As contestants in the City Dionysia's competition (the most prestigious of the festivals to stage drama) playwrights were required to present a tetralogy of plays (though the individual works were not necessarily connected by story or theme), which usually consisted of three tragedies and one satyr play.
The name comes from the Attic theater, in which a tetralogy was a group of three tragedies followed by a satyr play, all by one author, to be played in one sitting at the Dionysia as part of a competition.

Dramatic theory

theoreticaltheorist
More than 130 years later, the philosopher Aristotle analysed 5th-century Athenian tragedy in the oldest surviving work of dramatic theory—his Poetics (c. 335 BCE).
Dramatic theory is a term used for works that attempt to form theories about theatre and drama.

Dialogue

dialogdialoguesspoken dialogue
The ancient Vedas (hymns from between 1500 and 1000 BCE that are among the earliest examples of literature in the world) contain no hint of it (although a small number are composed in a form of dialogue) and the rituals of the Vedic period do not appear to have developed into theatre.
Dialogue (sometimes spelled dialog in American English ) is a written or spoken conversational exchange between two or more people, and a literary and theatrical form that depicts such an exchange.

Acting

actoractressacted
It addresses acting, dance, music, dramatic construction, architecture, costuming, make-up, props, the organisation of companies, the audience, competitions, and offers a mythological account of the origin of theatre.
Acting is an activity in which a story is told by means of its enactment by an actor or actress who adopts a character—in theatre, television, film, radio, or any other medium that makes use of the mimetic mode.

Puppetry

puppet showpuppet theatrepuppet shows
This task was thought of as being analogous to that of a puppeteer—the literal meaning of "sutradhara" is "holder of the strings or threads".
Puppetry is a form of theatre or performance that involves the manipulation of puppets – inanimate objects, often resembling some type of human or animal figure, that are animated or manipulated by a human called a puppeteer.

Aeschylus

ÆschylusAischylosAeschylean
We have complete texts extant by Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides.
The inscription on Aeschylus's gravestone makes no mention of his theatrical renown, commemorating only his military achievements:

Costume design

costumecostumingCostume Designer
It addresses acting, dance, music, dramatic construction, architecture, costuming, make-up, props, the organisation of companies, the audience, competitions, and offers a mythological account of the origin of theatre.
Costumes may be for a theater, cinema, or musical performance but may not be limited to such.

Commedia dell'arte

commedia dell’artecommediacommedia del arte
Theatre took on many alternate forms in the West between the 15th and 19th centuries, including commedia dell'arte and melodrama.
Commedia is a form of theatre characterized by masked "types" which began in Italy in the 16th century and was responsible for the advent of actresses (Isabella Andreini ) and improvised performances based on sketches or scenarios.

Puppet

puppetspuppet theaterpuppet theatre
The two styles were differentiated by the method of making the puppets and the positioning of the rods on the puppets, as opposed to the type of play performed by the puppets.
Puppetry is a very ancient form of theatre which dates back to the 5th century BC in Ancient Greece.

Patrice Pavis

Pavis, Patrice
Theatre artist Patrice Pavis defines theatricality, theatrical language, stage writing and the specificity of theatre as synonymous expressions that differentiate theatre from the other performing arts, literature and the arts in general.
Patrice Pavis was previously Professor of Theatre Studies at Paris VIII University.

Nineteenth-century theatre

19th-century19th century19th-century theatre
Through the 19th century, the popular theatrical forms of Romanticism, melodrama, Victorian burlesque and the well-made plays of Scribe and Sardou gave way to the problem plays of Naturalism and Realism; the farces of Feydeau; Wagner's operatic Gesamtkunstwerk; musical theatre (including Gilbert and Sullivan's operas); F. C. Burnand's, W. S. Gilbert's and Oscar Wilde's drawing-room comedies; Symbolism; proto-Expressionism in the late works of August Strindberg and Henrik Ibsen; and Edwardian musical comedy.
Nineteenth-century theatre describes a wide range of movements in the theatrical culture of Europe and the United States in the 19th century.

Seyler Theatre Company

theatrical companyfamed theatrical companySeylersche Schauspiel-Gesellschaft
The major promoter of the idea of the national theatre in Germany, and also of the Sturm und Drang poets, was Abel Seyler, the owner of the Hamburgische Entreprise and the Seyler Theatre Company.
The Seyler Theatre Company, also known as the Seyler Company (German: Seylersche Schauspiel-Gesellschaft, sometimes Seylersche Truppe), was a theatrical company founded in 1769 by Abel Seyler, a Hamburg businessman originally from Switzerland who became "the leading patron of German theatre" in his lifetime.

Farce

farcicalfarcesfarceur
Through the 19th century, the popular theatrical forms of Romanticism, melodrama, Victorian burlesque and the well-made plays of Scribe and Sardou gave way to the problem plays of Naturalism and Realism; the farces of Feydeau; Wagner's operatic Gesamtkunstwerk; musical theatre (including Gilbert and Sullivan's operas); F. C. Burnand's, W. S. Gilbert's and Oscar Wilde's drawing-room comedies; Symbolism; proto-Expressionism in the late works of August Strindberg and Henrik Ibsen; and Edwardian musical comedy.
In theatre, a farce is a comedy that aims at entertaining the audience through situations that are highly exaggerated, extravagant, and thus improbable.

Realism (theatre)

realismrealisticrealist
Through the 19th century, the popular theatrical forms of Romanticism, melodrama, Victorian burlesque and the well-made plays of Scribe and Sardou gave way to the problem plays of Naturalism and Realism; the farces of Feydeau; Wagner's operatic Gesamtkunstwerk; musical theatre (including Gilbert and Sullivan's operas); F. C. Burnand's, W. S. Gilbert's and Oscar Wilde's drawing-room comedies; Symbolism; proto-Expressionism in the late works of August Strindberg and Henrik Ibsen; and Edwardian musical comedy.
Realism in the theatre was a general movement that began in the 19th-century theatre, around the 1870s, and remained present through much of the 20th century.

Hamburg National Theatre

Deutsches NationaltheaterHamburg National Theater
The major promoter of the idea of the national theatre in Germany, and also of the Sturm und Drang poets, was Abel Seyler, the owner of the Hamburgische Entreprise and the Seyler Theatre Company.
The Hamburg Enterprise (Hamburgische Entreprise), commonly known as the Hamburg National Theatre, was a theatre company in Hamburg (now Germany), that existed 1767–1769 at the Gänsemarkt square.