Theft

thiefthievesstealingpetty theftgrand theftstolenstealfelony theftthieveryheist
In common usage, theft is the taking of another person's property or services without that person's permission or consent with the intent to deprive the rightful owner of it.wikipedia
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Burglary

breaking and enteringburglariescat burglar
The word is also used as an informal shorthand term for some crimes against property, such as burglary, embezzlement, larceny, looting, robbery, shoplifting, library theft, and fraud (obtaining money under false pretenses).
Usually that offence is theft, but most jurisdictions include others within the ambit of burglary.

Crime

criminalcriminalscriminal offence
The word is also used as an informal shorthand term for some crimes against property, such as burglary, embezzlement, larceny, looting, robbery, shoplifting, library theft, and fraud (obtaining money under false pretenses).
The notion that acts such as murder, rape, and theft are to be prohibited exists worldwide.

Embezzlement

embezzlingembezzledembezzle
The word is also used as an informal shorthand term for some crimes against property, such as burglary, embezzlement, larceny, looting, robbery, shoplifting, library theft, and fraud (obtaining money under false pretenses). This offence replaces the former offences of larceny, embezzlement and fraudulent conversion.
Embezzlement is the act of withholding assets for the purpose of conversion (theft) of such assets, by one or more persons to whom the assets were entrusted, either to be held or to be used for specific purposes.

Shoplifting

shopliftershopliftshoplifted
The word is also used as an informal shorthand term for some crimes against property, such as burglary, embezzlement, larceny, looting, robbery, shoplifting, library theft, and fraud (obtaining money under false pretenses).
Shoplifting is the unnoticed theft of goods from an open retail establishment.

Robbery

armed robberyrobberiesrobber
The word is also used as an informal shorthand term for some crimes against property, such as burglary, embezzlement, larceny, looting, robbery, shoplifting, library theft, and fraud (obtaining money under false pretenses).
According to common law, robbery is defined as taking the property of another, with the intent to permanently deprive the person of that property, by means of force or fear; that is, it is a larceny or theft accomplished by an assault.

Library theft

Document theftbook and document thiefbook theft at libraries
The word is also used as an informal shorthand term for some crimes against property, such as burglary, embezzlement, larceny, looting, robbery, shoplifting, library theft, and fraud (obtaining money under false pretenses).
Theft from libraries of books, historical documents, maps and other materials from libraries is a significant problem.

Larceny

grand larcenypetty larcenylarcenies
The word is also used as an informal shorthand term for some crimes against property, such as burglary, embezzlement, larceny, looting, robbery, shoplifting, library theft, and fraud (obtaining money under false pretenses). This offence replaces the former offences of larceny, embezzlement and fraudulent conversion.
The crime of larceny has been abolished in England and Wales, Northern Ireland, and the Republic of Ireland due to breaking up the generalised crime of larceny into the specific crimes of burglary, robbery, fraud, theft, and related crimes.

Conversion (law)

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Note that there may be civil liability for the torts of trespass to chattels or conversion in either eventuality.
Its equivalents in criminal law include larceny or theft and criminal conversion.

Mistake (criminal law)

mistake of factmistakemistaken
For example, if X goes to a restaurant and, by mistake, takes Y's scarf instead of her own, she has physically deprived Y of the use of the property (which is the actus reus) but the mistake prevents X from forming the mens rea (i.e., because she believes that she is the owner, she is not dishonest and does not intend to deprive the "owner" of it) so no crime has been committed at this point.
Since the defendant honestly believes that he has become the owner of goods in a sale transaction, he cannot form the mens rea for theft (which is usually dishonesty) when he physically removes them from the store.

Theft by finding

But if she realises the mistake when she gets home and could return the scarf to Y, she will steal the scarf if she dishonestly keeps it (see theft by finding).
Since theft is the unlawful taking of another person's property, an essential element of the actus reus of theft is absent.

Property crime

offence against propertyproperty crimesMailbox baseball
Theft is an offence against property for the purposes of section 3 of the Visiting Forces Act 1952.
Property crime is a category of crime, usually involving private property, that includes, among other crimes, burglary, larceny, theft, motor vehicle theft, arson, shoplifting, and vandalism.

Theft Act 1968

Theft Acts
In England and Wales, theft is a statutory offence, created by section 1(1) of the Theft Act 1968.
The Theft Act 1968 resulted from the efforts of the Criminal Law Revision Committee to reform the English law of theft.

Criminal Justice (Theft and Fraud Offences) Act, 2001

Criminal Justice (Theft and Fraud Offences) Act 2001
Theft is a statutory offence, created by section 4(1) of the Criminal Justice (Theft and Fraud Offences) Act, 2001.

Dishonesty

dishonestdishonestlydebtor's dishonesty
The actus reus of theft is usually defined as an unauthorized taking, keeping, or using of another's property which must be accompanied by a mens rea of dishonesty and the intent permanently to deprive the owner or rightful possessor of that property or its use.

Property

propertiesproprietarypatrimony
In common usage, theft is the taking of another person's property or services without that person's permission or consent with the intent to deprive the rightful owner of it.
* Theft

Criminal conversion

fraudulent conversionconversionconvert
This offence replaces the former offences of larceny, embezzlement and fraudulent conversion.
It differs from theft in that it does not include the element of intending to deprive the owner of permanent possession of that property.

Motor vehicle theft

auto theftcar theftgrand theft auto
In some states, grand theft of a vehicle may be charged as "grand theft auto" (see motor vehicle theft for more information).
Motor vehicle theft (also called car theft and, in the United States, grand theft auto) is the criminal act of stealing or attempting to steal a motor vehicle.

Theft Act (Northern Ireland) 1969

In Northern Ireland, theft is a statutory offence, created by section 1 of the Theft Act (Northern Ireland) 1969.
This section creates the offence of theft.

Credit card fraud

skimmingfraudcredit card skimming
Credit card fraud is a wide-ranging term for theft and fraud committed using or involving a payment card, such as a credit card or debit card, as a fraudulent source of funds in a transaction.

Anti-theft system

anti-theftantitheftTheft prevention
Theft is one of the most common and oldest criminal behaviours.

Felony

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Most commonly, the penological consequences of the distinction include the significant one that grand theft can be treated as a felony, while petty theft is generally treated as a misdemeanor.

Fence (criminal)

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The fence acts as a middleman between thieves and the eventual buyers of stolen goods who may not be aware that the goods are stolen.

Misdemeanor

misdemeanourpetty crimemisdemeanors
Most commonly, the penological consequences of the distinction include the significant one that grand theft can be treated as a felony, while petty theft is generally treated as a misdemeanor.
Depending on the jurisdiction, examples of misdemeanors may include: petty theft, prostitution, public intoxication, simple assault, disorderly conduct, trespass, vandalism, reckless driving, discharging a firearm within city limits, possession of cannabis and in some jurisdictions first-time possession of certain other drugs, and other similar crimes.

Taxation as theft

opposition to taxation in itselftaxation is theftanti-tax
The position that taxation is theft, and therefore immoral, is a viewpoint found in a number of radical political philosophies.