Thelema

ThelemicThelemiteThelemitesDo what thou wiltDo What Thou Wilt Shall Be The Whole Of The LawFeast for LifeFeast of the Second Day of the Writing of the Book of the LawEquinox of the Gods/New YearFeast for Death of Aleister CrowleyFeast of the First Day of the Writing of the Book of the Law
Thelema is a social or spiritual philosophy derived from Western esotericism.wikipedia
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Aleister Crowley

CrowleyCrowley, Aleister Aleister Crowley: The Beast 666
Thelema was developed in the early 1900s by Aleister Crowley, an English writer, mystic, and ceremonial magician.
He founded the religion of Thelema, identifying himself as the prophet entrusted with guiding humanity into the Æon of Horus in the early 20th century.

Aeon (Thelema)

Aeon of HorusAeonÆon of Horus
He believed himself to be the prophet of a new age, the Æon of Horus, based upon a spiritual experience that he and his wife, Rose Edith, had in Egypt in 1904.
In the religion of Thelema, it is believed that the history of humanity can be divided into a series of aeons (also written æons), each of which was accompanied by its own forms of "magical and religious expression".

True Will

Will
In the Thelemic model, each person has a "True Will" and, insofar as each person acts in accordance with his or her Will, the nature of a person's interactions with the world, or cosmos or nature, is a form of love or harmony.
True Will is a term found within the mystical system of Thelema, a magical society founded in 1904 with Aleister Crowley's writing of The Book of the Law.

Nuit

Nuit (Thelema)
The Thelemic pantheon—a collection of gods and goddesses who either literally exist or serve as symbolic archetypes or metaphors, depending one's viewpoint—includes a number of deities, primarily a trio adapted from ancient Egyptian religion, who are the three speakers of The Book of the Law: Nuit, Hadit and Ra-Hoor-Khuit.
Nuit (alternatively Nu, Nut, or Nuith) is a goddess in Thelema, the speaker in the first Chapter of The Book of the Law, the sacred text written or received in 1904 by Aleister Crowley.

Hadit

Had
The Thelemic pantheon—a collection of gods and goddesses who either literally exist or serve as symbolic archetypes or metaphors, depending one's viewpoint—includes a number of deities, primarily a trio adapted from ancient Egyptian religion, who are the three speakers of The Book of the Law: Nuit, Hadit and Ra-Hoor-Khuit.
Hadit (sometimes Had) refers to a Thelemic deity.

Ceremonial magic

ritual magicmagicianceremonial magician
Thelema was developed in the early 1900s by Aleister Crowley, an English writer, mystic, and ceremonial magician.
Popularized by the Hermetic Order of the Golden Dawn, it draws on such schools of philosophical and occult thought as Hermetic Qabalah, Enochian magic, Thelema, and the magic of various grimoires.

Chaos magic

Inhibitory gnosisChaos MagickChaote
Aspects of Thelema and Crowley's thought in general inspired the development of Wicca and, to a certain degree, the rise of Modern Paganism as a whole, as well as chaos magick and Satanism.
Chaos magic differs from other occult traditions such as Thelema or Wicca in that it rejects the existence of absolute truth, and views all occult systems as arbitrary symbol-systems that are only effective because of the belief of the practitioner.

Scientology and the occult

Crowley's ideas influenced some of Hubbard's workScientology
Some scholars, such as Hugh Urban, also believe Thelema to have been an influence on the development of Scientology, but others, such as J. Gordon Melton, deny any such connection.
In 1945–46, Hubbard was briefly involved with and defrauded Jack Parsons, an American rocketry pioneer who was also a devoted Thelemite and member of the Agape Lodge of Aleister Crowley's magical order, Ordo Templi Orientis, in Pasadena, California.

Modern Paganism

NeopaganNeopaganismneo-pagan
Aspects of Thelema and Crowley's thought in general inspired the development of Wicca and, to a certain degree, the rise of Modern Paganism as a whole, as well as chaos magick and Satanism.
On the eclectic side has been placed Wicca, Thelema, Adonism, Druidry, the Goddess Movement, Discordianism and the Radical Faeries.

Hellfire Club

Hell Fire ClubThe Hellfire ClubHell-Fire Club
In the mid-18th century, Sir Francis Dashwood inscribed the adage on a doorway of his abbey at Medmenham, where it served as the motto of the Hellfire Club.
The club motto was Fais ce que tu voudras (Do what thou wilt), a philosophy of life associated with François Rabelais' fictional abbey at Thélème and later used by Aleister Crowley.

Wicca

WiccanWiccansEclectic Wicca
Aspects of Thelema and Crowley's thought in general inspired the development of Wicca and, to a certain degree, the rise of Modern Paganism as a whole, as well as chaos magick and Satanism.
Some spell it "magick", a variation coined by the influential occultist Aleister Crowley, though this spelling is more commonly associated with Crowley's religion of Thelema than with Wicca.

Ordo Templi Orientis

O.T.O.OTOO.T.O
Ordo Templi Orientis Grand Lodge has stated:
Originally it was intended to be modelled after and associated with European Freemasonry, such as Masonic Templar organizations, but under the leadership of Aleister Crowley, O.T.O. was reorganized around the Law of Thelema as its central religious principle.

Ecclesia Gnostica Catholica

Gnostic Catholic ChurchGnostic churchSaints of Ecclesia Gnostica Catholica
Rabelais is included among the Saints of Ecclesia Gnostica Catholica.
It is the ecclesiastical arm of the Ordo Templi Orientis (O.T.O.), an international fraternal initiatory organization devoted to promulgating the Law of Thelema.

Hermetic Order of the Golden Dawn

Golden DawnOrder of the Golden DawnThe Golden Dawn
Evans says this may result from the fact that "both Farr and Crowley were thoroughly steeped in Golden Dawn imagery and teachings", and that Crowley probably knew the ancient materials that inspired some of Farr's motifs.
Many present-day concepts of ritual and magic that are at the centre of contemporary traditions, such as Wicca and Thelema, were inspired by the Golden Dawn, which became one of the largest single influences on 20th-century Western occultism.

Babalon

Scarlet WomanThe Scarlet Womaninfluenced
Other deities within the cosmology of Thelema are Hoor-paar-kraat (or Harpocrates), god of silence and inner strength, the brother of Ra-Hoor-Khuit, Babalon, the goddess of all pleasure, known as the Virgin Whore, and Therion, the beast that Babalon rides, who represents the wild animal within man, a force of nature.
Babalon (also known as the Scarlet Woman, Great Mother or Mother of Abominations) is a goddess found in the occult system of Thelema, which was established in 1904 with English author and occultist Aleister Crowley's writing of The Book of the Law, her name being later given in other works.

Great Work (Hermeticism)

Great WorkThe Great Workmagnum opus
The spiritual quest to find what you are meant to do and do it is also known in Thelema as the Great Work.
The term Great Work (magnum opus) is a term used in Hermeticism and occult traditions descended from it, most prominently Thelema.

Therion (Thelema)

666 (Thelema)Therionnumber holding religious significance
Other deities within the cosmology of Thelema are Hoor-paar-kraat (or Harpocrates), god of silence and inner strength, the brother of Ra-Hoor-Khuit, Babalon, the goddess of all pleasure, known as the Virgin Whore, and Therion, the beast that Babalon rides, who represents the wild animal within man, a force of nature.
Therion (θηρίον, beast) is a deity found in the mystical system of Thelema, which was established in 1904 with Aleister Crowley's writing of The Book of the Law.

Heru-ra-ha

Ra-Hoor-KhuitHoor-Paar-KraatRa Hoor Khuit
The Thelemic pantheon—a collection of gods and goddesses who either literally exist or serve as symbolic archetypes or metaphors, depending one's viewpoint—includes a number of deities, primarily a trio adapted from ancient Egyptian religion, who are the three speakers of The Book of the Law: Nuit, Hadit and Ra-Hoor-Khuit.
Heru-ra-ha (literally "Horus sun-flesh", among other possible meanings) is a composite deity within Thelema, a religion that began in 1904 with Aleister Crowley and his Book of the Law.

Holy Guardian Angel

geniusguardian angelHigher or Divine Genius
Crowley claims that he took dictation from an entity named Aiwass, whom he later identified as his own Holy Guardian Angel.
Later, author and occultist Aleister Crowley popularized the term within his religious and philosophical system of Thelema.

Ankh-ef-en-Khonsu i

Ankh-af-na-khonsuAnkh-f-n-khonsu
This brief statement called simply "The Comment" warns against discussing the book's contents, and states that all "questions of the Law are to be decided only by appeal to my writings" and is signed Ankh-af-na-khonsu.
Among practitioners of the modern religion of Thelema, he is best known under the name of Ankh-af-na-khonsu, and as the dedicant of the Stele of Revealing, a wooden offering stela made to ensure his continued existence in the Netherworld now located in the Egyptian Museum in Cairo.

Western esotericism

esotericesotericismesotericist
Thelema is a social or spiritual philosophy derived from Western esotericism. Thelema has also occasionally been described as an esoteric, ethical, ideological, magical (or magickal), mystical, occultic, or paranormal social system or schema of beliefs or concepts.
One of the most prominent members of that order was Aleister Crowley (1875–1947), who went on to proclaim the religion of Thelema and become a prominent member of the Ordo Templi Orientis.

Magick (Book 4)

Magick in Theory and PracticeBook 4Magick : Liber ABA, Book Four, Parts I-IV
Crowley wrote in his Magick, Liber ABA, Book 4, that IAO is "the principal and most characteristic formula of Osiris, of the Redemption of Mankind. "I" is Isis, Nature, ruined by "A", Apophis the Destroyer, and restored to life by the Redeemer Osiris."
Magick, Liber ABA, Book 4 is widely considered to be the magnum opus of 20th-century occultist Aleister Crowley, the founder of Thelema.

Magick (Thelema)

magickmagicalmagickal
Thelema has also occasionally been described as an esoteric, ethical, ideological, magical (or magickal), mystical, occultic, or paranormal social system or schema of beliefs or concepts.
Magick, in the context of Aleister Crowley's Thelema, is a term used to show and differentiate the occult from performance magic and is defined as "the Science and Art of causing Change to occur in conformity with Will", including both "mundane" acts of will as well as ritual magic.

Aiwass

AiwazOIVZ
Crowley claims that he took dictation from an entity named Aiwass, whom he later identified as his own Holy Guardian Angel. By his account, a possibly non-corporeal or "praeterhuman" being that called itself Aiwass contacted him through Rose and dictated, through Rose, a text known as The Book of the Law or Liber AL vel Legis, which outlined the principles of Thelema.
To Crowley's astonishment and delight, it was OIVZ, which equated to 93, the number of Thelema itself, and "also that of the Lost Word of freemasonry, which I had re-discovered".

The Holy Books of Thelema

Holy Books of ThelemaHoly BooksThe Holy Books of Thelema (Equinox III:9)
As Crowley developed the religion, he wrote widely on the topic, as well as producing more "inspired" writings that he collectively termed The Holy Books of Thelema.
Aleister Crowley, the founder of Thelema, designated his works as belonging to one of several classes.