Theodor Schwann

SchwannTheodore SchwannTheodor Ambrose Hubert SchwannSchwann, Theodor
Theodor Schwann ( 7 December 1810 – 11 January 1882) was a German physician and physiologist.wikipedia
136 Related Articles

Schwann cell

Schwann cellsSchwannschwann cell transplant
Other contributions include the discovery of Schwann cells in the peripheral nervous system, the discovery and study of pepsin, the discovery of the organic nature of yeast, and the invention of the term metabolism.
Schwann cells or neurolemmocytes (named after german physiologist Theodor Schwann) are the principal glia of the peripheral nervous system (PNS).

Cell theory

steady-state membrane pump
His most significant contribution to biology is considered to be the extension of cell theory to animals.
This is usually credited to Matthias Schleiden and Theodor Schwann.

Biology

biologicalBiological Sciencesbiologist
His most significant contribution to biology is considered to be the extension of cell theory to animals.
Then, in 1838, Schleiden and Schwann began promoting the now universal ideas that (1) the basic unit of organisms is the cell and (2) that individual cells have all the characteristics of life, although they opposed the idea that (3) all cells come from the division of other cells.

Yeast

yeastsbrewer's yeastbudding yeast
Other contributions include the discovery of Schwann cells in the peripheral nervous system, the discovery and study of pepsin, the discovery of the organic nature of yeast, and the invention of the term metabolism. Next Schwann studied yeast and fermentation.
Theodor Schwann recognized them as fungi in 1837.

Matthias Jakob Schleiden

Matthias SchleidenSchleidenMatthias Jacob Schleiden
His work complemented that of Matthias Jakob Schleiden in plants and was informed by it; the two were close friends.
Matthias Jakob Schleiden was a German botanist and co-founder of cell theory, along with Theodor Schwann and Rudolf Virchow.

Pepsin

pepsinogenpep''sinpepsin a
Other contributions include the discovery of Schwann cells in the peripheral nervous system, the discovery and study of pepsin, the discovery of the organic nature of yeast, and the invention of the term metabolism.
It was discovered in 1836 by Theodor Schwann.

Organism

organismsflora and faunaliving organisms
Other contributions include the discovery of Schwann cells in the peripheral nervous system, the discovery and study of pepsin, the discovery of the organic nature of yeast, and the invention of the term metabolism.
The cell theory, first developed in 1839 by Schleiden and Schwann, states that all organisms are composed of one or more cells; all cells come from preexisting cells; and cells contain the hereditary information necessary for regulating cell functions and for transmitting information to the next generation of cells.

Dreikönigsgymnasium

College of the Three CrownsJesuit GymnasiumMarzellengymnasium
Theodor Schwann studied at the Dreikönigsgymnasium (also known as the Tricoronatum or Three Kings School), a Jesuit school in Cologne.

Catholic University of Leuven (1834–1968)

Catholic University of LeuvenCatholic University of LouvainUniversity of Louvain
Instead, in 1839, Schwann accepted the chair of anatomy at the Université Catholique de Louvain in Leuven, Belgium, another Catholic city.

Physiology

physiologistphysiologicalphysiologically
Theodor Schwann ( 7 December 1810 – 11 January 1882) was a German physician and physiologist. While at Bonn, Schwann met and worked with physiologist Johannes Peter Müller.
In the 19th century, physiological knowledge began to accumulate at a rapid rate, in particular with the 1838 appearance of the Cell theory of Matthias Schleiden and Theodor Schwann.

Neuss

NovaesiumNeuss, GermanyNeuss am Rhein
Theodor Schwann was born in Neuss on 7 December 1810 to Leonard Schwann and Elisabeth Rottels.

Johannes Peter Müller

J. P. MüllerMüllerJohannes Müller
While at Bonn, Schwann met and worked with physiologist Johannes Peter Müller.
Müller mentored such distinguished scientists and physiologists as Hermann von Helmholtz, Emil du Bois-Reymond, Theodor Schwann, Friedrich Gustav Jakob Henle, Ernst Wilhelm Brücke, Carl Ludwig and Ernst Haeckel.

Friedrich Traugott Kützing

KützingKütz.Kütz
His work on yeast was independent of work done by Charles Cagniard de la Tour and Friedrich Traugott Kützing, all of whom published work in 1837.
Also, independent of Charles Cagniard-Latour (1777–1859) and Theodor Schwann (1810–1882), he was among the first to provide comprehensive answers in regard to yeast and the role it played in fermentation.

Cell (biology)

cellcellscellular
Dining with Schwann one day, their conversation turned on the nuclei of plant and animal cells.
Cell theory, first developed in 1839 by Matthias Jakob Schleiden and Theodor Schwann, states that all organisms are composed of one or more cells, that cells are the fundamental unit of structure and function in all living organisms, and that all cells come from pre-existing cells.

University of Liège

Université de LiègeUniversity of LiegeLiège
In 1848, Schwann's compatriot Antoine Frédéric Spring convinced him to transfer to the University of Liège, also in Belgium.

Louis Pasteur

PasteurPasteur, LouisPasteurian
The value of Schwann's work on fermentation eventually would be recognized by Louis Pasteur, ten years later.
In the 1830s, Charles Cagniard-Latour, Friedrich Traugott Kützing and Theodor Schwann used microscopes to study yeasts and concluded that yeasts were living organisms.

Rudolf Virchow

VirchowRudolph VirchowRudolf Ludwig Karl Virchow
Biologists would eventually accept the view of pathologist Rudolf Virchow, who popularized the maxim Omnis cellula e cellula—that every cell arises from another cell—in 1857.
His most widely known scientific contribution is his cell theory, which built on the work of Theodor Schwann.

Fermentation

fermentedfermentfermenting
Next Schwann studied yeast and fermentation.
In 1837, Charles Cagniard de la Tour, Theodor Schwann and Friedrich Traugott Kützing independently published papers concluding, as a result of microscopic investigations, that yeast is a living organism that reproduces by budding.

Spontaneous generation

spontaneously generatedspontaneously generatesarise spontaneously
This was strong evidence against the theory of spontaneous generation, the idea that living organisms could develop out of nonliving matter.
In 1837, Charles Cagniard de la Tour, a physicist, and Theodor Schwann, one of the founders of cell theory, published their independent discovery of yeast in alcoholic fermentation.

Liebig–Pasteur dispute

Pasteur, not Schwann, would challenge Liebig's views in the Liebig–Pasteur dispute.
Charles Cagniard-Latour, Theodor Schwann and Friedrich Traugott Kützing identified independently yeast as a living organism that nourishes itself by the sugar it ferments, a process which referred to the ethanol fermentation (alcoholic fermentation).

Germany

GermanGERFederal Republic of Germany
Theodor Schwann ( 7 December 1810 – 11 January 1882) was a German physician and physiologist.

Peripheral nervous system

peripheralperipheral nervesPNS
Other contributions include the discovery of Schwann cells in the peripheral nervous system, the discovery and study of pepsin, the discovery of the organic nature of yeast, and the invention of the term metabolism.

Metabolism

metabolicmetabolizedmetabolic pathways
Other contributions include the discovery of Schwann cells in the peripheral nervous system, the discovery and study of pepsin, the discovery of the organic nature of yeast, and the invention of the term metabolism.

Goldsmith

goldsmithinggoldsmithsgold
Leonard Schwann was a goldsmith and later a printer.