Theodore Judah

Theodore D. JudahTheodore Dehone JudahJudahT.D. Judah
Theodore Dehone Judah (March 4, 1826 – November 2, 1863) was an American railroad and civil engineer who was a central figure in the original promotion, establishment, and design of the First Transcontinental Railroad.wikipedia
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First Transcontinental Railroad

transcontinental railroadPacific Railroadrailroad
Theodore Dehone Judah (March 4, 1826 – November 2, 1863) was an American railroad and civil engineer who was a central figure in the original promotion, establishment, and design of the First Transcontinental Railroad.
Theodore Judah was a fervent supporter of the central route railroad.

Central Pacific Railroad

Central PacificCentral Pacific RailwayCentral Pacific Railroad Company
He found investors for what became the Central Pacific Railroad (CPRR).
Planned by Theodore Judah, the Central Pacific Railroad was authorized by Congress in 1862.

Sacramento Valley Railroad (1852–1877)

Sacramento Valley RailroadSacramento Valley Railroad (1852–77)
Judah was hired in 1854 at age 28 as the Chief Engineer for the Sacramento Valley Railroad in California.
He left for New York to find expertise and private funds for the railroad effort; he recruited a young survey engineer Theodore D. Judah from New York to come west with him to Sacramento.

Collis Potter Huntington

Collis P. HuntingtonCollis HuntingtonC. P. Huntington
Failing to raise funds for the Central Pacific project in San Francisco, Judah succeeded in signing up four Sacramento merchants, later known as the "Big Four": Leland Stanford, Collis P. Huntington, Mark Hopkins, and Charles Crocker.
Collis Potter Huntington (October 22, 1821 – August 13, 1900) was one of the Big Four of western railroading (along with Leland Stanford, Mark Hopkins, and Charles Crocker) who invested in Theodore Judah's idea to build the Central Pacific Railroad as part of the first U.S. transcontinental railroad.

Mark Hopkins Jr.

Mark HopkinsMark Hopkins, Jr.Hopkins
Failing to raise funds for the Central Pacific project in San Francisco, Judah succeeded in signing up four Sacramento merchants, later known as the "Big Four": Leland Stanford, Collis P. Huntington, Mark Hopkins, and Charles Crocker.
He was one of four principal investors that funded Theodore D. Judah's idea of building a railway over the Sierra Nevada from Sacramento, California to Promontory, Utah.

Dutch Flat, California

Dutch Flat
That Fall, with the help of Daniel W. Strong, a storekeeper in Dutch Flat, California, Judah found a practical trans-Sierra railroad route.
In 1859 Dr. Daniel Strong of Dutch Flat invited railroad surveyor (later, chief engineer of the Central Pacific Railroad) Theodore Judah to come and evaluate a possible route across the Sierra Nevada mountains.

Charles Crocker

CrockerCharles F. CrockerCrocker, Charles
Failing to raise funds for the Central Pacific project in San Francisco, Judah succeeded in signing up four Sacramento merchants, later known as the "Big Four": Leland Stanford, Collis P. Huntington, Mark Hopkins, and Charles Crocker.
In 1861, after hearing an intriguing presentation by Theodore Judah, he was one of the four principal investors, along with Mark Hopkins, Collis Huntington and Leland Stanford (also known as The Big Four), who formed the Central Pacific Railroad, which constructed the western portion of the First Transcontinental Railroad in North America.

Leland Stanford

LelandAmasa Leland StanfordStanford
Failing to raise funds for the Central Pacific project in San Francisco, Judah succeeded in signing up four Sacramento merchants, later known as the "Big Four": Leland Stanford, Collis P. Huntington, Mark Hopkins, and Charles Crocker.
Stanford was one of the four merchants known popularly as "The Big Four" (or among themselves as "the Associates") who were the key investors in Chief Engineer Theodore Dehone Judah's plan for the Central Pacific Railroad, which the five of them incorporated on June 28, 1861, and of which Stanford was elected president.

Sacramento, California

SacramentoSacramento, CACity of Sacramento
Failing to raise funds for the Central Pacific project in San Francisco, Judah succeeded in signing up four Sacramento merchants, later known as the "Big Four": Leland Stanford, Collis P. Huntington, Mark Hopkins, and Charles Crocker.
Early home of the California Supreme Court and the location of the office of Theodore Judah, it also was the western terminus of the Pony Express.

Troy, New York

TroyTroy, NYTroy, N.Y.
After his family moved to Troy, New York, Judah attended Rensselaer Institute for a term and developed at a young age a passion for engineering and railroads.

T. D. Judah

T.D. JudahCP No. 4
It was named in honor of the railroad's first chief engineer, Theodore Dehone Judah, who had championed and surveyed a passable route over the Sierra Nevada for the Transcontinental Railroad.

Pacific Railroad Surveys

Pacific Railroad Surveya general reconnaissance of several possible routes that had been done earlierNorthern Pacific Railroad Exploration and Survey
On January 1857 in Washington DC, Judah published "A practical plan for building The Pacific Railroad", in which he outlined the general plan and argued for the need to do a detailed survey of a specific selected route for the railroad, not a general reconnaissance of several possible routes that had been done earlier.
In particular, railroad engineer Theodore Judah, on 1 January 1857 in Washington DC, published "A practical plan for building The Pacific Railroad", in which he outlined the general plan and argued for the need to do a detailed instrumental survey of a specific selected route for the railroad, not a general reconnaissance of several possible routes that had been done in the Pacific Railroad Surveys.

N Judah

NJudah StreetN-Judah
The N Judah is a Muni Metro light rail line in San Francisco, California, so named as it runs along Judah Street for much of its length, named after railroad engineer Theodore Judah.

Engineer

engineersconsulting engineerIr.
Theodore Dehone Judah (March 4, 1826 – November 2, 1863) was an American railroad and civil engineer who was a central figure in the original promotion, establishment, and design of the First Transcontinental Railroad.

Surveying

surveyorsurveyland surveyor
As chief engineer, he performed much of the land survey work to determine the best route for the railroad over the Sierra Nevada mountains, which was completed six years after his death.

Sierra Nevada (U.S.)

Sierra NevadaSierra Nevada MountainsSierra Nevada foothills
As chief engineer, he performed much of the land survey work to determine the best route for the railroad over the Sierra Nevada mountains, which was completed six years after his death.

Bridgeport, Connecticut

BridgeportBridgeport, CTBridgeport,
Theodore Judah was born in 1826 (perhaps 1825 ) in Bridgeport, Connecticut, the son of Mary (Reece) and The Rev. Henry Raymond Judah, an Episcopal clergyman.

Episcopal Church (United States)

EpiscopalEpiscopal ChurchEpiscopalian
Theodore Judah was born in 1826 (perhaps 1825 ) in Bridgeport, Connecticut, the son of Mary (Reece) and The Rev. Henry Raymond Judah, an Episcopal clergyman.

Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute

RPIRensselaerRensselaer Polytechnic
After his family moved to Troy, New York, Judah attended Rensselaer Institute for a term and developed at a young age a passion for engineering and railroads.
These include the visionary of the transcontinental railroad, Theodore Judah, Brooklyn Bridge engineer Washington Roebling, George Washington Gale Ferris Jr. (who designed and built the original Ferris Wheel) and Leffert L. Buck, the chief engineer of the Williamsburg Bridge in New York City.

Greenfield, Massachusetts

GreenfieldGreenfield, MACity of Greenfield
Theirs was the first wedding in the then new St James Episcopal Church of Greenfield, Massachusetts.

American Society of Civil Engineers

ASCEAmerican Society of Civil Engineers and ArchitectsAmerican Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE)
He was elected member of the American Society of Civil Engineers on May 1853; at that time there were fewer than 800 civil engineers in the United States.

Big Four (Central Pacific Railroad)

Big FourThe Big Foura consortium
Failing to raise funds for the Central Pacific project in San Francisco, Judah succeeded in signing up four Sacramento merchants, later known as the "Big Four": Leland Stanford, Collis P. Huntington, Mark Hopkins, and Charles Crocker.

Pacific Railroad Acts

Pacific Railroad ActPacific Railway ActPacific Railway Acts
On July 1, 1862, President Lincoln signed the Pacific Railroad Act into law, which authorized the issuance of land grants and U.S. bonds to CPRR and the newly chartered Union Pacific Railroad for the construction of a transcontinental railroad.

Union Pacific Railroad

Union PacificUnion Pacific RailwayUP
On July 1, 1862, President Lincoln signed the Pacific Railroad Act into law, which authorized the issuance of land grants and U.S. bonds to CPRR and the newly chartered Union Pacific Railroad for the construction of a transcontinental railroad.

Yellow fever

yellow fever virusyellow-feveryellow plague
Judah died of yellow fever on November 2, 1863.