Theodosius I

TheodosiusTheodosius the GreatTheodosianEmperor TheodosiusFlavius TheodosiusTheodosius "the GreatEmperor Theodosius ITheodosian edicts of 391Theodosius I the Greata Theodosius
Theodosius I (Flavius Theodosius Augustus; ; 11 January 347 – 17 January 395), also known as Theodosius the Great, was a Roman Emperor from 379 to 395, and the last emperor to rule over both the Eastern and the Western halves of the Roman Empire.wikipedia
790 Related Articles

Byzantine Empire

ByzantineByzantinesEastern Roman Empire
Theodosius I (Flavius Theodosius Augustus; ; 11 January 347 – 17 January 395), also known as Theodosius the Great, was a Roman Emperor from 379 to 395, and the last emperor to rule over both the Eastern and the Western halves of the Roman Empire.
Under Theodosius I (r. 379–395), Christianity became the Empire's official state religion and other religious practices were proscribed.

Western Roman Empire

Western EmpireWesternWest
Theodosius I (Flavius Theodosius Augustus; ; 11 January 347 – 17 January 395), also known as Theodosius the Great, was a Roman Emperor from 379 to 395, and the last emperor to rule over both the Eastern and the Western halves of the Roman Empire. From 364 to 375, the Roman Empire was governed by two co-emperors, the brothers Valentinian I and Valens; when Valentinian died in 375, his sons, Valentinian II and Gratian, succeeded him as rulers of the Western Roman Empire.
Some emperors, such as Constantine I and Theodosius I, governed as the sole Augustus across the Roman Empire.

Magnus Maximus

MaximusMaximianusMaxen Wledic
Theodosius I was obliged to fight two destructive civil wars, successively defeating the usurpers Magnus Maximus in 387-388 and Eugenius 394, not without material cost to the power of the Empire.
In 383, as commander of Britain, he usurped the throne against emperor Gratian, and by negotiation with emperor Theodosius I, he was made emperor in Britannia and Gaul the next year while Gratian's brother Valentinian II retained Italy, Pannonia, Hispania, and Africa.

State church of the Roman Empire

state religion of the Roman Empirestate religionChristianity
He issued decrees that effectively made Nicene Christianity the official state church of the Roman Empire.
With the Edict of Thessalonica in 380 AD, Emperor Theodosius I made Nicene Christianity the Empire's state religion.

Roman Empire

RomanRomansEmpire
Theodosius I (Flavius Theodosius Augustus; ; 11 January 347 – 17 January 395), also known as Theodosius the Great, was a Roman Emperor from 379 to 395, and the last emperor to rule over both the Eastern and the Western halves of the Roman Empire. By treaty, which followed his indecisive victory at the end of the Gothic War, they were established as foederati, autonomous allies of the Empire, south of the Danube, in Illyricum, within the Empire's borders.
Theodosius I, the last emperor to rule over both East and West, died in 395 AD after making Christianity the official religion of the empire.

Eugenius

Flavius EugeniusFlavius Eugenius Augustus
Theodosius I was obliged to fight two destructive civil wars, successively defeating the usurpers Magnus Maximus in 387-388 and Eugenius 394, not without material cost to the power of the Empire. After the death in 392 of Valentinian II, whom Theodosius had supported against a variety of usurpations, Theodosius ruled as sole Emperor, appointing his younger son Honorius Augustus as his co-ruler of the West (Milan, on 23 January 393) and by defeating the usurper Eugenius on 6 September 394, at the Battle of the Frigidus (Vipava river, modern Slovenia) he restored peace.
Flavius Eugenius (died 6 September 394) was a usurper in the western Roman Empire (392–394) against Emperor Theodosius I.

Honorius (emperor)

HonoriusEmperor HonoriusFlavius Honorius
After his death, Theodosius's young sons Arcadius and Honorius inherited the east and west halves of the empire respectively, and the Roman Empire was never again re-united, though Eastern Roman emperors after Zeno would claim the united title after Julius Nepos's death in 480. By his first wife, the probably Spanish Aelia Flaccilla Augusta, he had two sons, Arcadius and Honorius, and a daughter, Aelia Pulcheria; Arcadius was his heir in the East and Honorius in the West. After the death in 392 of Valentinian II, whom Theodosius had supported against a variety of usurpations, Theodosius ruled as sole Emperor, appointing his younger son Honorius Augustus as his co-ruler of the West (Milan, on 23 January 393) and by defeating the usurper Eugenius on 6 September 394, at the Battle of the Frigidus (Vipava river, modern Slovenia) he restored peace.
He was the younger son of emperor Theodosius I and his first wife Aelia Flaccilla, and brother of Arcadius, who was the Eastern Emperor from 395 until his death in 408.

Arcadius

Flavius ArcadiusArcadius the son of TheodosiusEmperor Arcadius
After his death, Theodosius's young sons Arcadius and Honorius inherited the east and west halves of the empire respectively, and the Roman Empire was never again re-united, though Eastern Roman emperors after Zeno would claim the united title after Julius Nepos's death in 480. By his first wife, the probably Spanish Aelia Flaccilla Augusta, he had two sons, Arcadius and Honorius, and a daughter, Aelia Pulcheria; Arcadius was his heir in the East and Honorius in the West.
He was the eldest son of Theodosius I and his first wife Aelia Flaccilla, and brother of the Western Emperor Honorius.

Ancient Olympic Games

Olympic GamesOlympicOlympics
In 393, he banned the pagan rituals of the Olympics in Ancient Greece.
The first Olympics is traditionally dated to 776 BC. They continued to be celebrated when Greece came under Roman rule, until the emperor Theodosius I suppressed them in AD393 as part of the campaign to impose Christianity as the State religion of Rome.

Roman emperor

EmperoremperorsEmperor of the Roman Empire
Theodosius I (Flavius Theodosius Augustus; ; 11 January 347 – 17 January 395), also known as Theodosius the Great, was a Roman Emperor from 379 to 395, and the last emperor to rule over both the Eastern and the Western halves of the Roman Empire.
The final period of co-emperorship began in 395, when Emperor Theodosius I's sons Arcadius and Honorius succeeded as co-emperors.

Count Theodosius

TheodosiusTheodosius the Eldera successful general
Flavius Theodosius was born in Cauca, Gallaecia, Hispania (according to Hydatius and Zosimus) or in Italica, Baetica, Hispania (according to Themistius, Claudius Claudianus, or Marcellinus Comes), to a senior military officer, Theodosius the Elder.
He is also known as Flavius Theodosius or as Theodosius the Elder, distinguishing him from his son, the Roman emperor Theodosius I.

Rome

RomanRomaRome, Italy
He dissolved the Order of the Vestal Virgins in Rome.
Christianity in the form of the Nicene Creed became the official religion of the empire in 380 via the Edict of Thessalonica issued in the name of three emperors – Gratian, Valentinian II, and Theodosius I – with Theodosius clearly the driving force behind it. He was the last emperor of a unified empire: after his death in 395 his sons, Arcadius and Honorius divided the empire into a western and an eastern part.

Italica

ItálicaItalyTalyata
Flavius Theodosius was born in Cauca, Gallaecia, Hispania (according to Hydatius and Zosimus) or in Italica, Baetica, Hispania (according to Themistius, Claudius Claudianus, or Marcellinus Comes), to a senior military officer, Theodosius the Elder.
It was the birthplace of Roman Emperor Trajan, most likely that of Hadrian and possibly that of Theodosius.

Themistius

ThemistiiThemistios
Flavius Theodosius was born in Cauca, Gallaecia, Hispania (according to Hydatius and Zosimus) or in Italica, Baetica, Hispania (according to Themistius, Claudius Claudianus, or Marcellinus Comes), to a senior military officer, Theodosius the Elder.
He flourished in the reigns of Constantius II, Julian, Jovian, Valens, Gratian, and Theodosius I; and he enjoyed the favour of all those emperors, notwithstanding their many differences, and the fact that he himself was not a Christian.

Vestal Virgin

Vestalvestal virginsVestals
He dissolved the Order of the Vestal Virgins in Rome.
The College of the Vestals was disbanded and the sacred fire extinguished in 394, by order of the Christian emperor Theodosius.

Aelia Flaccilla

Aelia Flavia FlaccillaFlacillaPlacilla the Empress
By his first wife, the probably Spanish Aelia Flaccilla Augusta, he had two sons, Arcadius and Honorius, and a daughter, Aelia Pulcheria; Arcadius was his heir in the East and Honorius in the West.
Aelia Flavia Flaccilla (31 March 356 – 386), was a Roman empress and first wife of the Roman Emperor Theodosius I.

Galla Placidia

PlacidiaAelia Galla PlacidiaEmpress Galla Placidia
Theodosius and Galla had a son, Gratian, born in 388 and who died young, and a daughter, Aelia Galla Placidia (392–450).
Aelia Galla Placidia (388 – 27 November 450), daughter of the Roman emperor Theodosius I, was regent to Valentinian III from 423 until his majority in 437, and a major force in Roman politics for most of her life.

Slovenia

🇸🇮SlovenianSlovene
After the death in 392 of Valentinian II, whom Theodosius had supported against a variety of usurpations, Theodosius ruled as sole Emperor, appointing his younger son Honorius Augustus as his co-ruler of the West (Milan, on 23 January 393) and by defeating the usurper Eugenius on 6 September 394, at the Battle of the Frigidus (Vipava river, modern Slovenia) he restored peace.
A crucial battle between Theodosius I and Eugenius took place in the Vipava Valley in 394.

Delphi

Delphic oracleOracle at DelphiOracle of Delphi
He neither prevented nor punished the destruction of prominent Hellenistic temples of classical antiquity, including the Temple of Apollo in Delphi and the Serapeum in Alexandria.
It was shut down during the persecution of pagans in the late Roman Empire by Theodosius I in 381 AD.

Valentinian II

ValentinianEmperor ValentinianEmperor Valentinian II
From 364 to 375, the Roman Empire was governed by two co-emperors, the brothers Valentinian I and Valens; when Valentinian died in 375, his sons, Valentinian II and Gratian, succeeded him as rulers of the Western Roman Empire.
In 378, their uncle, the Emperor Valens, was killed in battle with the Goths at Adrianople, and Gratian invited the general Theodosius to be emperor in the East.

Gothic War (376–382)

Gothic WarGothic War of 376–382Gothic Wars
By treaty, which followed his indecisive victory at the end of the Gothic War, they were established as foederati, autonomous allies of the Empire, south of the Danube, in Illyricum, within the Empire's borders.
For the events of the Gothic War between 379 and 382, there are few sources and accounts become more confused, especially concerning the rise of Theodosius I as the new Eastern Roman Emperor.

Zosimus

Zosismus
Flavius Theodosius was born in Cauca, Gallaecia, Hispania (according to Hydatius and Zosimus) or in Italica, Baetica, Hispania (according to Themistius, Claudius Claudianus, or Marcellinus Comes), to a senior military officer, Theodosius the Elder.
The first book sketches briefly the history of the early Roman emperors from Augustus to Diocletian (305); the second, third and fourth deal more fully with the period from the accession of Constantius Chlorus and Galerius to the death of Theodosius I; the fifth and sixth cover the period between 395 and 410, when Priscus Attalus was deposed; for this period, he is the most important surviving non-ecclesiastical source.

Hispania

SpainRomanRomans
Flavius Theodosius was born in Cauca, Gallaecia, Hispania (according to Hydatius and Zosimus) or in Italica, Baetica, Hispania (according to Themistius, Claudius Claudianus, or Marcellinus Comes), to a senior military officer, Theodosius the Elder.
It is a mother of judges and princes; it has given Trajan, Hadrian, and Theodosius to the Empire.

Massacre of Thessalonica

massacremassacre against the inhabitants of Thessalonicamassacred
The garrison commander was killed in the violence, so Theodosius ordered the Goths to kill all the spectators in the circus as retaliation; Theodoret, a contemporary witness to these events, reports:
The Massacre of Thessalonica was an atrocity carried out by Gothic troops under the Roman Emperor Theodosius I in 390 against the inhabitants of Thessalonica, who had risen in revolt against the Gothic troops.

Temple of Apollo (Delphi)

Temple of ApolloTemple of Apollo at Delphisanctuary
He neither prevented nor punished the destruction of prominent Hellenistic temples of classical antiquity, including the Temple of Apollo in Delphi and the Serapeum in Alexandria.
The temple survived until AD 390, when the Roman emperor Theodosius I silenced the oracle by destroying the temple and most of the statues and works of art in the name of Christianity.