Thigh

thighsmedial thighmid-thighs
In human anatomy, the thigh is the area between the hip (pelvis) and the knee.wikipedia
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Outline of human anatomy

Human AnatomyAnatomyList of anatomical topics
In human anatomy, the thigh is the area between the hip (pelvis) and the knee.

Pelvis

pelvicpelvic girdlehip
In human anatomy, the thigh is the area between the hip (pelvis) and the knee.
The pelvis (plural pelves or pelvises) is either the lower part of the trunk of the human body between the abdomen and the thighs (sometimes also called pelvic region of the trunk) or the skeleton embedded in it (sometimes also called bony pelvis, or pelvic skeleton).

Knee

knee injuryknee jointknees
In human anatomy, the thigh is the area between the hip (pelvis) and the knee. The head of the femur articulates with the acetabulum in the pelvic bone forming the hip joint, while the distal part of the femur articulates with the tibia and patella forming the knee.
In humans and other primates, the knee joins the thigh with the leg and consists of two joints: one between the femur and tibia (tibiofemoral joint), and one between the femur and patella (patellofemoral joint).

Human leg

leglegslower limb
Anatomically, it is part of the lower limb.
The human leg, in the general word sense, is the entire lower limb of the human body, including the foot, thigh and even the hip or gluteal region.

Femur

femorathigh bonefemoral
The single bone in the thigh is called the femur.
The femur (, pl. femurs or femora ), or thigh bone, is the proximal bone of the hindlimb in tetrapod vertebrates and of the human thigh.

Tibia

shinshin boneshinbone
The head of the femur articulates with the acetabulum in the pelvic bone forming the hip joint, while the distal part of the femur articulates with the tibia and patella forming the knee.
While the epiphyses are the two rounded extremities of the bone; an upper (also known as superior or proximal) closest to the thigh and a lower (also known as inferior or distal) closest to the foot.

Quadriceps femoris muscle

quadricepsquadriceps musclequadriceps femoris
Anterior compartment muscles of the thigh include sartorius, and the four muscles that comprise the quadriceps muscles- rectus femoris, vastus medialis, vastus intermedius and vastus lateralis.
The quadriceps femoris (, also called the quadriceps extensor, quadriceps or quads) is a large muscle group that includes the four prevailing muscles on the front of the thigh.

Sartorius muscle

sartoriusabductorsartorius (tailor's) muscle
Anterior compartment muscles of the thigh include sartorius, and the four muscles that comprise the quadriceps muscles- rectus femoris, vastus medialis, vastus intermedius and vastus lateralis.
It is a long, thin, superficial muscle that runs down the length of the thigh in the anterior compartment.

Vastus lateralis muscle

vastus lateralisexternuslateralis
Anterior compartment muscles of the thigh include sartorius, and the four muscles that comprise the quadriceps muscles- rectus femoris, vastus medialis, vastus intermedius and vastus lateralis.
The vastus lateralis, also called the is the largest and most powerful part of the quadriceps femoris, a muscle in the thigh.

Vastus medialis

Vastus medialis musclemedialismedialis muscles
Anterior compartment muscles of the thigh include sartorius, and the four muscles that comprise the quadriceps muscles- rectus femoris, vastus medialis, vastus intermedius and vastus lateralis.
The vastus medialis (vastus internus or teardrop muscle) is an extensor muscle located medially in the thigh that extends the knee.

Biceps femoris muscle

biceps femorisBicep femorisbiceps
Posterior compartment muscles of the thigh are the hamstring muscles, which include semimembranosus, semitendinosus, and biceps femoris.
The biceps femoris is a muscle of the thigh located to the posterior, or back.

Semimembranosus muscle

semimembranosus
Posterior compartment muscles of the thigh are the hamstring muscles, which include semimembranosus, semitendinosus, and biceps femoris.
The semimembranosus, so called from its membranous tendon of origin, is situated at the back and medial side of the thigh.

Semitendinosus muscle

semitendinosussemitendinosus tendon
Posterior compartment muscles of the thigh are the hamstring muscles, which include semimembranosus, semitendinosus, and biceps femoris.
The semitendinosus is a long superficial muscle in the back of the thigh.

Adductor magnus muscle

adductor magnusadductoradductor muscle
Medial compartment muscles are pectineus, adductor magnus, adductor longus and adductor brevis, and also gracilis.
The adductor magnus is a large triangular muscle, situated on the medial side of the thigh.

Pectineus muscle

pectineus
Medial compartment muscles are pectineus, adductor magnus, adductor longus and adductor brevis, and also gracilis.
The pectineus muscle (, from the Latin word pecten, meaning comb ) is a flat, quadrangular muscle, situated at the anterior (front) part of the upper and medial (inner) aspect of the thigh.

Rectus femoris muscle

rectus femorisknee extensorsproximal rectus femoris
Anterior compartment muscles of the thigh include sartorius, and the four muscles that comprise the quadriceps muscles- rectus femoris, vastus medialis, vastus intermedius and vastus lateralis.
The rectus femoris is situated in the middle of the front of the thigh; it is fusiform in shape, and its superficial fibers are arranged in a bipenniform manner, the deep fibers running straight (rectus) down to the deep aponeurosis.

Gracilis muscle

gracilisgracilis tendongraciloplasty
Medial compartment muscles are pectineus, adductor magnus, adductor longus and adductor brevis, and also gracilis.
The gracilis muscle (Latin for "slender") is the most superficial muscle on the medial side of the thigh.

Adductor longus muscle

adductor longusadductorlongus
Medial compartment muscles are pectineus, adductor magnus, adductor longus and adductor brevis, and also gracilis.
In the human body, the adductor longus is a skeletal muscle located in the thigh.

Femoral artery

femoralfemoral arteriessuperficial femoral artery
The arterial supply is by the femoral artery and the obturator artery.
The femoral artery is a large artery in the thigh and the main arterial supply to the thigh and leg.

Adductor brevis muscle

adductor brevisbrevisAdductores brevis
Medial compartment muscles are pectineus, adductor magnus, adductor longus and adductor brevis, and also gracilis.
The adductor muscle group is used pressing the thighs together to ride a horse, and kicking with the inside of the foot in soccer or swimming.

Anterior compartment of thigh

anterior compartmentanterior compartment of the thighanterior
The anterior compartment is one of the fascial compartments of the thigh that contains groups of muscles together with their nerves and blood supply.

Great saphenous vein

saphenous veinsaphenous veinsgreater saphenous vein
The venae perfortantes connect the deep and the superficial system, which consists of the saphenous veins (the site of varicose veins).
It is the longest vein in the body, running along the length of the lower limb, returning blood from the foot, leg and thigh to the deep femoral vein at the femoral triangle.

Fascia

superficial fasciafascialfasciae
In cross-section, the thigh is divided up into three separate compartments, divided by fascia, each containing muscles.
Likewise, the lower limbs can be divided into two segments – the leg and the thigh and these contain the fascial compartments of the leg and the fascial compartments of the thigh.

Hamstring

hamstringshamstring musclesHamstring injury
Posterior compartment muscles of the thigh are the hamstring muscles, which include semimembranosus, semitendinosus, and biceps femoris.
The three muscles of the posterior thigh (semitendinosus, semimembranosus, biceps femoris long & short head) flex (bend) the knee, while all but the short head of biceps femoris extend (straighten) the hip.

Obturator artery

anterior brancharteryposterior branch
The arterial supply is by the femoral artery and the obturator artery.
The posterior branch of the obturator artery is a small artery in the thigh and follows the posterior margin of the foramen and turns forward on the inferior ramus of the ischium, where it anastomoses with the anterior branch.