Thirteen Colonies

American coloniescoloniescolonial13 coloniesUnited ColoniesColonial AmericaBritish coloniesthirteen American coloniesthirteen British coloniesAmerica
The Thirteen Colonies, also known as the Thirteen British Colonies or the Thirteen American Colonies, were a group of colonies of Great Britain on the Atlantic coast of America founded in the 17th and 18th centuries which declared independence in 1776 and formed the United States of America.wikipedia
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United States Declaration of Independence

Declaration of IndependenceAmerican Declaration of IndependenceU.S. Declaration of Independence
The Thirteen Colonies, also known as the Thirteen British Colonies or the Thirteen American Colonies, were a group of colonies of Great Britain on the Atlantic coast of America founded in the 17th and 18th centuries which declared independence in 1776 and formed the United States of America.
The Declaration explained why the Thirteen Colonies at war with the Kingdom of Great Britain regarded themselves as thirteen independent sovereign states, no longer under British rule.

American Revolutionary War

Revolutionary WarAmerican War of IndependenceAmerican Revolution
This population included people subject to a system of slavery which was legal in all of the colonies prior to the American Revolutionary War.
The American Revolutionary War (1775–1783), also known as the American War of Independence, was a war between Great Britain and its Thirteen Colonies in North America which declared independence in July 1776 as the United States of America.

British America

English AmericaAmerican coloniesAmerica
They were part of Britain's possessions in the New World, which also included colonies in Canada, Florida, and the Caribbean.
These colonies were formally known as British America and the British West Indies before the Thirteen Colonies declared their independence in the American Revolutionary War (1775–1783) and formed the United States of America.

American Revolution

RevolutionRevolutionary WarRevolutionary
Grievances with the British government led to the American Revolution, in which the colonies collaborated in forming the Continental Congress. The Thirteen Colonies were complete with the establishment of the Province of Georgia in 1732, although the term "Thirteen Colonies" became current only in the context of the American Revolution.
The American Patriots in the Thirteen Colonies defeated the British in the American Revolutionary War (1775–1783) with the assistance of France, winning independence from Great Britain and establishing the United States of America.

Continental Congress

CongressContinental CongressmanDelegate to the Continental Congress
Grievances with the British government led to the American Revolution, in which the colonies collaborated in forming the Continental Congress.
The Continental Congress was initially a convention of delegates from a number of British American colonies at the height of the American Revolution, acted collectively for the people of the Thirteen Colonies that ultimately became the United States of America.

No taxation without representation

taxation without representationwithout representationa lack of colonial representation
These inter-colonial activities cultivated a sense of shared American identity and led to calls for protection of the colonists' "Rights as Englishmen", especially the principle of "no taxation without representation".
"No taxation without representation" is a political slogan originating during the 1700s that summarized one of 27 colonial grievances of the American colonists in the Thirteen Colonies, which was one of the major causes of the American Revolution.

Slavery in the colonial United States

slavesslaveslavery
This population included people subject to a system of slavery which was legal in all of the colonies prior to the American Revolutionary War.
Most slaves who were ultimately brought to the Thirteen British colonies — the Eastern seaboard of what later became the United States — were imported from the Caribbean, not directly from Africa.

Rights of Englishmen

rights as Englishmensuch rightsEnglish liberties
These inter-colonial activities cultivated a sense of shared American identity and led to calls for protection of the colonists' "Rights as Englishmen", especially the principle of "no taxation without representation".
In the 18th century, some of the colonists who objected to British rule in the British colonies in North America argued that their traditional rights as Englishmen were being violated.

Province of Georgia

GeorgiaColony of GeorgiaGeorgia colony
The Thirteen Colonies were complete with the establishment of the Province of Georgia in 1732, although the term "Thirteen Colonies" became current only in the context of the American Revolution.
It was the last of the thirteen original American colonies established by Great Britain in what later became the United States.

Province of Massachusetts Bay

MassachusettsMassachusetts BayProvince of Massachusetts
The Province of Massachusetts Bay was a crown colony in British America which became one of the thirteen original states of the United States from 1776 onward.

Colony of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations

Rhode IslandColony of Rhode IslandRhode Island Colony
Reformed Baptist preacher Roger Williams founded Providence Plantations which became the Colony of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations.
The Colony of Rhode Island and Providence Plantations was one of the original Thirteen Colonies established on the east coast of America, bordering the Atlantic Ocean.

Province of New York

New Yorkcolony of New YorkNew York Colony
As one of the middle Thirteen Colonies, New York achieved independence and worked with the others to found the United States.

Province of New Hampshire

New HampshireProvince of New-HampshireColony of New Hampshire
Other colonists settled to the north, mingling with adventurers and profit-oriented settlers to establish more religiously diverse colonies in New Hampshire and Maine.
In 1776 the province established an independent state and government, the State of New Hampshire, and joined with twelve other colonies to form the United States.

Province of Maryland

MarylandColony of MarylandMaryland colony
In 1632, King Charles I granted the charter for Province of Maryland to Cecil Calvert, 2nd Baron Baltimore.
The Province of Maryland was an English and later British colony in North America that existed from 1632 until 1776, when it joined the other twelve of the Thirteen Colonies in rebellion against Great Britain and became the U.S. state of Maryland.

Colony of Virginia

VirginiaVirginia Colonycolonial Virginia
The London Company established the Colony and Dominion of Virginia in 1607, the first permanently settled English colony on the continent.
After declaring independence from the Kingdom of Great Britain in 1775, before the Declaration of Independence was officially adopted, the Virginia colony became the Commonwealth of Virginia, one of the original thirteen states of the United States, adopting as its official slogan "The Old Dominion".

Proprietary colony

ProprietorsProprietaryproprietary colonies
The three forms of colonial government in 1776 were provincial (royal colony), proprietary, and charter.

Anne Hutchinson

Ann HutchinsonAnne (Marbury) HutchinsonAnne Marbury Hutchinson
In 1637, a second group including Anne Hutchinson established a second settlement on Aquidneck Island, also known as Rhode Island.
Hutchinson is a key figure in the history of religious freedom in England's American colonies and the history of women in ministry, challenging the authority of the ministers.

Georgia (U.S. state)

GeorgiaGAState of Georgia
Oglethorpe and other English philanthropists secured a royal charter as the Trustees of the colony of Georgia on June 9, 1732.
Founded in 1733 as a British colony, Georgia was the last and southernmost of the original Thirteen Colonies to be established.

First Great Awakening

Great AwakeningEvangelical Revivalevangelical awakening
In the 1740s, the Thirteen Colonies underwent the First Great Awakening.
The First Great Awakening (sometimes Great Awakening) or the Evangelical Revival was a series of Christian revivals that swept Britain and its Thirteen Colonies between the 1730s and 1740s.

Barbados

BarbadianBarbadoesBajan
The Dutch also engaged in the burgeoning Atlantic slave trade, supplying enslaved Africans to the English colonies in North America and Barbados.
By 1666 at least 12,000 white smallholders had been bought out, died, or left the island, many choosing to emigrate to Jamaica or the American Colonies (notably the Carolinas).

History of the Connecticut Constitution

Connecticut's Royal Charter of 1662Connecticut Chartera new constitution
Eleven of the thirteen colonies had drafted state constitutions by 1786, but Connecticut elected to continue operation under the Charter.

Albany Congress

Albany ConferenceAlbany ConventionAlbany Purchase of 1754
At the 1754 Albany Congress, Pennsylvania colonist Benjamin Franklin proposed the Albany Plan which would have created a unified government of the Thirteen Colonies for coordination of defense and other matters, but the plan was rejected by the leaders of most colonies.
The Albany Congress (June 19 – July 11, 1754), also known as the Albany Convention of 1754, was a meeting of representatives sent by the legislatures of seven of the thirteen British colonies in British America: Connecticut, Maryland, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New York, Pennsylvania, and Rhode Island.

Benjamin Franklin

Ben FranklinFranklinFranklin, Benjamin
At the 1754 Albany Congress, Pennsylvania colonist Benjamin Franklin proposed the Albany Plan which would have created a unified government of the Thirteen Colonies for coordination of defense and other matters, but the plan was rejected by the leaders of most colonies.
Franklin earned the title of "The First American" for his early and indefatigable campaigning for colonial unity, initially as an author and spokesman in London for several colonies.

Albany Plan

Albany Plan of UnionPlan of UnionAlbany Union
At the 1754 Albany Congress, Pennsylvania colonist Benjamin Franklin proposed the Albany Plan which would have created a unified government of the Thirteen Colonies for coordination of defense and other matters, but the plan was rejected by the leaders of most colonies.
The Albany Plan of Union was a plan to create a unified government for the Thirteen Colonies, suggested by Benjamin Franklin, then a senior leader (age 48) and a delegate from Pennsylvania, at the Albany Congress on July 10, 1754 in Albany, New York.

Sons of Liberty

Son of LibertyThe Sons of LibertyOrder of the Sons of Liberty
Trouble escalated over the tea tax, as Americans in each colony boycotted the tea, and those in Boston dumped the tea in the harbor during the Boston Tea Party in 1773 when the Sons of Liberty dumped thousands of pounds of tea into the water.
The Sons of Liberty was a secret revolutionary organization that was created in the Thirteen American Colonies to advance the rights of the European colonists and to fight taxation by the British government.