Thomas Braden

Tom Braden
Thomas Wardell Braden (February 22, 1917 – April 3, 2009) was an American CIA official, journalist — best remembered as the author of Eight Is Enough, which spawned a popular television program — and co-host of the CNN show Crossfire.wikipedia
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Crossfire (U.S. TV program)

CrossfireCrossfire (TV series)CNN ''Crossfire
Thomas Wardell Braden (February 22, 1917 – April 3, 2009) was an American CIA official, journalist — best remembered as the author of Eight Is Enough, which spawned a popular television program — and co-host of the CNN show Crossfire.
The concept began in 1978 when Tom Braden and Pat Buchanan co-hosted a radio show on then-NBC-owned WRC radio in Washington.

Greene, Iowa

Greene
Braden was born in Greene, Iowa, and died in Denver, Colorado.
Thomas Braden (1917–2009) author of the book Eight Is Enough that was the basis for the ABC show Eight Is Enough

Richard M. Bissell Jr.

Richard BissellDick BissellBissell
After the war, Braden taught English for a time at Dartmouth (where he met Robert Frost), then moved to Washington, D.C., becoming part of a group of well-connected former OSS men, some of whom were journalists such the Alsop brothers, known as the Georgetown Set.
Originally formed in 1945-1948 by a group of former Office of Strategic Services veterans from World War Two, the grouping would expand its informal membership around the Georgetown section of Washington, D.C. The group would grow to include Ben Bradlee, Frank Wisner who was one of the six founders, George Kennan, Dean Acheson, Desmond FitzGerald, Joseph Alsop, Stewart Alsop who was one of the six founders, Tracy Barnes, Thomas Braden who was a founder, Philip Graham who was a founder, David K.E. Bruce who was a founder, James Truitt, Clark Clifford, Walt Rostow who was a founder, Eugene Rostow,

Eight Is Enough

An Eight Is Enough WeddingEight Is Enough: A Family Reunionseries of the same name
Thomas Wardell Braden (February 22, 1917 – April 3, 2009) was an American CIA official, journalist — best remembered as the author of Eight Is Enough, which spawned a popular television program — and co-host of the CNN show Crossfire. In 1975 Braden published the autobiographical book Eight is Enough, which inspired an ABC television series of the same name with Dick Van Patten in the role of Tom Bradford, the name of Braden's character in the series.
The show was modeled on the life of syndicated newspaper columnist Thomas Braden, a real-life parent with eight children, who wrote a book by the same title.

Stewart Alsop

Stewart Johonnot Oliver AlsopAlsop, StewartStewart Johonnot Oliver Alsop Sr.
At the end of the war, with the encouragement of OSS director William "Wild Bill" Donovan, who thought of Braden as a protégé, he and his OSS paratrooper compatriot Stewart Alsop wrote a journalistic book about the OSS, just as it was being dissolved by Harry Truman, two years before the creation of the CIA.
Sub Rosa : The O.S.S. and American Espionage (1946, with Thomas Braden)

Dick Van Patten

DickDickie Van PattenJames
In 1975 Braden published the autobiographical book Eight is Enough, which inspired an ABC television series of the same name with Dick Van Patten in the role of Tom Bradford, the name of Braden's character in the series.
He was the family patriarch Tom Bradford on Eight Is Enough, which aired from 1977 to 1981 with a ten-to-eleven member cast and was loosely based on a book of the same name by the American journalist Thomas Braden.

Irving Brown

Thus, from 1951 to 1954, the CIA provided $1 million a year, through Braden, to Irving Brown, a moderate Labor leader, and eventually recruited as a CIA officer Jay Lovestone, a noted former communist follower of Nikolai Bukharin (who had been executed by Stalin in 1938), helping him financially to run his network with $1.6 million in 1954 (equivalent to approximately $0 in dollars).
From 1951 to 1954, the CIA division headed by Thomas Braden provided $1 million a year to Brown and Lovestone ($1,600,000 in 1954).

Master list of Nixon's political opponents

master list of Nixon political opponentsenemies listNixon's enemies list
Although the Nixon White House initially included him on a list of friendly journalists, his work eventually landed him on the master list of Nixon political opponents.
Thomas Braden, columnist, Los Angeles Times Syndicate

Pat Buchanan

Patrick J. BuchananBuchananBuchanan, Pat
After replacing Mankiewicz as the "voice from the left" on the syndicated radio show Confrontation, Tom Braden co-hosted the Buchanan–Braden Program, a three-hour radio show with former Nixon aide Pat Buchanan from 1978 to 1984.
He co-hosted a three-hour daily radio show with liberal columnist Tom Braden called the Buchanan-Braden Program.

CNN

CNN.comCable News NetworkCNN Travel
Thomas Wardell Braden (February 22, 1917 – April 3, 2009) was an American CIA official, journalist — best remembered as the author of Eight Is Enough, which spawned a popular television program — and co-host of the CNN show Crossfire.

Dartmouth College

Dartmouth#4 Dartmouth#5 Dartmouth
After graduating from Dartmouth College in 1940, Braden enlisted in the British Army, while the U.S. was still neutral in World War II, and saw combat in Africa.

British Army

ArmyBritishBritish troops
After graduating from Dartmouth College in 1940, Braden enlisted in the British Army, while the U.S. was still neutral in World War II, and saw combat in Africa.

World War II

Second World WarwarWWII
After graduating from Dartmouth College in 1940, Braden enlisted in the British Army, while the U.S. was still neutral in World War II, and saw combat in Africa.

Office of Strategic Services

OSSO.S.S.Office of Strategic Services (OSS)
When the United States entered the war, he was recruited by the U.S. Office of Strategic Services (OSS), the World War II predecessor to the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) and parachuted behind enemy lines into Nazi-occupied France.

Central Intelligence Agency

CIAC.I.A.Central Intelligence Agency (CIA)
When the United States entered the war, he was recruited by the U.S. Office of Strategic Services (OSS), the World War II predecessor to the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) and parachuted behind enemy lines into Nazi-occupied France.

German military administration in occupied France during World War II

occupied FranceGerman occupation of FranceGerman occupation
When the United States entered the war, he was recruited by the U.S. Office of Strategic Services (OSS), the World War II predecessor to the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) and parachuted behind enemy lines into Nazi-occupied France.

William J. Donovan

William DonovanWild Bill" DonovanWilliam "Wild Bill" Donovan
At the end of the war, with the encouragement of OSS director William "Wild Bill" Donovan, who thought of Braden as a protégé, he and his OSS paratrooper compatriot Stewart Alsop wrote a journalistic book about the OSS, just as it was being dissolved by Harry Truman, two years before the creation of the CIA.

Harry S. Truman

TrumanHarry TrumanPresident Truman
At the end of the war, with the encouragement of OSS director William "Wild Bill" Donovan, who thought of Braden as a protégé, he and his OSS paratrooper compatriot Stewart Alsop wrote a journalistic book about the OSS, just as it was being dissolved by Harry Truman, two years before the creation of the CIA.

Robert Frost

Frost
After the war, Braden taught English for a time at Dartmouth (where he met Robert Frost), then moved to Washington, D.C., becoming part of a group of well-connected former OSS men, some of whom were journalists such the Alsop brothers, known as the Georgetown Set.

Korean War

KoreaKoreanthe Korean War
In 1950, at the start of the Korean War, Braden joined the CIA and in 1950 became head of the International Organizations Division (IOD) of CIA's Office of Policy Coordination, the "covert action" arm of agency secret operations, working closely with Allen Dulles and Frank Wisner.

Directorate of Operations (CIA)

Directorate of OperationsDirectorate of PlansClandestine Service
In 1950, at the start of the Korean War, Braden joined the CIA and in 1950 became head of the International Organizations Division (IOD) of CIA's Office of Policy Coordination, the "covert action" arm of agency secret operations, working closely with Allen Dulles and Frank Wisner.

Office of Policy Coordination

OPC
In 1950, at the start of the Korean War, Braden joined the CIA and in 1950 became head of the International Organizations Division (IOD) of CIA's Office of Policy Coordination, the "covert action" arm of agency secret operations, working closely with Allen Dulles and Frank Wisner.

Allen Dulles

AllenAllen W. DullesDulles
In 1950, at the start of the Korean War, Braden joined the CIA and in 1950 became head of the International Organizations Division (IOD) of CIA's Office of Policy Coordination, the "covert action" arm of agency secret operations, working closely with Allen Dulles and Frank Wisner.

Frank Wisner

Frank "The Wizard" WisnerWisner
In 1950, at the start of the Korean War, Braden joined the CIA and in 1950 became head of the International Organizations Division (IOD) of CIA's Office of Policy Coordination, the "covert action" arm of agency secret operations, working closely with Allen Dulles and Frank Wisner.

The Establishment

establishmentBritish Establishmentpolitical establishment
Believing that the cultural milieu of postwar Europe at the time was favorable toward left-wing views, and understanding that The Establishment of Western Allies was rigidly conservative and nationalistic as well as determined to maintain its colonial dominions, it was estimated that American supremacy would be best served by supporting the Democratic left.