Thomas H. Ince

Thomas InceIncevilleThomas H. Ince StudiosInceThomas H. Ince ProductionsThomas Ince CompanyThomas Ince Studios
Thomas Harper Ince (November 16, 1880 – November 19, 1924) was an American silent film producer, director, screenwriter, and actor.wikipedia
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Pacific Palisades, Los Angeles

Pacific PalisadesPacific Palisades, CaliforniaPacific Palisades, CA
He was the first mogul to build his own film studio dubbed "Inceville" in Palisades Highlands.
In 1911, film director Thomas Ince created his Western film factory, "Inceville", which at its peak employed nearly 600 people.

Culver Studios

Desilu StudiosLaird International StudiosCulver City studio and backlot
He then built a new studio about a mile from Triangle, which is now the site of Culver Studios.
Originally created by silent movie pioneer Thomas H. Ince, classics from Hollywood's Golden Age were filmed there.

Civilization (film)

CivilizationCivilization'' (film)
Two of his films, The Italian (1915), for which he wrote the screenplay, and Civilization (1916), which he directed, were selected for preservation by the National Film Registry.
Civilization is a 1916 American pacifist allegorical drama film produced by Thomas H. Ince, written by C. Gardner Sullivan and Edward Sloman, and directed by Ince, Reginald Barker and Raymond B. West.

Sony Pictures Studios

Sony Scoring StageMGM StudiosSony
He later entered into a partnership with D.W. Griffith and Mack Sennett to form the Triangle Motion Picture Company, whose studios are the present-day site of Sony Pictures.
Director Thomas H. Ince built his pioneering Inceville studios in Pacific Palisades in 1912.

John Ince (actor)

John InceJohn
Ince's father worked as both an actor and musical agent and his mother, Ince himself, sister Bertha and brothers, John and Ralph all worked as actors.
John Ince, also known as John E. Ince, (August 29, 1878 – April 10, 1947) was an American stage and motion pictures actor, a film director, and the eldest brother of Thomas H. Ince and Ralph Ince.

The Italian (1915 film)

The ItalianThe Italian'' (1915 film)
Two of his films, The Italian (1915), for which he wrote the screenplay, and Civilization (1916), which he directed, were selected for preservation by the National Film Registry.
The film was produced by Thomas H. Ince, directed by Reginald Barker, and co-written by C. Gardner Sullivan and Ince.

Ralph Ince

RalphInce
Ince's father worked as both an actor and musical agent and his mother, Ince himself, sister Bertha and brothers, John and Ralph all worked as actors.
Ralph Ince was the brother of John Ince and Thomas H. Ince.

Triangle Film Corporation

TriangleTriangle DistributingTriangle Motion Picture Company
He later entered into a partnership with D.W. Griffith and Mack Sennett to form the Triangle Motion Picture Company, whose studios are the present-day site of Sony Pictures.
Triangle was envisioned as a prestige studio based on the producing abilities of filmmakers D. W. Griffith, Thomas Ince and Mack Sennett.

Elinor Kershaw

Elinor K. InceElinor Kershaw Ince
In 1907, Ince met actress Elinor Kershaw ("Nell") and they were married on October 19 of that year.
Elinor Kershaw, also known as Nell and Elinor K. Ince, (November 19, 1884 – September 12, 1971) was an American stage and motion-picture actress; wife of Hollywood Mogul Thomas H. Ince, and mother of actor Richard Ince and writer Thomas H. Ince Jr. Her older sister was the stage actress Willette Kershaw.

D. W. Griffith

D.W. GriffithGriffithD.W. Grifter
He later entered into a partnership with D.W. Griffith and Mack Sennett to form the Triangle Motion Picture Company, whose studios are the present-day site of Sony Pictures.
His new production company became an autonomous production unit partner in Triangle Film Corporation along with Thomas H. Ince and Keystone Studios' Mack Sennett.

Mack Sennett

Bathing BeautiesSennettSennett Bathing Beauties
He later entered into a partnership with D.W. Griffith and Mack Sennett to form the Triangle Motion Picture Company, whose studios are the present-day site of Sony Pictures.
In 1915, Keystone Studios became an autonomous production unit of the ambitious Triangle Film Corporation, as Sennett joined forces with D. W. Griffith and Thomas Ince, both powerful figures in the film industry.

William S. Hart

William HartBill Hartmansion
Ince's directing career began in 1910 through a chance encounter in New York City with an employee from his old acting troupe, William S. Hart.
Beginning in 1915, Hart starred in his own series of two-reel western short subjects for producer Thomas Ince, which were so popular that they were supplanted by a series of feature films.

Carl Laemmle

Carl Laemmle, Sr.Laemmle
This led to more work coordinating productions at Carl Laemmle's Independent Motion Pictures Co. (IMP).
After moving to California, Laemmle purchased as a residence for his family the former home of film pioneer Thomas Ince on Benedict Canyon Drive, Beverly Hills.

Francis Ford (actor)

Francis FordFrancis
Even though he was the first producer-director and directed most of his early productions, by 1913 Ince eventually ceased full-time directing to concentrate on producing, transferring this responsibility to such proteges as Francis Ford and his brother John Ford, Jack Conway, William Desmond Taylor, Reginald Barker, Fred Niblo, Henry King and Frank Borzage.
From San Antonio, Francis began his Hollywood career working for Thomas H. Ince at Ince's Bison studio, directing and appearing in westerns.

John Ford

FordArgosy ProductionsJack Ford
Even though he was the first producer-director and directed most of his early productions, by 1913 Ince eventually ceased full-time directing to concentrate on producing, transferring this responsibility to such proteges as Francis Ford and his brother John Ford, Jack Conway, William Desmond Taylor, Reginald Barker, Fred Niblo, Henry King and Frank Borzage.
Francis played in hundreds of silent pictures for filmmakers such as Thomas Edison, Georges Méliès and Thomas Ince, eventually progressing to become a prominent Hollywood actor-writer-director with his own production company (101 Bison) at Universal.

The Battle of Gettysburg (1913 film)

The Battle of Gettysburglost ''The Battle of Gettysburg'' black & white film of 1913The Battle of Gettysburg'' (1913 film)
One such picture was The Battle of Gettysburg (1913) which was five reels long.
The Battle of Gettysburg is a 1913 American silent drama film directed by Charles Giblyn and Thomas H. Ince.

Culver City, California

Culver CityBlair HillsCulver City, CA
Ironically, on January 16, 1916, a few days after the opening of his first Culver City studio, a fire broke out at "Inceville", the first of many that eventually destroyed all of the buildings.
The first film studio in Culver City was built by Thomas Ince in 1918.

Fred J. Balshofer

Indeed, "Inceville" became a prototype for Hollywood film studios of the future, with a studio head (Ince), producers, directors, production managers, production staff, and writers all working together under one organization (the unit system) and under the supervision of a General Manager, Fred J. Balshofer.
Filming at the time centered mainly around facilities and locations in the Fort Lee, New Jersey area but within a few years Balshofer moved to the West Coast as General Manager of the New York Motion Picture Company, directing western films for their subsidiary, Bison Motion Pictures until Thomas H. Ince joined the studio.

Custer's Last Fight

Two of his most successful films were among his first, War on the Plains (1912) and Custer's Last Fight (1912), which featured many Indians who had actually been in the battle.
It was shot in Inceville, Santa Ynez Canyon and Los Angeles, California.

Edendale, Los Angeles

EdendaleEdendale, CaliforniaBison Motion Pictures
Ince had found out that NYMPC had recently established a West Coast studio named Bison Studios at 1719 Alessandro (now known as Glendale Blvd.) in Edendale (present-day Echo Park) to make westerns and he wanted to direct those pictures.
Originally under the management of Fred J. Balshofer, the directorial reins were taken over a couple years later by motion picture innovator Thomas H. Ince.

Reginald Barker

Even though he was the first producer-director and directed most of his early productions, by 1913 Ince eventually ceased full-time directing to concentrate on producing, transferring this responsibility to such proteges as Francis Ford and his brother John Ford, Jack Conway, William Desmond Taylor, Reginald Barker, Fred Niblo, Henry King and Frank Borzage.
At the company's studio/ranch in California, he worked under film producer and screenwriter Thomas H. Ince.

William Randolph Hearst

HearstHearst familyHearst newspapers
Ince's untimely death at the height of his career, after he became severely ill aboard the private yacht of media tycoon William Randolph Hearst, has caused much speculation, although the official cause of his death was heart failure.
The Cat's Meow is a 2001 drama film inspired by the mysterious death of film mogul Thomas H. Ince. The film takes place aboard publisher William Randolph Hearst's yacht on a weekend cruise celebrating Ince's 44th birthday in November 1924. Hearst is portrayed by actor Edward Herrmann.

Self-Realization Fellowship Lake Shrine

Lake Shrine
He settled upon a 460 acre tract of land called Bison Ranch located at Sunset Blvd. and Pacific Coast Highway in the Santa Monica Mountains, (the present-day location of the Self-Realization Fellowship Lake Shrine) which he rented by the day.
It was purchased by the silent film producer and director Thomas H. Ince in 1912 to serve as his studio and was subsequently named Inceville.

New York Motion Picture Company

In September 1911, Ince walked into the offices of actor-financier Charles O. Baumann (1874-1931) who co-owned the New York Motion Picture Company (NYMP) with actor-writer Adam Kessel, Jr. (1866-1946).
Triangle Film sought to combine the talents of producers D.W. Griffith, Thomas Ince and Mack Sennett.

Human Wreckage

By now, Ince had drifted away from westerns in favor of social dramas and he made a few significant films including Anna Christie (1923), based on the play by Eugene O'Neill, and Human Wreckage (1923), which was an early anti-drug film starring Dorothy Davenport (widow of addicted star Wallace Reid).
The film was produced by Davenport and Thomas H. Ince.