Thomas J. Watson Research Center

IBM Thomas J. Watson Research CenterIBM T.J. Watson Research CenterIBM Watson Research CenterT. J. Watson Research CenterT.J. Watson Research CenterIBM Thomas J Watson Research CenterThomas Watson Research CenterIBM T. J. Watson Research CenterIBM New York Scientific CenterIBM Watson Laboratory
The Thomas J. Watson Research Center is the headquarters for IBM Research.wikipedia
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IBM Research

IBM Research LaboratoryIBM research centerIBM Research Laboratories
The Thomas J. Watson Research Center is the headquarters for IBM Research. The center, headquarters of IBM's Research division, is named for both Thomas J. Watson, Sr. and Thomas Watson, Jr., who led IBM as president and CEO respectively from 1915 (when it was known as the Computing-Tabulating-Recording Company) to 1971.
This was the first IBM laboratory devoted to pure science and later expanded into additional IBM Research locations in Westchester County, New York starting in the 1950s, including the Thomas J. Watson Research Center in 1961.

Yorktown Heights, New York

Yorktown HeightsYorktown Heights, NYYorktown
The center comprises two sites, with its main laboratory in Yorktown Heights, New York, U.S., 38 miles (61 km) north of New York City and with offices in Cambridge, Massachusetts.
Yorktown Heights is in the town of Yorktown, New York, in northern Westchester County, 45 miles from New York City, with forty square miles of rolling hills, farmland, residential areas and light industry including the IBM Thomas J. Watson Research Center.

Alan J. Hoffman

Alan HoffmanA.J. HoffmanAlan Hoffman (mathematician)
Notable staff have included the mathematicians Benoît Mandelbrot, Ralph E. Gomory, Shmuel Winograd, Alan Hoffman, Don Coppersmith, Mike Shub, Gregory Chaitin, the inventor Robert Dennard, roboticist Matthew T. Mason, author Clifford A. Pickover, computer scientists Frances E. Allen, John Cocke, Stuart Feldman, Ken Iverson, Irene Greif, Steven Rohall, Li-Te Cheng and Mark N. Wegman, Barry Appelman, Wietse Venema, the 1990 Economics Nobel Prize winner, Harry Markowitz, and physicists Llewellyn Thomas, Rolf Landauer, Charles H. Bennett, Elliott H. Lieb, J. B. Gunn, Leroy Chang, 1973 Physics Nobel Prize winner, Leo Esaki, Solomon Assefa and Jay Gambetta.
Alan Jerome Hoffman (born May 30, 1924 ) is an American mathematician and IBM Fellow emeritus, T. J. Watson Research Center, IBM, in Yorktown Heights, New York.

IBM

International Business MachinesIBM CorporationInternational Business Machines Corporation
The center, headquarters of IBM's Research division, is named for both Thomas J. Watson, Sr. and Thomas Watson, Jr., who led IBM as president and CEO respectively from 1915 (when it was known as the Computing-Tabulating-Recording Company) to 1971.
IBM Research is headquartered at the Thomas J. Watson Research Center in New York, and facilities include the Almaden lab in California, Austin lab in Texas, Australia lab in Melbourne, Brazil lab in São Paulo and Rio de Janeiro, China lab in Beijing and Shanghai, Ireland lab in Dublin, Haifa lab in Israel, India lab in Delhi and Bangalore, Tokyo lab, Zurich lab and Africa lab in Nairobi.

Eero Saarinen

SaarinenSaarinen-designedEero Saarinen and Associates
The new headquarters were finally located with a new lab in Yorktown Heights designed by architect Eero Saarinen completed in 1961, with the 115th Street site closing in 1970.
With the success of this project, Saarinen was then invited by other major American corporations such as John Deere, IBM, and CBS to design their new headquarters or other major corporate buildings.

New York (state)

New YorkNew York StateNY
The center comprises two sites, with its main laboratory in Yorktown Heights, New York, U.S., 38 miles (61 km) north of New York City and with offices in Cambridge, Massachusetts.
Albany, Saratoga County, Rensselaer County, and the Hudson Valley, collectively recognized as eastern New York's Tech Valley, have experienced significant growth in the computer hardware side of the high-technology industry, with great strides in the nanotechnology sector, digital electronics design, and water- and electricity-dependent integrated microchip circuit manufacturing, involving companies including IBM and its Thomas J. Watson Research Center, and the three foreign-owned firms, GlobalFoundries, Samsung, and Taiwan Semiconductor, among others.

Clifford A. Pickover

Clifford PickoverPickover, Clifford A.C. A. Pickover
Notable staff have included the mathematicians Benoît Mandelbrot, Ralph E. Gomory, Shmuel Winograd, Alan Hoffman, Don Coppersmith, Mike Shub, Gregory Chaitin, the inventor Robert Dennard, roboticist Matthew T. Mason, author Clifford A. Pickover, computer scientists Frances E. Allen, John Cocke, Stuart Feldman, Ken Iverson, Irene Greif, Steven Rohall, Li-Te Cheng and Mark N. Wegman, Barry Appelman, Wietse Venema, the 1990 Economics Nobel Prize winner, Harry Markowitz, and physicists Llewellyn Thomas, Rolf Landauer, Charles H. Bennett, Elliott H. Lieb, J. B. Gunn, Leroy Chang, 1973 Physics Nobel Prize winner, Leo Esaki, Solomon Assefa and Jay Gambetta.
For many years, he was employed at the IBM Thomas J. Watson Research Center in Yorktown, New York where he was Editor-in-Chief of the IBM Journal of Research and Development.

Benoit Mandelbrot

Benoît MandelbrotMandelbrotBenoît B. Mandelbrot
Notable staff have included the mathematicians Benoît Mandelbrot, Ralph E. Gomory, Shmuel Winograd, Alan Hoffman, Don Coppersmith, Mike Shub, Gregory Chaitin, the inventor Robert Dennard, roboticist Matthew T. Mason, author Clifford A. Pickover, computer scientists Frances E. Allen, John Cocke, Stuart Feldman, Ken Iverson, Irene Greif, Steven Rohall, Li-Te Cheng and Mark N. Wegman, Barry Appelman, Wietse Venema, the 1990 Economics Nobel Prize winner, Harry Markowitz, and physicists Llewellyn Thomas, Rolf Landauer, Charles H. Bennett, Elliott H. Lieb, J. B. Gunn, Leroy Chang, 1973 Physics Nobel Prize winner, Leo Esaki, Solomon Assefa and Jay Gambetta.
In 1958 the couple moved to the United States where Mandelbrot joined the research staff at the IBM Thomas J. Watson Research Center in Yorktown Heights, New York.

Barry Appelman

Notable staff have included the mathematicians Benoît Mandelbrot, Ralph E. Gomory, Shmuel Winograd, Alan Hoffman, Don Coppersmith, Mike Shub, Gregory Chaitin, the inventor Robert Dennard, roboticist Matthew T. Mason, author Clifford A. Pickover, computer scientists Frances E. Allen, John Cocke, Stuart Feldman, Ken Iverson, Irene Greif, Steven Rohall, Li-Te Cheng and Mark N. Wegman, Barry Appelman, Wietse Venema, the 1990 Economics Nobel Prize winner, Harry Markowitz, and physicists Llewellyn Thomas, Rolf Landauer, Charles H. Bennett, Elliott H. Lieb, J. B. Gunn, Leroy Chang, 1973 Physics Nobel Prize winner, Leo Esaki, Solomon Assefa and Jay Gambetta.
It was not until Appelman, and his colleagues at the Thomas Watson Research Center, first began to write programs on the mainframe system letting each other know when they were actually online, that modern day Instant Messaging was born.

Thomas J. Watson

Thomas J. Watson, Sr.Thomas J. Watson Sr.Thomas Watson
The center, headquarters of IBM's Research division, is named for both Thomas J. Watson, Sr. and Thomas Watson, Jr., who led IBM as president and CEO respectively from 1915 (when it was known as the Computing-Tabulating-Recording Company) to 1971.

Leroy Chang

Leroy L. Chang
Notable staff have included the mathematicians Benoît Mandelbrot, Ralph E. Gomory, Shmuel Winograd, Alan Hoffman, Don Coppersmith, Mike Shub, Gregory Chaitin, the inventor Robert Dennard, roboticist Matthew T. Mason, author Clifford A. Pickover, computer scientists Frances E. Allen, John Cocke, Stuart Feldman, Ken Iverson, Irene Greif, Steven Rohall, Li-Te Cheng and Mark N. Wegman, Barry Appelman, Wietse Venema, the 1990 Economics Nobel Prize winner, Harry Markowitz, and physicists Llewellyn Thomas, Rolf Landauer, Charles H. Bennett, Elliott H. Lieb, J. B. Gunn, Leroy Chang, 1973 Physics Nobel Prize winner, Leo Esaki, Solomon Assefa and Jay Gambetta.
As a research physicist he studied semiconductors for nearly 30 years at IBM's Thomas J. Watson Research Center, New York.

Jay Gambetta

Notable staff have included the mathematicians Benoît Mandelbrot, Ralph E. Gomory, Shmuel Winograd, Alan Hoffman, Don Coppersmith, Mike Shub, Gregory Chaitin, the inventor Robert Dennard, roboticist Matthew T. Mason, author Clifford A. Pickover, computer scientists Frances E. Allen, John Cocke, Stuart Feldman, Ken Iverson, Irene Greif, Steven Rohall, Li-Te Cheng and Mark N. Wegman, Barry Appelman, Wietse Venema, the 1990 Economics Nobel Prize winner, Harry Markowitz, and physicists Llewellyn Thomas, Rolf Landauer, Charles H. Bennett, Elliott H. Lieb, J. B. Gunn, Leroy Chang, 1973 Physics Nobel Prize winner, Leo Esaki, Solomon Assefa and Jay Gambetta.
Jay Gambetta is a physicist, co-leading the team at IBM Thomas J Watson Research Center working to build a large-scale quantum computer.

Matthew T. Mason

Matt Mason
Notable staff have included the mathematicians Benoît Mandelbrot, Ralph E. Gomory, Shmuel Winograd, Alan Hoffman, Don Coppersmith, Mike Shub, Gregory Chaitin, the inventor Robert Dennard, roboticist Matthew T. Mason, author Clifford A. Pickover, computer scientists Frances E. Allen, John Cocke, Stuart Feldman, Ken Iverson, Irene Greif, Steven Rohall, Li-Te Cheng and Mark N. Wegman, Barry Appelman, Wietse Venema, the 1990 Economics Nobel Prize winner, Harry Markowitz, and physicists Llewellyn Thomas, Rolf Landauer, Charles H. Bennett, Elliott H. Lieb, J. B. Gunn, Leroy Chang, 1973 Physics Nobel Prize winner, Leo Esaki, Solomon Assefa and Jay Gambetta.
He worked at the IBM Thomas J. Watson Research Center as a research visitor in 1978, and has been teaching at the School of Computer Science and the Robotics Institute at Carnegie Mellon University since 1982.

Gregory Chaitin

ChaitinChaitin, GregoryG. J. Chaitin
Notable staff have included the mathematicians Benoît Mandelbrot, Ralph E. Gomory, Shmuel Winograd, Alan Hoffman, Don Coppersmith, Mike Shub, Gregory Chaitin, the inventor Robert Dennard, roboticist Matthew T. Mason, author Clifford A. Pickover, computer scientists Frances E. Allen, John Cocke, Stuart Feldman, Ken Iverson, Irene Greif, Steven Rohall, Li-Te Cheng and Mark N. Wegman, Barry Appelman, Wietse Venema, the 1990 Economics Nobel Prize winner, Harry Markowitz, and physicists Llewellyn Thomas, Rolf Landauer, Charles H. Bennett, Elliott H. Lieb, J. B. Gunn, Leroy Chang, 1973 Physics Nobel Prize winner, Leo Esaki, Solomon Assefa and Jay Gambetta.
He was formerly a researcher at IBM's Thomas J. Watson Research Center and is now a professor at the Federal University of Rio de Janeiro.

IBM Blue Gene

Blue GeneBlue Gene/QBlue Gene/L
As of November 2010, the center houses three TOP500 supercomputers; the oldest and still fastest of which, a BlueGene/L system designed for protein folding simulations, called BGW (Blue Gene Watson), entered the list in the 06/2005 issue, then positioned second behind fellow Blue Gene/L in LLNL.
The initial research and development work was pursued at IBM T.J. Watson Research Center and led by William R. Pulleyblank.

Ralph E. Gomory

Ralph GomoryR. E. Gomory
Notable staff have included the mathematicians Benoît Mandelbrot, Ralph E. Gomory, Shmuel Winograd, Alan Hoffman, Don Coppersmith, Mike Shub, Gregory Chaitin, the inventor Robert Dennard, roboticist Matthew T. Mason, author Clifford A. Pickover, computer scientists Frances E. Allen, John Cocke, Stuart Feldman, Ken Iverson, Irene Greif, Steven Rohall, Li-Te Cheng and Mark N. Wegman, Barry Appelman, Wietse Venema, the 1990 Economics Nobel Prize winner, Harry Markowitz, and physicists Llewellyn Thomas, Rolf Landauer, Charles H. Bennett, Elliott H. Lieb, J. B. Gunn, Leroy Chang, 1973 Physics Nobel Prize winner, Leo Esaki, Solomon Assefa and Jay Gambetta.

Irene Greif

Notable staff have included the mathematicians Benoît Mandelbrot, Ralph E. Gomory, Shmuel Winograd, Alan Hoffman, Don Coppersmith, Mike Shub, Gregory Chaitin, the inventor Robert Dennard, roboticist Matthew T. Mason, author Clifford A. Pickover, computer scientists Frances E. Allen, John Cocke, Stuart Feldman, Ken Iverson, Irene Greif, Steven Rohall, Li-Te Cheng and Mark N. Wegman, Barry Appelman, Wietse Venema, the 1990 Economics Nobel Prize winner, Harry Markowitz, and physicists Llewellyn Thomas, Rolf Landauer, Charles H. Bennett, Elliott H. Lieb, J. B. Gunn, Leroy Chang, 1973 Physics Nobel Prize winner, Leo Esaki, Solomon Assefa and Jay Gambetta.
After Lotus was acquired by IBM, she became an IBM Fellow and served as director of collaborative user experience in the company's Thomas J. Watson Research Center.

Llewellyn Thomas

ThomasL. H. ThomasLlewellyn Hilleth Thomas
Notable staff have included the mathematicians Benoît Mandelbrot, Ralph E. Gomory, Shmuel Winograd, Alan Hoffman, Don Coppersmith, Mike Shub, Gregory Chaitin, the inventor Robert Dennard, roboticist Matthew T. Mason, author Clifford A. Pickover, computer scientists Frances E. Allen, John Cocke, Stuart Feldman, Ken Iverson, Irene Greif, Steven Rohall, Li-Te Cheng and Mark N. Wegman, Barry Appelman, Wietse Venema, the 1990 Economics Nobel Prize winner, Harry Markowitz, and physicists Llewellyn Thomas, Rolf Landauer, Charles H. Bennett, Elliott H. Lieb, J. B. Gunn, Leroy Chang, 1973 Physics Nobel Prize winner, Leo Esaki, Solomon Assefa and Jay Gambetta.
In 1946 he became a member of the staff of the Watson Scientific Computing Laboratory at Columbia University, remaining there until 1968.

J. B. Gunn

J. GunnJohn Battiscombe "J. B." Gunn
Notable staff have included the mathematicians Benoît Mandelbrot, Ralph E. Gomory, Shmuel Winograd, Alan Hoffman, Don Coppersmith, Mike Shub, Gregory Chaitin, the inventor Robert Dennard, roboticist Matthew T. Mason, author Clifford A. Pickover, computer scientists Frances E. Allen, John Cocke, Stuart Feldman, Ken Iverson, Irene Greif, Steven Rohall, Li-Te Cheng and Mark N. Wegman, Barry Appelman, Wietse Venema, the 1990 Economics Nobel Prize winner, Harry Markowitz, and physicists Llewellyn Thomas, Rolf Landauer, Charles H. Bennett, Elliott H. Lieb, J. B. Gunn, Leroy Chang, 1973 Physics Nobel Prize winner, Leo Esaki, Solomon Assefa and Jay Gambetta.
He first moved to Canada in 1956, to take up an Assistant Professorship at the University of British Columbia, before going to the United States in 1959 to work at IBM's Thomas J. Watson Research Center at Yorktown Heights, New York.

Wietse Venema

Notable staff have included the mathematicians Benoît Mandelbrot, Ralph E. Gomory, Shmuel Winograd, Alan Hoffman, Don Coppersmith, Mike Shub, Gregory Chaitin, the inventor Robert Dennard, roboticist Matthew T. Mason, author Clifford A. Pickover, computer scientists Frances E. Allen, John Cocke, Stuart Feldman, Ken Iverson, Irene Greif, Steven Rohall, Li-Te Cheng and Mark N. Wegman, Barry Appelman, Wietse Venema, the 1990 Economics Nobel Prize winner, Harry Markowitz, and physicists Llewellyn Thomas, Rolf Landauer, Charles H. Bennett, Elliott H. Lieb, J. B. Gunn, Leroy Chang, 1973 Physics Nobel Prize winner, Leo Esaki, Solomon Assefa and Jay Gambetta.
Since emigrating to the U.S. in 1996 and until 2015, he has been working for the IBM Thomas J. Watson Research Center in New York State.

Leo Esaki

Dr. Leo EsakiEsakiEsaki diodes
Notable staff have included the mathematicians Benoît Mandelbrot, Ralph E. Gomory, Shmuel Winograd, Alan Hoffman, Don Coppersmith, Mike Shub, Gregory Chaitin, the inventor Robert Dennard, roboticist Matthew T. Mason, author Clifford A. Pickover, computer scientists Frances E. Allen, John Cocke, Stuart Feldman, Ken Iverson, Irene Greif, Steven Rohall, Li-Te Cheng and Mark N. Wegman, Barry Appelman, Wietse Venema, the 1990 Economics Nobel Prize winner, Harry Markowitz, and physicists Llewellyn Thomas, Rolf Landauer, Charles H. Bennett, Elliott H. Lieb, J. B. Gunn, Leroy Chang, 1973 Physics Nobel Prize winner, Leo Esaki, Solomon Assefa and Jay Gambetta.
Esaki moved to the United States in 1960 and joined the IBM T. J. Watson Research Center, where he became an IBM Fellow in 1967.

Tech companies in the New York metropolitan area

Tech companies in the New York City metropolitan regioncomputer industryTech companies in New York City
* Tech companies in the New York metropolitan area

List of IEEE milestones

IEEE MilestoneIEEE MilestonesIEEE Milestone in Electrical Engineering
The work done at the Center from 1960–1984 was named an IEEE Milestone in 2009.

Charles H. Bennett (physicist)

Charles H. BennettCharles BennettBennett
Notable staff have included the mathematicians Benoît Mandelbrot, Ralph E. Gomory, Shmuel Winograd, Alan Hoffman, Don Coppersmith, Mike Shub, Gregory Chaitin, the inventor Robert Dennard, roboticist Matthew T. Mason, author Clifford A. Pickover, computer scientists Frances E. Allen, John Cocke, Stuart Feldman, Ken Iverson, Irene Greif, Steven Rohall, Li-Te Cheng and Mark N. Wegman, Barry Appelman, Wietse Venema, the 1990 Economics Nobel Prize winner, Harry Markowitz, and physicists Llewellyn Thomas, Rolf Landauer, Charles H. Bennett, Elliott H. Lieb, J. B. Gunn, Leroy Chang, 1973 Physics Nobel Prize winner, Leo Esaki, Solomon Assefa and Jay Gambetta.

New York City

New YorkNew York, New YorkNew York City, New York
The center comprises two sites, with its main laboratory in Yorktown Heights, New York, U.S., 38 miles (61 km) north of New York City and with offices in Cambridge, Massachusetts.