Thomas Jefferson

JeffersonPresident JeffersonJeffersonianPresident Thomas JeffersonJefferson, ThomasMr. JeffersonJefferson administrationThomas Jefferson Information Centerthird PresidentJeffersonians
Thomas Jefferson (April 13, [O.S. April 2] 1743 – July 4, 1826) was an American Founding Father who was the principal author of the Declaration of Independence and later served as the third President of the United States from 1801 to 1809.wikipedia
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George Washington

WashingtonGeneral WashingtonPresident Washington
He became the United States Minister to France in May 1785, and subsequently the nation's first Secretary of State in 1790–1793 under President George Washington.
He promoted and oversaw implementation of a strong, well-financed national government, but remained impartial in the fierce rivalry between Thomas Jefferson and Alexander Hamilton.

Democratic-Republican Party

Democratic-RepublicanDemocratic-RepublicansRepublican
Jefferson and James Madison organized the Democratic-Republican Party to oppose the Federalist Party during the formation of the First Party System.
The Democratic-Republican Party (formally the Republican Party) was an American political party formed by Thomas Jefferson and James Madison around 1792 to oppose the centralizing policies of the new Federalist Party run by Alexander Hamilton, who was Secretary of the Treasury and chief architect of George Washington's administration.

Aaron Burr

Burr, AaronAaron Burr, Jr.Burr
Jefferson's second term was beset with difficulties at home, including the trial of former Vice President Aaron Burr.
He was the third Vice President of the United States (1801–1805), serving during Thomas Jefferson's first term.

Federalist Party

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Jefferson and James Madison organized the Democratic-Republican Party to oppose the Federalist Party during the formation of the First Party System.
The party controlled the federal government until 1801, when it was overwhelmed by the Democratic-Republican opposition led by Thomas Jefferson.

Martha Jefferson

Martha Wayles SkeltonMartha WaylesMartha
Another point of controversy stems from the evidence that after his wife Martha died in 1782, Jefferson fathered children with Martha's half-sister, Sally Hemings, who was his slave.
Martha Skelton Jefferson (October 30, 1748 – September 6, 1782) was the wife of Thomas Jefferson.

James Madison

MadisonPresident MadisonPresident James Madison
Jefferson and James Madison organized the Democratic-Republican Party to oppose the Federalist Party during the formation of the First Party System.
To oppose Hamilton, Thomas Jefferson and Madison organized the Democratic-Republican Party, which became one of the nation's two first major political parties alongside Hamilton's Federalist Party.

First Party System

political partiesfirst political partiestwo-party system
Jefferson and James Madison organized the Democratic-Republican Party to oppose the Federalist Party during the formation of the First Party System.
It featured two national parties competing for control of the presidency, Congress, and the states: the Federalist Party, created largely by Alexander Hamilton, and the rival Jeffersonian Democratic-Republican Party, formed by Thomas Jefferson and James Madison, usually called at the time the Republican Party.

Sally Hemings

Sally Hemings: An American ScandalaffairsHemings
Another point of controversy stems from the evidence that after his wife Martha died in 1782, Jefferson fathered children with Martha's half-sister, Sally Hemings, who was his slave.
undefined 1773 – 1835) was an enslaved woman of mixed race owned by President Thomas Jefferson of the United States.

Monticello

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Thomas inherited approximately 5,000 acre of land, including Monticello.
Monticello was the primary plantation of Thomas Jefferson, the third President of the United States, who began designing and building Monticello at age 26 after inheriting land from his father.

Notes on the State of Virginia

His only full-length book is Notes on the State of Virginia (1785), considered perhaps the most important American book published before 1800.
Notes on the State of Virginia (1785) is a book written by Thomas Jefferson.

Act Prohibiting Importation of Slaves

prohibitedprohibiting the importation of slaves1808 law against the American slave trade
In 1803, Jefferson began a controversial process of Indian tribe removal to the newly organized Louisiana Territory, and he signed the Act Prohibiting Importation of Slaves in 1807.
This legislation was promoted by President Thomas Jefferson, who called for its enactment in his 1806 State of the Union Address.

1804 United States presidential election

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He was reelected in 1804.
Incumbent Democratic-Republican President Thomas Jefferson defeated Federalist Charles Cotesworth Pinckney of South Carolina.

Peter Jefferson

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His father Peter Jefferson was a planter and surveyor who died when Jefferson was fourteen; his mother was Jane Randolph.
Peter Jefferson (February 29, 1708 – August 17, 1757) was the father of US President Thomas Jefferson (1743–1826).

Randolph Jefferson

Randolph
The Jeffersons returned to Shadwell in 1752, where Peter died in 1757; his estate was divided between his sons Thomas and Randolph.
Randolph Jefferson (October 1, 1755 – August 7, 1815) was the younger brother of Thomas Jefferson and a planter.

George Wythe

WytheWythe, George
Small introduced him to the George Wythe and Francis Fauquier along with British Empiricists including John Locke, Francis Bacon, and Isaac Newton.
Wythe taught and was a mentor to Thomas Jefferson, John Marshall, Henry Clay and other men who became American leaders.

Historical rankings of presidents of the United States

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Jefferson continues to rank highly among U.S. presidents.
The remaining places within the Top 10 are often rounded out by Theodore Roosevelt, Thomas Jefferson, Harry S. Truman, Woodrow Wilson, Dwight D. Eisenhower, Andrew Jackson, and John F. Kennedy.

College of William & Mary

William & MaryCollege of William and MaryWilliam and Mary
He graduated from the College of William & Mary and briefly practiced law, with the largest number of his cases concerning land ownership claims.
William & Mary educated American Presidents Thomas Jefferson (third), James Monroe (fifth), and John Tyler (tenth) as well as other key figures important to the development of the nation, including the fourth U.S. Supreme Court Chief Justice John Marshall of Virginia, Speaker of the House of Representatives Henry Clay of Kentucky, sixteen members of the Continental Congress, and four signers of the Declaration of Independence, earning it the nickname "the Alma Mater of the Nation."

Kentucky and Virginia Resolutions

Kentucky ResolutionsVirginia and Kentucky ResolutionsText of the Kentucky Resolutions of 1798
With Madison, he anonymously wrote the controversial Kentucky and Virginia Resolutions in 1798–1799, which sought to strengthen states' rights by nullifying the federal Alien and Sedition Acts.
The Kentucky and Virginia Resolutions of 1798 were written secretly by Vice President Thomas Jefferson and James Madison respectively.

States' rights

states rightsstate's rightsstate sovereignty
With Madison, he anonymously wrote the controversial Kentucky and Virginia Resolutions in 1798–1799, which sought to strengthen states' rights by nullifying the federal Alien and Sedition Acts.
When the Federalists passed the Alien and Sedition Acts in 1798, Thomas Jefferson and James Madison secretly wrote the Kentucky and Virginia Resolutions, which provide a classic statement in support of states' rights and called on state legislatures to nullify unconstitutional federal laws.

Richard Bland

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He persuaded his cousin Richard Bland to spearhead the legislation's passage, but reaction was strongly negative.
Richard Bland (May 6, 1710 – October 26, 1776), sometimes referred to as Richard Bland II or Richard Bland of Jordan's Point, was an American planter and statesman from Virginia and a cousin of Thomas Jefferson.

Albemarle County, Virginia

Albemarle CountyAlbemarleAlbermarle County
In addition to practicing law, Jefferson represented Albemarle County as a delegate in the Virginia House of Burgesses from 1769 until 1775.
However, its most famous inhabitant was Thomas Jefferson, who built his estate home, Monticello, in the county.

Alien and Sedition Acts

Sedition ActSedition Act of 1798Alien and Sedition Laws
With Madison, he anonymously wrote the controversial Kentucky and Virginia Resolutions in 1798–1799, which sought to strengthen states' rights by nullifying the federal Alien and Sedition Acts.
At the time, the majority of immigrants supported Thomas Jefferson and the Democratic-Republicans, the political opponents of the Federalists.

Martha Jefferson Randolph

MarthaMartha JeffersonMartha Randolph
During their ten years of marriage, Martha bore six children: Martha "Patsy" (1772–1836); Jane (1774–1775); a son who lived for only a few weeks in 1777; Mary Wayles "Polly" (1778–1804); Lucy Elizabeth (1780–1781); and another Lucy Elizabeth (1782–1785).
Martha Jefferson "Patsy" Randolph (September 27, 1772 – October 10, 1836) was the daughter of Thomas Jefferson, the third President of the United States, and his wife Martha Wayles Skelton Jefferson.

John Adams

AdamsJohnPresident John Adams
Previously, he had been elected the second Vice President of the United States, serving under John Adams from 1797 to 1801.
Opposition from Federalists and accusations of despotism from Republicans led to Adams' re-election loss to his former friend Thomas Jefferson, and he retired to Massachusetts.

Randolph family of Virginia

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Jefferson began his childhood education beside the Randolph children with tutors at Tuckahoe.
Thomas Jefferson, great-grandson of William Randolph, was a Virginia Burgess for Albemarle County and the principal author of the Declaration of Independence.