Thomas Kendall

KendallMissionaries arriving from about 1814Reverend Thomas Kendall
Thomas Kendall (13 December 1778 – 6 August 1832) was a New Zealand missionary, recorder of the Māori language, schoolmaster, arms dealer, and Pākehā Māori.wikipedia
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Māori language

MāoriMaorite reo Māori
Thomas Kendall (13 December 1778 – 6 August 1832) was a New Zealand missionary, recorder of the Māori language, schoolmaster, arms dealer, and Pākehā Māori. Kendall learned te reo Māori, the Māori language, while in New Zealand, and wrote the primer A korao no New Zealand; or, the New Zealander's first book (1815).
Missionaries arriving from about 1814 learned to speak Māori, and introduced the Latin alphabet.

Pākehā Māori

Pākehā-MāoriPakeha Maori
Thomas Kendall (13 December 1778 – 6 August 1832) was a New Zealand missionary, recorder of the Māori language, schoolmaster, arms dealer, and Pākehā Māori.
While some lived the rest of their lives amongst Māori, others, such as the lapsed missionary Thomas Kendall, did so only briefly.

North Thoresby

He grew up in North Thoresby, Lincolnshire, England, where he was influenced by his local minister Reverend William Myers and the evangelical revival within the Anglican Church.

Ngāpuhi

Ngā PuhiNgapuhiNga Puhi
They met Rangatira, including Ruatara and the rising war leader of the Ngapuhi, Hongi Hika, who had helped pioneer the introduction of the musket to Māori warfare.
Thomas Kendall, John King, and William Hall, missionaries of the Church Missionary Society, founded the first mission station in Oihi Bay (a small cove in the north-east of Rangihoua Bay) in the Bay of Islands in 1814 and over the next decades established farms and schools in the area.

A korao no New Zealand

Kendall learned te reo Māori, the Māori language, while in New Zealand, and wrote the primer A korao no New Zealand; or, the New Zealander's first book (1815).
A korao no New Zealand; or, the New Zealander's first book was written by Anglican missionary Thomas Kendall in 1815, and is the first book written in the Māori language.

Samuel Marsden

MarsdenRev. Samuel MarsdenReverend Samuel Marsden
A mission to New Zealand was promoted by Samuel Marsden, a Church Missionary Society agent in New South Wales.
Thomas Kendall and William Hall sailed on the Earl Spencer, departing on 31 May 1813 to the Bay of Islands, New Zealand, on a voyage of investigation, and returned to Sydney on 10 of October.

Hongi Hika

Hongi
They met Rangatira, including Ruatara and the rising war leader of the Ngapuhi, Hongi Hika, who had helped pioneer the introduction of the musket to Māori warfare.
He befriended Thomas Kendall—one of three lay preachers sent by the Church Missionary Society to establish a Christian toehold in New Zealand.

Charles de Thierry

Baron de ThierryCharles Philippe Hippolyte de Thierry
At Cambridge Kendall and Hongi met the exiled French adventurer Charles de Thierry with whom Hongi did a land-for-muskets deal, purchasing 30,000 acres in the Bay of Islands.
There, he met Hongi Hika, the Ngāpuhi chief who was visiting England, and the missionary Thomas Kendall.

Henry Kendall (poet)

Henry KendallKendallHenry Clarence Kendall
One of his grandsons, Henry Kendall, was an Australian poet.
His father, Basil Kendall, was the son of the Rev. Thomas Kendall who came to Sydney in 1809 and five years later went as a missionary to New Zealand.

Samuel Lee (linguist)

Samuel LeeProfessor Samuel LeeLee
The Rangatira and Kendall spent five months in Britain, mostly working with Professor Samuel Lee in Cambridge, where Kendall's views about the language were justified (if some of his other theories were not; for example, Kendall believed the Māori were descended from Egyptians).
Building on the work of the Church Missionary Society missionary Thomas Kendall and New Zealand chiefs Hongi Hika and Tītore he helped create the first dictionary of te Reo, the Māori language.

Ruatara (chief)

Ruatara
They met Rangatira, including Ruatara and the rising war leader of the Ngapuhi, Hongi Hika, who had helped pioneer the introduction of the musket to Māori warfare.
On 25 December 1814, he and Hongi Hika welcomed Marsden and missionaries John KIng, William Hall and Thomas Kendall on Ngāpuhi land, and hosted his Christian mission station, the first to be established in New Zealand.

Musket Wars

intertribal warfareinvasionsmusket war
In the following years, the guns helped him conquer a significant northern portion of the North Island in the Musket Wars and made him a man of considerable importance.
In 1821 Hongi Hika travelled to England with missionary Thomas Kendall and in Sydney on his return voyage traded the gifts he had obtained in England for between 300 and 500 muskets, which he then used to launch even more devastating raids, with even bigger armies, against iwi from the Auckland region to Rotorua.

Warren Hastings (1789 ship)

Speke
Kendall, Hongi Hika, and Waikato travelled to New South Wales aboard the convict transport Speke.
Spekes passengers included Hongi Hika and Waikato (two Māori chiefs), and the missionary Thomas Kendall, all three of whom were returning to New Zealand.

New Zealand

NZLNZKiwi
Thomas Kendall (13 December 1778 – 6 August 1832) was a New Zealand missionary, recorder of the Māori language, schoolmaster, arms dealer, and Pākehā Māori. More than 150 years previously, Dutch sailor Abel Tasman and his crew had become the first Europeans to sight New Zealand, and 40 years previously the coast had been mapped by Captain James Cook.

Missionary

missionariesmissionary workmission
Thomas Kendall (13 December 1778 – 6 August 1832) was a New Zealand missionary, recorder of the Māori language, schoolmaster, arms dealer, and Pākehā Māori.

Schoolmaster

masterschoolmistressassistant master
Thomas Kendall (13 December 1778 – 6 August 1832) was a New Zealand missionary, recorder of the Māori language, schoolmaster, arms dealer, and Pākehā Māori.

Anglicanism

AnglicanAnglican ChurchAnglicans
He grew up in North Thoresby, Lincolnshire, England, where he was influenced by his local minister Reverend William Myers and the evangelical revival within the Anglican Church.

North Somercotes

While a teenager he moved with Myers to North Somercotes, where he was assistant schoolmaster and also helped run Myers's 15 acre farm.

Immingham

RoxtonGrimsby and ImminghamImmingham Railfreight Terminal
Kendall also tutored a gentleman's children in Immingham, where he met Jane Quickfall.

Hops

hophoppedhop-pickers
In 1805, while attempting to sell a cargo of hops in London, Kendall visited Bentinck Chapel, Marylebone.

Marylebone

St MaryleboneMarylebone, LondonSt. Marylebone
In 1805, while attempting to sell a cargo of hops in London, Kendall visited Bentinck Chapel, Marylebone.

Basil Woodd

Preaching of Basil Woodd and William Mann changed his outlook.

Church Mission Society

Church Missionary SocietyCMSCMS Missionary
The Anglican Church Missionary Society was, at the time, a powerful organisation with a number of political connections, including the Colonial Secretary.

Abel Tasman

Abel Janszoon TasmanTasmanAbel Janzoon Tasman
More than 150 years previously, Dutch sailor Abel Tasman and his crew had become the first Europeans to sight New Zealand, and 40 years previously the coast had been mapped by Captain James Cook.

James Cook

Captain CookCaptain James CookCook
More than 150 years previously, Dutch sailor Abel Tasman and his crew had become the first Europeans to sight New Zealand, and 40 years previously the coast had been mapped by Captain James Cook.