A report on Thomas Sackville, 1st Earl of Dorset

Portrait by John de Critz
Arms of Sir Thomas Sackville, 1st Earl of Dorset, KG
The armour of Thomas Sackville, made in the Greenwich Royal Workshops.

English statesman, poet, and dramatist.

- Thomas Sackville, 1st Earl of Dorset
Portrait by John de Critz

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Private drive to Buckhurst Park

Buckhurst Park, Sussex

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English country house and landscaped park in Withyham, East Sussex.

English country house and landscaped park in Withyham, East Sussex.

Private drive to Buckhurst Park
Stoneland Lodge, now Buckhurst House, in 1783
Buckhurst c.1900

Buckhurst was the home of the Sackville family until it was vacated in the early 1600s by Thomas Sackville, 1st Earl of Dorset.

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Gorboduc (play)

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English play from 1561.

English play from 1561.

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The authors were Thomas Norton and Thomas Sackville, said to be responsible for the first three Acts, and the final two, respectively.

Lady Anne Clifford, portrait by William Larkin, National Portrait Gallery, London

Lady Anne Clifford

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English peeress.

English peeress.

Lady Anne Clifford, portrait by William Larkin, National Portrait Gallery, London
Lady Anne Clifford, portrait by William Larkin, National Portrait Gallery, London
The Great Picture, a huge triptych measuring 8ft 5" high and 16ft 2" wide, commissioned in 1646 by Anne Clifford, attributed to Jan van Belcamp (1610–1653), formerly hanging in Appleby Castle and now displayed in the Abbot Hall Art Gallery in Kendal, Cumbria. It depicts Anne as a girl at left and as a mature woman at right. The central panel shows her parents and young brothers. The painting is replete with significant elements referring to her life and to her succession to her paternal inheritance, gained after a lengthy legal dispute.
The title page of a 1923 edition of Clifford's diaries.

Firstly on 27 February 1609 to Richard Sackville, 3rd Earl of Dorset (d.1624). Sackville's grandfather had arranged the marriage, writing in April 1607 to ask the courtier George More of Loseley to influence the Countess of Cumberland for the match with "that virtuous young lady the Lady Anne". The old Earl of Dorset had to counter rumours against his family honour that he trumped negotiations for her hand from the heir to the Earl of Exeter. By her first husband Anne had five children, three sons who all died before adulthood and two daughters and co-heiresses:

Hercules Rollock

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Hercules Rollock (fl. 1577–1599), Edinburgh schoolmaster and writer of Latin verse.

Hercules Rollock (fl. 1577–1599), Edinburgh schoolmaster and writer of Latin verse.

In 1579 he stayed in Sussex with Sir Thomas Sackville and composed a Latin country house poem, which he presented to Sackville, praising the fruitful landscape and the rooms of Buckhurst Place with their painted inscriptions.

Knole in 2009

Knole

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Country house and former archbishop's palace owned by the National Trust.

Country house and former archbishop's palace owned by the National Trust.

Knole in 2009
Knole in 1880
Cardinal Thomas Bourchier
North West Front, Knole, Sevenoaks
Edward Sackville, in a miniature by John Hoskins, 1635
Knole from Kip and Knyff's Britannia Illustrata (1709)
The Green Court at Knole
Vita Sackville-West, in 1926
Knole in 2018
Main Gateway, April 2018
A painting of Spencer Compton, 2nd Earl of Northampton by Cornelis Janssens van Ceulen, one of the portraits on display at Knole
View into the inner walled garden

Meanwhile, Elizabeth had possibly granted the estate to her cousin Thomas Sackville who, at that time, had the title of Lord Buckhurst.

Knole House, Kent

Robert Sackville, 2nd Earl of Dorset

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English aristocrat and politician, with humanist and commercial interests.

English aristocrat and politician, with humanist and commercial interests.

Knole House, Kent
Monument to Anne Sackville and her second husband Sir Edward Lewis, Edington Priory Church, Wiltshire

He was the eldest son of Thomas Sackville, 1st Earl of Dorset, by Cecily, daughter of Sir John Baker.

Portrait attributed to John de Critz, c. undefined 1605

James VI and I

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King of Scotland as James VI from 24 July 1567 and King of England and Ireland as James I from the union of the Scottish and English crowns on 24 March 1603 until his death in 1625.

King of Scotland as James VI from 24 July 1567 and King of England and Ireland as James I from the union of the Scottish and English crowns on 24 March 1603 until his death in 1625.

Portrait attributed to John de Critz, c. undefined 1605
Portrait of James as a boy, after Arnold Bronckorst, 1574
James (right) depicted aged 17 beside his mother Mary (left), 1583. In reality, they were separated when he was still a baby.
James in 1586, age 20 (attrib. Adrian Vanson or the school of Alonso Sánchez Coello)
1589 marriage contract between James and Anne of Denmark
Portrait of Anne of Denmark attributed to John de Critz, c. undefined 1605
Suspected witches kneeling before King James; Daemonologie (1597)
Scottish gold coin from 1609–1625
James argued a theological basis for monarchy in The True Law of Free Monarchies.
The Union of the Crowns was symbolised in James's personal royal heraldic badge after 1603, the Tudor rose dimidiated with the Scottish thistle ensigned by the royal crown.
Portrait after John de Critz, c. undefined 1605. James wears the Three Brothers jewel, three rectangular red spinels; the jewel is now lost.
Portrait by Paul van Somer, c. undefined 1620. In the background is the Banqueting House, Whitehall, by architect Inigo Jones, commissioned by James.
Robert Carr, 1st Earl of Somerset, by John Hoskins, 1625–30
George Villiers, 1st Duke of Buckingham, by Peter Paul Rubens, 1625
Portrait of James by Daniël Mijtens, 1621, in the National Portrait Gallery
On the ceiling of the Banqueting House, Rubens depicted James being carried to heaven by angels.
James I and his royal progeny, by Charles Turner, from a mezzotint by Samuel Woodburn (1814), after Willem de Passe

In the early years of James's reign, the day-to-day running of the government was tightly managed by the shrewd Cecil, later Earl of Salisbury, ably assisted by the experienced Thomas Egerton, whom James made Baron Ellesmere and Lord Chancellor, and by Thomas Sackville, soon Earl of Dorset, who continued as Lord Treasurer.

The title page of Robert Andrews' translation of Virgil into English blank verse, printed by John Baskerville in 1766

Blank verse

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Poetry written with regular metrical but unrhymed lines, almost always in iambic pentameter.

Poetry written with regular metrical but unrhymed lines, almost always in iambic pentameter.

The title page of Robert Andrews' translation of Virgil into English blank verse, printed by John Baskerville in 1766

The 1561 play Gorboduc by Thomas Norton and Thomas Sackville was the first English play to use blank verse.

Thomas Egerton 1st Viscount Brackley, National Portrait Gallery, London

Thomas Egerton, 1st Viscount Brackley

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English nobleman, judge and statesman from the Egerton family who served as Lord Keeper and Lord Chancellor for twenty-one years.

English nobleman, judge and statesman from the Egerton family who served as Lord Keeper and Lord Chancellor for twenty-one years.

Thomas Egerton 1st Viscount Brackley, National Portrait Gallery, London
Arms of Egerton: Argent, a lion rampant gules between three pheons sable
Engraved portrait of Thomas Egerton by Simon de Passe

Egerton and Lord Buckhurst travelled to Northamptonshire in June 1603 to greet Anne of Denmark and her children as they journeyed towards Windsor Castle.

Portrait of Sir George More.

George More

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English courtier and politician who sat in the House of Commons at various times between 1584 and 1625.

English courtier and politician who sat in the House of Commons at various times between 1584 and 1625.

Portrait of Sir George More.

In April 1607 the Earl of Dorset wrote to More hoping he could influence the Countess of Cumberland to arrange the marriage of her daughter Lady Anne Clifford to his grandson Richard Sackville.