Thomas Tompion

Tompion
Thomas Tompion (1639–1713) was an English clockmaker, watchmaker and mechanician who is still regarded to this day as the Father of English Clockmaking.wikipedia
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George Graham (clockmaker)

George GrahamGraham
A plaque commemorates the house he shared on Fleet Street with his equally famous pupil and successor George Graham.
A Friend (Quaker) like his mentor Thomas Tompion, Graham left Cumberland in 1688 for London to work with Tompion.

Worshipful Company of Clockmakers

Clockmakers' CompanyClockmakers(C. C.)
The Worshipful Company of Clockmakers maintains the family cottage in Ickwell, his home hamlet in the parish of Northill.
1703, Thomas Tompion

Ickwell

The Worshipful Company of Clockmakers maintains the family cottage in Ickwell, his home hamlet in the parish of Northill.
Ickwell was the home village of the English master clockmaker and watchmaker Thomas Tompion (c. 1639–1713), and Ickwell Green still boasts the family cottage, which is maintained by the Worshipful Company of Clockmakers.

Watch

wristwatchwatchesdigital watch
Due to his relationship with the scientist Robert Hooke he made some of the first watches with balance springs, these had the potential to be much more accurate than earlier watches.
The verge escapement was replaced in quality watches by the cylinder escapement, invented by Thomas Tompion in 1695 and further developed by George Graham in the 1720s.

Robert Hooke

HookeDr Robert HookeHooke, Robert
Due to his relationship with the scientist Robert Hooke he made some of the first watches with balance springs, these had the potential to be much more accurate than earlier watches. This is of interest as Tompion's most important early patron was the scientist Robert Hooke who may well have known the Knibb family, as both were in Oxford.
Hooke interacted with noted craftsmen such as Thomas Tompion, the clockmaker, and Christopher Cocks (Cox), an instrument maker.

Royal Observatory, Greenwich

Royal ObservatoryGreenwichGreenwich Observatory
When the Royal Observatory was established in 1676, King Charles II selected Tompion to create two identical clocks based on Hooke's idea of a very long pendulum swinging in a very small arc. These were fixed in the Octagon room, each was driven by a deadbeat escapement designed by Richard Towneley, with both clocks only needing to be wound once a year.
Moore donated two clocks, built by Thomas Tompion, which were installed in the 20 foot high Octagon Room, the principal room of the building.

Northill

The Worshipful Company of Clockmakers maintains the family cottage in Ickwell, his home hamlet in the parish of Northill. Thomas Tompion was born around 1639 and was baptized on 25 July 1639 in Northill, Bedfordshire, England.
Northill was the baptismal place, and possibly the birthplace, of the famous clockmaker Thomas Tompion, who built the famous Pump Room Clock in 1709 that has since seen active service in the city of Bath.

Grandfather clock

longcase clocklongcase clocksgrandfather clocks
Another of Tompion's innovations was to create a numbering system for his spring and longcase clocks, which is thought to be the first time that a serial numbering system was applied to manufactured goods.
Within the year Thomas Tompion, the most prominent British clockmaker, was making them too.

Balance spring

hairspringisochronousbalance spring or "hair spring
Due to his relationship with the scientist Robert Hooke he made some of the first watches with balance springs, these had the potential to be much more accurate than earlier watches.
A few early watches had a Barrow regulator, which used a worm drive, but the first widely used regulator was invented by Thomas Tompion around 1680.

Anchor escapement

deadbeat escapementdeadbeatpocket watch
When the Royal Observatory was established in 1676, King Charles II selected Tompion to create two identical clocks based on Hooke's idea of a very long pendulum swinging in a very small arc. These were fixed in the Octagon room, each was driven by a deadbeat escapement designed by Richard Towneley, with both clocks only needing to be wound once a year.
However it was actually invented around 1675 by astronomer Richard Towneley, and first used by Graham's mentor Thomas Tompion in a clock built for Sir Jonas Moore, and in the two precision regulators he made for the new Greenwich Observatory in 1676, mentioned in correspondence between Astronomer Royal John Flamsteed and Towneley

Richard Towneley

grandfatherTowneley micrometer
When the Royal Observatory was established in 1676, King Charles II selected Tompion to create two identical clocks based on Hooke's idea of a very long pendulum swinging in a very small arc. These were fixed in the Octagon room, each was driven by a deadbeat escapement designed by Richard Towneley, with both clocks only needing to be wound once a year.
Towneley designed a novel clock escapement for this purpose and two astronomical clocks were commissioned to his design from the clockmaker Thomas Tompion and installed at the Greenwich Observatory.

Watchmaker

watchmakingwatchmakerswatch-maker
As England's most prominent watchmaker, Tompion's workshop built about 5,500 watches and 650 clocks during his career.
Thomas Tompion

Clockwise (film)

ClockwiseClockwise'' (1986) (film)
In the 1986 film Clockwise, the school of which John Cleese's character is headmaster was named for Thomas Tompion, appropriate given the headmaster's attention to punctuality.
Brian Stimpson (Cleese), headmaster of Thomas Tompion Comprehensive School, has been elected to chair the annual Headmasters' Conference.

Hampton Court Palace

Hampton CourtChapel Royalthe Chapel Royal, Hampton Court
The sundials in Kew Gardens and Hampton Court Gardens, both circa 1680, London
Much of the original furniture dates from the late 17th and early 18th centuries, including tables by Jean Pelletier, "India back" walnut chairs by Thomas Roberts and clocks and a barometer by Thomas Tompion.

Kew Gardens

KewRoyal Botanic GardensKew Herbarium
The sundials in Kew Gardens and Hampton Court Gardens, both circa 1680, London
It was sculpted by Martin Holden and is a replica of one by Thomas Tompion, a celebrated 17th-century clockmaker, which had been sited near the surviving palace building since 1832 to mark the site of James Bradley's observations leading to his discovery of the aberration of light.

Victoria and Albert Museum

V&AVictoria & Albert MuseumSouth Kensington Museum
Tompion is one of the statues of craftsmen set on the Exhibition Road facade of the Victoria and Albert Museum, South Kensington.
Other clock makers with work in the collection include: Thomas Tompion, Benjamin Lewis Vulliamy, John Ellicott and William Carpenter.

Bedfordshire

BedfordCounty of BedfordBDF
Thomas Tompion was born around 1639 and was baptized on 25 July 1639 in Northill, Bedfordshire, England.

Joseph Knibb

His early clockmaking style shows a strong connection with Joseph Knibb.

Huguenots

HuguenotFrench HuguenotFrench Huguenots
Many of these workmen had French and Dutch Huguenot origins, for example Daniel and Nicholas Delander, Henry Callot and Charles Molyns, the latter possibly related to the family Windmills.

Charles II of England

Charles IIKing Charles IIPrince Charles
When the Royal Observatory was established in 1676, King Charles II selected Tompion to create two identical clocks based on Hooke's idea of a very long pendulum swinging in a very small arc. These were fixed in the Octagon room, each was driven by a deadbeat escapement designed by Richard Towneley, with both clocks only needing to be wound once a year.

William Derham

Derham, William
William Derham mentions this in his book The Artificial Clockmaker.

Fusee (horology)

fuseefuseeschain and fusee
A few of Tompion's early spiral balance spring movements were also of a similar specification to the Huygens/Thuret pattern as they had a standing barrel and no fusee.

Grande sonnerie

His three-train grande sonnerie bracket clocks are masterpieces.

Breguet (brand)

BreguetBreguet S. A.Breguet" company
He shares this characteristic with the later French-Swiss watchmaker Breguet.

Westminster Abbey

WestminsterAbbot of Westminsterabbey of Westminster
Thomas Tompion died on 20 November 1713 and was buried in Westminster Abbey, George Graham being buried alongside him in 1751.