Thomas Willis

Dr. Thomas WillisDr Thomas WillisSir Thomas WillisWillisWillis, Thomas
Thomas Willis (27 January 1621 – 11 November 1675) was an English doctor who played an important part in the history of anatomy, neurology and psychiatry.wikipedia
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Neurology

neurologistneurologicalneurologists
Thomas Willis (27 January 1621 – 11 November 1675) was an English doctor who played an important part in the history of anatomy, neurology and psychiatry.
The academic discipline began between the 15th and 16th centuries with the work and research of many neurologists such as Thomas Willis, Robert Whytt, Matthew Baillie, Charles Bell, Moritz Heinrich Romberg, Duchenne de Boulogne, William A. Hammond, Jean-Martin Charcot, and John Hughlings Jackson.

John Fell (bishop)

John FellBishop John FellFell
He maintained an Anglican position; an Anglican congregation met at his lodgings in the 1650s, including John Fell, John Dolben, and Richard Allestree.
In 1648 he was deprived of his studentship by the parliamentary visitors, and during the next few years he resided chiefly at Oxford with his brother-in-law, Thomas Willis, at whose house opposite Merton College he and his friends Richard Allestree and John Dolben kept up the service of the Church of England throughout the Commonwealth.

Robert Hooke

HookeDr Robert HookeHooke, Robert
He employed Robert Hooke as an assistant, in the period 1656-8; this probably was another Fell family connection, since Samuel Fell knew Hooke's father in Freshwater, Isle of Wight.
Here he was employed as an assistant to Thomas Willis and to Robert Boyle, for whom he built the vacuum pumps used in Boyle's gas law experiments, and conducted the experiments themselves.

John Locke

LockeLockeanJ Locke
Besides Hooke, others in the group were Nathaniel Hodges, John Locke, Richard Lower, Henry Stubbe and John Ward.
He obtained a bachelor of medicine in February 1675, having studied medicine extensively during his time at Oxford and worked with such noted scientists and thinkers as Robert Boyle, Thomas Willis, Robert Hooke and Richard Lower.

Richard Lower (physician)

Richard LowerDr. Richard LowerLower
Besides Hooke, others in the group were Nathaniel Hodges, John Locke, Richard Lower, Henry Stubbe and John Ward.
Lower was born in St Tudy, Cornwall and studied at Westminster School where he met John Locke, and Christ Church, Oxford where he met Thomas Willis.

Willys baronets

a baronet, of Fen Dittonbaronetbaronetcy
He was a kinsman of the Willys baronets of Fen Ditton, Cambridgeshire.
The anatomist, neurologist and psychologist Thomas Willis was a kinsman of this line; his father, Thomas, the son of another Thomas Willis (of Kennington, Oxfordshire, Berkshire prior to the 1974 boundary changes) was the steward of Great Bedwyn, Wiltshire and owned a farm there (http://galileo.rice.edu/Catalog/NewFiles/willis.html ; http://www.dana.org/news/cerebrum/detail.aspx?id=1336).

Ralph Bathurst

Dean BathurstDr Ralph Bathurst
) In the broader Oxford scene, he was a colleague in the "Oxford club" of experimentalists with Ralph Bathurst, Robert Boyle, William Petty, John Wilkins and Christopher Wren.
He collaborated with Thomas Willis, and it was to Bathurst that Willis dedicated his first medical publication, the Diatribae Duae of 1659.

North Hinksey

Ferry HinkseyRuskin's diggerssmall village
In the Civil War years he was a royalist, dispossessed of the family farm at North Hinksey by Parliamentary forces.
Ferry Hinksey (as it then was) is also the burial place of Thomas and Rachael Willis (died 1648 and 1631 respectively) the parents of the physician Dr Thomas Willis.

Sedleian Professor of Natural Philosophy

SedleianSedleian Chair of Natural PhilosophySedleian reader of natural philosophy
From 1660 until his death, he was Sedleian Professor of Natural Philosophy at Oxford.

Circle of Willis

cerebral arterial circlearterial circlebrain arteries
His most notable discovery was the "Circle of Willis", a circle of arteries on the base of the brain.
It is named after Thomas Willis (1621–1675), an English physician.

John Wilkins

WilkinsWilkinBishop Wilkins
) In the broader Oxford scene, he was a colleague in the "Oxford club" of experimentalists with Ralph Bathurst, Robert Boyle, William Petty, John Wilkins and Christopher Wren.
Besides some of the London group (Goddard, Wallis, Ward, Wren who was a young protégé of Scarburgh), it included (in the account of Thomas Sprat) Ralph Bathurst, Robert Boyle, William Petty, Lawrence Rooke, Thomas Willis, and Matthew Wren.

Christopher Wren

Sir Christopher WrenWrenWren-Gibbs
) In the broader Oxford scene, he was a colleague in the "Oxford club" of experimentalists with Ralph Bathurst, Robert Boyle, William Petty, John Wilkins and Christopher Wren.
His drawing was put to academic use in providing many of the anatomical drawings for the anatomy textbook of the brain, Cerebri Anatome (1664), published by Thomas Willis, which coined the term "neurology."

Oxford Philosophical Club

Oxford clubOxford Experimental Philosophy ClubOxford experimentalists
) In the broader Oxford scene, he was a colleague in the "Oxford club" of experimentalists with Ralph Bathurst, Robert Boyle, William Petty, John Wilkins and Christopher Wren.
Others who became involved were Ralph Bathurst, Thomas Willis, and Matthew Wren.

Samuel Fell

Fell's father Samuel Fell had been expelled as Dean of Christ Church, in 1647; Willis married Samuel Fell's daughter Mary, and brother-in-law John Fell would later be his biographer.
Samuel Fell married Margaret, daughter of Thomas Wylde, esq., of The Commandery Worcester, by whom he was the father of John Fell, Dean of Christ Church and Bishop of Oxford, and several daughters including Mary who married Thomas Willis.

Iatrochemistry

iatrochemistiatrochemicaliatrochemical medicine
He had a successful medical practice, in which he applied both his understanding of anatomy and known remedies, attempting to integrate the two; he mixed both iatrochemical and mechanical views.
Specifically, one English iatrochemist, Thomas Willis (1621–1675), considered the effect of diaphoretics (sweat-promoting drugs) as resulting from the mechanisms of the drug entering the blood and associating or disturbing blood and flow which produces a state of heat and sweat.

Anne Conway (philosopher)

Anne ConwayAnne Conway, Viscountess ConwayLady Anne Finch Conway
Among his patients was the philosopher Anne Conway, with whom he had intimate relations, but although he was consulted, Willis failed to relieve her headaches.
She had medical consults from Dr. Thomas Willis.

Browne Willis

Willis
Browne Willis, the antiquary, was son of Thomas Willis (1658–1699), the eldest son of Thomas and Mary.
He was grandson of Dr Thomas Willis, the physician.

Cranial nerves

cranial nervecranialCN
Willis was the first to number the cranial nerves in the order in which they are now usually enumerated by anatomists.
Much later, in 1664, English anatomist Sir Thomas Willis suggested that there were actually 9 pairs of nerves.

Fenny Stratford

MagioviniumSt. Martin's ChurchM AGIOVINIUM
Between 1724 and 1730, Browne Willis rebuilt St. Martin's Church on the site of the old Chantry Chapel of St. Margaret and St. Catherine at Fenny Stratford.
He erected the church as a memorial to his grandfather Dr. Thomas Willis, a famous physician, who lived in St. Martin's Lane in the parish of St. Martin-in-the-Fields in London, and who died on St. Martin's day, 11 November 1675.

Cerebellum

cerebellarcerebellar cortexcerebellar nuclei
In the cerebellum he remarks the arborescent arrangement of the white and grey matter and gives a good account of the internal carotids and the communications which they make with the branches of the basilar artery.
Vesalius discussed the cerebellum briefly, and the anatomy was described more thoroughly by Thomas Willis in 1664.

Diabetes

diabetes mellitusdiabeticdiabetics
He coined the term mellitus in diabetes mellitus.
It was Thomas Willis who in 1675 added "mellitus" to the word "diabetes" as a designation for the disease, when he noticed the urine of a person with diabetes had a sweet taste (glycosuria).

Matthew Nicholas

After Mary's death in 1670, he married the widow Elizabeth Calley, daughter of Matthew Nicholas, in 1672: there were no children of this marriage.
He was survived by two daughters, and three sons (George, Edward and John) from the marriage; one of the daughters Elizabeth married William Calley, and then as a widow in 1672 married Thomas Willis.

Anatomy

anatomistanatomicalanatomically
Thomas Willis (27 January 1621 – 11 November 1675) was an English doctor who played an important part in the history of anatomy, neurology and psychiatry.

Psychiatry

psychiatricpsychiatristpsychiatrists
Thomas Willis (27 January 1621 – 11 November 1675) was an English doctor who played an important part in the history of anatomy, neurology and psychiatry.

Great Bedwyn

BedwynBedwyn MagnaBedewynde
Willis was born on his parents' farm in Great Bedwyn, Wiltshire, where his father held the stewardship of the Manor.