Thoracic diaphragm

diaphragmdiaphragmatichemidiaphragmcaval openingdiaphragm muscleDiaphragmarespiratory musclesdiaphraghmdiaphragm (anatomy)diaphragm.
The thoracic diaphragm, or simply the diaphragm, is a sheet of internal skeletal muscle in humans and other mammals that extends across the bottom of the thoracic cavity.wikipedia
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Lung

lungspulmonaryright lung
The diaphragm separates the thoracic cavity, containing the heart and lungs, from the abdominal cavity and performs an important function in respiration: as the diaphragm contracts, the volume of the thoracic cavity increases, creating a negative pressure there, which draws air into the lungs.
In humans, the main muscle of respiration that drives breathing is the diaphragm.

Abdominal cavity

abdominalabdomenabdominal (peritoneal) cavity
The diaphragm separates the thoracic cavity, containing the heart and lungs, from the abdominal cavity and performs an important function in respiration: as the diaphragm contracts, the volume of the thoracic cavity increases, creating a negative pressure there, which draws air into the lungs.
Its dome-shaped roof is the thoracic diaphragm, a thin sheet of muscle under the lungs, and its floor is the pelvic inlet, opening into the pelvis.

Heart

cardiachuman heartapex of the heart
The diaphragm separates the thoracic cavity, containing the heart and lungs, from the abdominal cavity and performs an important function in respiration: as the diaphragm contracts, the volume of the thoracic cavity increases, creating a negative pressure there, which draws air into the lungs.
The superior vena cava drains blood from above the diaphragm and empties into the upper back part of the right atrium.

Thoracic outlet

inferior thoracic apertureApertura thoracis inferiorlower opening of the thorax
Its peripheral part consists of muscular fibers that take origin from the circumference of the inferior thoracic aperture and converge to be inserted into a central tendon.
It is closed by the diaphragm, which separates the thoracic cavity from the abdominal cavity.

Esophagus

oesophagusesophageallower esophageal sphincter
There are three large openings—the aortic, the esophageal, and the caval opening—plus a series of smaller ones. It helps to expel vomit, feces, and urine from the body by increasing intra-abdominal pressure, aids in childbirth, and prevents acid reflux by exerting pressure on the esophagus as it passes through the esophageal hiatus.
The esophagus is a fibromuscular tube, about 25 centimeters long in adults, which travels behind the trachea and heart, passes through the diaphragm and empties into the uppermost region of the stomach.

Central tendon of diaphragm

central tendon
The central tendon of the diaphragm is a thin but strong aponeurosis near the center of the vault formed by the muscle, closer to the front than to the back of the thorax, so that the posterior muscular fibers are the longer.
The central tendon of the diaphragm is a thin but strong aponeurosis situated slightly anterior to the vault formed by the muscle, resulting in longer posterior muscle fibers.

Aorta

aorticaortic archaortic root
There are three large openings—the aortic, the esophageal, and the caval opening—plus a series of smaller ones.
One way of classifying a part of the aorta is by anatomical compartment, where the thoracic aorta (or thoracic portion of the aorta) runs from the heart to the diaphragm.

Phrenic nerve

phrenicphrenic nervesnervous control
The diaphragm is primarily innervated by the phrenic nerve which is formed from the cervical nerves C3, C4 and C5.
The phrenic nerve is a nerve that originates in the neck (C3–C5) and passes down between the lung and heart to reach the diaphragm.

Mammal

mammalsMammaliamammalian
The thoracic diaphragm, or simply the diaphragm, is a sheet of internal skeletal muscle in humans and other mammals that extends across the bottom of the thoracic cavity. Other mammals have diaphragms, and other vertebrates such as amphibians and reptiles have diaphragm-like structures, but important details of the anatomy vary, such as the position of the lungs in the abdominal cavity.
Breathing is mainly achieved with the diaphragm, which divides the thorax from the abdominal cavity, forming a dome convex to the thorax.

Aortic hiatus

aortic aperturehiatus aorticus
The aortic hiatus is a hole in the diaphragm.

Esophageal hiatus

transhiatial
It helps to expel vomit, feces, and urine from the body by increasing intra-abdominal pressure, aids in childbirth, and prevents acid reflux by exerting pressure on the esophagus as it passes through the esophageal hiatus.
In human anatomy, the esophageal hiatus is an opening in the diaphragm through which the esophagus and the vagus nerve pass.

Thorax

chestthoracicthoraces
The central tendon of the diaphragm is a thin but strong aponeurosis near the center of the vault formed by the muscle, closer to the front than to the back of the thorax, so that the posterior muscular fibers are the longer.
The contents of the thorax include the heart and lungs (and the thymus gland); the (major and minor pectoral muscles, trapezius muscles, and neck muscle); and internal structures such as the diaphragm, the esophagus, the trachea, and a part of the sternum known as the xiphoid process).

Crus of diaphragm

cruracrura of the diaphragmcrus of the diaphragm
The left and right crura are tendons that blend with
crura), refers to one of two tendinous structures that extends below the diaphragm to the vertebral column.

Thoracic cavity

chest cavityintrathoracicthoracic
The thoracic diaphragm, or simply the diaphragm, is a sheet of internal skeletal muscle in humans and other mammals that extends across the bottom of the thoracic cavity.

Liver

hepaticliver protein synthesislivers
In humans, it is located in the right upper quadrant of the abdomen, below the diaphragm.

Vagus nerve

vagusvagalcranial nerve X
It forms the posterior vagal trunk at the lower part of the esophagus and enters the diaphragm through the esophageal hiatus.

Reptile

reptilesReptiliaSauropsida
Other mammals have diaphragms, and other vertebrates such as amphibians and reptiles have diaphragm-like structures, but important details of the anatomy vary, such as the position of the lungs in the abdominal cavity.
Tegu lizards are known to possess a proto-diaphragm, which separates the pulmonary cavity from the visceral cavity.

Inferior vena cava

inferiorIVCposterior vena cava
There are three large openings—the aortic, the esophageal, and the caval opening—plus a series of smaller ones.
It passes through the thoracic diaphragm at the caval opening at the level of T8.

Lateral arcuate ligament

lateral lumbocostal archArcus lumbocostalis lateralislateral
There are two lumbocostal arches, a medial and a lateral, on either side.
The lateral arcuate ligament (also lateral lumbocostal arch and external arcuate ligament) is a ligament under the diaphragm that arches across the upper part of the quadratus lumborum muscle.

Xiphoid process

xiphisternumxiphoid cartilagexiphosternal junction
At the front, fibres insert into the xiphoid process and along the costal margin.
Pressure on the xiphoid process should be avoided when administering chest compressions in CPR, as this can cause the xiphoid process to break off, resulting in punctures or lacerations of the diaphragm.

Kidney

kidneysrenalkidney disorder
The right kidney sits just below the diaphragm and posterior to the liver.

Medial arcuate ligament

Medial lumbocostal archArcus lumbocostalis medialismedial
There are two lumbocostal arches, a medial and a lateral, on either side.
The medial arcuate ligament (also medial lumbocostal arch and internal arcuate ligament) is a tendinous fascia that arches over the psoas major muscle as it passes through the diaphragm.

Thoracic duct

Arcus ductus thoracicilymph ducts
It traverses the diaphragm at the aortic aperture and ascends the superior and posterior mediastinum between the descending thoracic aorta (to its left) and the azygos vein (to its right).

Descending thoracic aorta

thoracic aortathoracicthoracic part
From above, the diaphragm receives blood from branches of the internal thoracic arteries, namely the pericardiophrenic artery and musculophrenic artery; from the superior phrenic arteries, which arise directly from the thoracic aorta; and from the lower internal intercostal arteries.
The descending thoracic aorta begins at the lower border of the fourth thoracic vertebra where it is continuous with the aortic arch, and ends in front of the lower border of the twelfth thoracic vertebra, at the aortic hiatus in the diaphragm where it becomes the abdominal aorta.

Septum transversum

The septum transversum, the primitive central tendon of the diaphragm, originates at the rostral pole of the embryo and is relocated during longitudinal folding to the ventral thoracic region.
The septum transversum is a thick mass of cranial mesenchyme, formed in the embryo, that gives rise to parts of the thoracic diaphragm and the ventral mesentery of the foregut in the developed human being and other mammals.