Thrasymachus

Thrasymachus of Chalcedon
Thrasymachus (Θρασύμαχος Thrasýmachos; c. 459 – c. 400 BC) was a sophist of ancient Greece best known as a character in Plato's Republic.wikipedia
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Sophist

sophistssophistrySophism
Thrasymachus (Θρασύμαχος Thrasýmachos; c. 459 – c. 400 BC) was a sophist of ancient Greece best known as a character in Plato's Republic. His career appears to have been spent as a sophist at Athens, although the exact nature of his work and thought is unclear.
Others include Gorgias, Prodicus, Hippias, Thrasymachus, Lycophron, Callicles, Antiphon, and Cratylus.

Chalcedon

Bishop of ChalcedonChalcedoniaTitular Bishop of Chalcedon
Thrasymachus was a citizen of Chalcedon, on the Bosphorus.

Theodorus of Byzantium

Theodorus
Quoting the W. A. Pickard-Cambridge text: "For it may be that in everything, as the saying is 'the first start is the main part'... This is in fact what has happened in regard to rhetorical speeches and to practically all the other arts: for those who discovered the beginnings of them advanced them in all only a little way, whereas the celebrities of to-day are the heirs (so to speak) of a long succession of men who have advanced them bit by bit, and so have developed them to their present form, Tisias coming next after the first founders, then Thrasymachus after Tisias, and Theodorus next to him, while several people have made their several contributions to it: and therefore it is not to be wondered at that the art has attained considerable dimensions."
Aristotle places him beside Tisias and Thrasymachus as the key movers in the history of rhetoric.

Republic (Plato)

RepublicThe RepublicPlato's Republic
Thrasymachus (Θρασύμαχος Thrasýmachos; c. 459 – c. 400 BC) was a sophist of ancient Greece best known as a character in Plato's Republic.
Socrates then asks Cephalus, Polemarchus, and Thrasymachus their definitions of justice.

Might makes right

might is rightKraterocracykraterocratic
"Herodicus said of Thrasymachus, 'You are always bold in battle (thrasymakhos)!'" Dillon and Gergel suggest that this might explain Plato's choice of Thrasymachus as the "combative and bombastic propounder of the 'might is right' theory" for his Republic.
In the first chapter of Plato's Republic, Thrasymachus claims that "justice is nothing else than the interest of the stronger", which Socrates then disputes.

Glaucon

The rest of the dialogue is occasioned by Glaucon's dissatisfaction with Socrates' refutation.
Plato's Republic begins with Socrates and Glaucon, who have just attended the inaugural Athenian celebration of the festival of Bendis, being playfully compelled by Polemarchus and Glaucon's brother Adeimantus and their companions to return with them to the house of Polemarchus, where they find Polemarchus' father Cephalus, his brothers Lysias and Euthydemus and several other guests, including a sophist, Thrasymachus.

Ancient Greece

Greekancient Greekancient Greeks
Thrasymachus (Θρασύμαχος Thrasýmachos; c. 459 – c. 400 BC) was a sophist of ancient Greece best known as a character in Plato's Republic.

Plato

Plato's dialoguesDialogues of PlatoPlatonic dialogues
Thrasymachus (Θρασύμαχος Thrasýmachos; c. 459 – c. 400 BC) was a sophist of ancient Greece best known as a character in Plato's Republic.

Bosporus

BosphorusBosphorus StraitBosphorous
Thrasymachus was a citizen of Chalcedon, on the Bosphorus.

Athens

Athens, GreeceAthenianAthenians
His career appears to have been spent as a sophist at Athens, although the exact nature of his work and thought is unclear.

Paeon (prosody)

paeonpaeonicpaeons
He is credited with an increase in the rhythmic character of Greek oratory, especially the use of the paeonic rhythm in prose, and a greater appeal to the emotions through gesture.

Aristophanes

AristofanesAristophanicOld Comedy
Aristophanes makes what is the most precisely dateable of references to Thrasymachus, in a passing joke from a lost play dated to 427 BCE.

Clement of Alexandria

ClementClemens AlexandrinusSt. Clement of Alexandria
A fragment from Clement of Alexandria provides some further context by placing Thrasymachus contrary to the Macedonian Archelaus.

Macedonia (ancient kingdom)

MacedonMacedoniaancient Macedonia
A fragment from Clement of Alexandria provides some further context by placing Thrasymachus contrary to the Macedonian Archelaus.

Archelaus I of Macedon

ArchelausArchelaus IArchelaos Perdikas
A fragment from Clement of Alexandria provides some further context by placing Thrasymachus contrary to the Macedonian Archelaus.

Euripides

EuripideanEuripedesMr. Euripides
"And while Euripides says in the Telephus, 'Shall we who are Greeks be slaves to barbarians?', Thrasymachus says in his speech For the People of Larisa, 'Shall we become slaves to Archelaus, Greeks as we are, to a barbarian?'" Rauhut therefore declares it evident that Thrasymachus became most prominent in the last three decades of the 5th century.

Larissa

LarisaLarissa, GreeceArchbishop of Larissa
"And while Euripides says in the Telephus, 'Shall we who are Greeks be slaves to barbarians?', Thrasymachus says in his speech For the People of Larisa, 'Shall we become slaves to Archelaus, Greeks as we are, to a barbarian?'" Rauhut therefore declares it evident that Thrasymachus became most prominent in the last three decades of the 5th century.

Herodes Atticus

Lucius Vibullius Hipparchus Tiberius Claudius Atticus Herodes or Herodes AtticusLucius Vibullius Hipparchus Tiberius Claudius Atticus HerodesClaudius Herodes Marathonius
Dillon and Gergel posit the alternate possibility that the speech was composed by the 2nd-century CE Herodes Atticus, of whom we have extracts similar in spirit to Clement's fragment, and sound authentically 5th-century, exhibiting detailed knowledge of Thessalian politics.

Thessaly

ThessalianThessaliaThessalians
Dillon and Gergel posit the alternate possibility that the speech was composed by the 2nd-century CE Herodes Atticus, of whom we have extracts similar in spirit to Clement's fragment, and sound authentically 5th-century, exhibiting detailed knowledge of Thessalian politics.

Aristotle

AristotelianAristotelesAristote
There is a man by the same name mentioned in Aristotle's Politics who overthrew the democracy at Cyme, but nothing is known of this event, nor can it be said with any degree of certainty that they are the same man.

Politics (Aristotle)

PoliticsThe PoliticsPolitica
There is a man by the same name mentioned in Aristotle's Politics who overthrew the democracy at Cyme, but nothing is known of this event, nor can it be said with any degree of certainty that they are the same man.

Cyme (Aeolis)

CymeKymeAeolian Cyme
There is a man by the same name mentioned in Aristotle's Politics who overthrew the democracy at Cyme, but nothing is known of this event, nor can it be said with any degree of certainty that they are the same man.

Sophistical Refutations

On Sophistical RefutationsSophistici ElenchiDe sophisticis elenchis
Aristotle mentions a Thrasymachus again in his Sophistical Refutations, where he credits him with a pivotal role in the development of rhetorical theory.

Tisias

Quoting the W. A. Pickard-Cambridge text: "For it may be that in everything, as the saying is 'the first start is the main part'... This is in fact what has happened in regard to rhetorical speeches and to practically all the other arts: for those who discovered the beginnings of them advanced them in all only a little way, whereas the celebrities of to-day are the heirs (so to speak) of a long succession of men who have advanced them bit by bit, and so have developed them to their present form, Tisias coming next after the first founders, then Thrasymachus after Tisias, and Theodorus next to him, while several people have made their several contributions to it: and therefore it is not to be wondered at that the art has attained considerable dimensions."

Rhetoric (Aristotle)

RhetoricThe Art of Rhetoricars rhetorica
Writing more specifically in the Rhetoric, Aristotle attributes to Thrasymachus a witty simile.