Three Kingdoms of Korea

Three KingdomsThree Kingdoms periodKoreaKorean Three KingdomsThree Kingdoms eraKorean Three Kingdoms PeriodSamgukThree Kingdoms period of KoreaKorea's Three Kingdoms EraKorean kingdoms
The Three Kingdoms of Korea refers to the three kingdoms of Baekje, Silla and Goguryeo .wikipedia
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Baekje

PaekcheBaekje KingdomBaekjae
The Three Kingdoms of Korea refers to the three kingdoms of Baekje, Silla and Goguryeo .
It was one of the Three Kingdoms of Korea, together with Goguryeo and Silla.

Silla

Silla DynastySilla KingdomShilla
The Three Kingdoms of Korea refers to the three kingdoms of Baekje, Silla and Goguryeo . In the 7th century, allied with China under the Tang dynasty, Silla unified the Korean Peninsula for the first time in Korean history, forming a united Korean national identity for the first time.
Silla, along with Baekje and Goguryeo, formed the Three Kingdoms of Korea.

Goguryeo

KoguryoKoguryŏGoguryeo Kingdom
The Three Kingdoms of Korea refers to the three kingdoms of Baekje, Silla and Goguryeo . Goguryeo was later known as Goryeo, from which the modern name Korea is derived.
Along with Baekje and Silla, Goguryeo was one of the Three Kingdoms of Korea.

Korea

KoreanKorean PeninsulaSouth Korea
Goguryeo was later known as Goryeo, from which the modern name Korea is derived.
During the first half of the 1st millennium, Korea was divided between the three competing states of Goguryeo, Baekje, and Silla, together known as the "Three Kingdoms of Korea".

Balhae

Balhae KingdomBalhae EmpireBohai
Subsequently, Go of Balhae, a former Goguryeo general, founded Balhae in the former territory of Goguryeo after defeating the Tang dynasty at the Battle of Tianmenling.
Balhae was established by refugees from the fallen Korean kingdom of Goguryeo and Tungusic Mohe tribes in 698, when the first king, Dae Joyeong, defeated the Wu Zhou dynasty at Tianmenling.

Korean Peninsula

KoreapeninsulaKorean
The three kingdoms occupied the entire Korean Peninsula and roughly half of Manchuria, located in present-day China and Russia.
Meanwhile, in South Korea, it is called Hanbando, referring to the Samhan, specifically the Three Kingdoms of Korea, not the ancient confederacies in the southern Korean Peninsula.

South Korea

Republic of KoreaKoreaKOR
The "Han" in the names of the Korean Empire, Daehan Jeguk, and the Republic of Korea (South Korea), Daehan Minguk or Hanguk, are named in reference to the Three Kingdoms of Korea.
Following the unification of the Three Kingdoms of Korea into Silla and Balhae in the late 7th century, Korea was ruled by the Goryeo dynasty (918–1392) and the Joseon dynasty (1392–1897).

Samhan

HanProtohistoricProto-historic Korea
Beginning in the 7th century, the name "Samhan" became synonymous with the Three Kingdoms of Korea.
The name "Samhan" also refers to the Three Kingdoms of Korea.

Goryeo

Korea (Goryeo Kingdom)Goryeo DynastyKoryo
By the Goryeo period, Samhan became a common name to refer to all of Korea.
Goryeo achieved what has been called a "true national unification" by Korean historians as it not only unified the Later Three Kingdoms but also incorporated much of the ruling class of the northern kingdom of Balhae, who had origins in Goguryeo of the earlier Three Kingdoms of Korea.

Mahan confederacy

Mahanunrelated confederation
Goguryeo was alternately called Mahan by the Tang dynasty, as evidenced by a Tang document that called Goguryeo generals "Mahan leaders" in 645.
Baekje began as a member statelet, but later overtook all of Mahan and became one of the Three Kingdoms of Korea.

Korean Empire

KoreaEmpire of KoreaGreat Korean Empire
The "Han" in the names of the Korean Empire, Daehan Jeguk, and the Republic of Korea (South Korea), Daehan Minguk or Hanguk, are named in reference to the Three Kingdoms of Korea.
The name, literally meaning "Great Han Empire", was derived from Samhan, specifically the Three Kingdoms of Korea (not the ancient confederacies in the southern Korean Peninsula), in the tradition of naming new states after historic states (Gubon Sincham, Hanja: 舊本新參, Hangul: 구본신참).

Jangsu of Goguryeo

JangsuKing JangsuTaewang Jangsu
The state was at its zenith in the fifth century, during the rule of King Gwanggaeto the Great and his son King Jangsu, and particularly during their campaign in Manchuria.
Jangsu of Goguryeo (394–491, r. 413–491) was the 20th monarch of Goguryeo, the northernmost of the Three Kingdoms of Korea.

Buyeo

Buyeo kingdomBukbuyeoFuyu
The Three Kingdoms period is defined as being from 57 BC to 668 AD (but there existed about 78 tribal states in the southern region of the Korean peninsula and relatively big states like Okjeo, Buyeo, and Dongye in its northern part and Manchuria).
Both Goguryeo and Baekje, two of the Three Kingdoms of Korea, considered themselves Buyeo's successors.

Tang dynasty

TangTang ChinaTang Empire
Subsequently, Go of Balhae, a former Goguryeo general, founded Balhae in the former territory of Goguryeo after defeating the Tang dynasty at the Battle of Tianmenling. In the 7th century, allied with China under the Tang dynasty, Silla unified the Korean Peninsula for the first time in Korean history, forming a united Korean national identity for the first time. After the establishment of the Sui Dynasty and later the Tang Dynasty in China, the state continued to take aggressive actions against China, Silla, and Baekje until it was conquered by allied Silla–Tang forces in 668.
Besides political hegemony, the Tang also exerted a powerful cultural influence over neighboring East Asian states such as those in Japan and Korea.

Dongmyeong of Goguryeo

JumongKing DongmyeongDongmyeong
Two sons of the founder of Goguryeo are recorded to have fled a succession conflict, to establish Baekje around the present Seoul area.
King Dongmyeong of Goguryeo (58 BCE – 19 BCE, r. 37 BCE – 19 BCE) or Dongmyeongseongwang, which literally means Holy King of the East, also known by his birth name Jumong, was the founding monarch of the kingdom of Goguryeo, the northernmost of the Three Kingdoms of Korea.

Seoul

Seoul, South KoreaSeoul, KoreaHanseong
Two sons of the founder of Goguryeo are recorded to have fled a succession conflict, to establish Baekje around the present Seoul area. Goguryeo eventually occupied the Liaodong Plains in Manchuria and today's Seoul area.
Strategically situated along the Han River, Seoul's history stretches back over two thousand years, when it was founded in 18 BCE by the people of Baekje, one of the Three Kingdoms of Korea.

Pyongyang

P'yŏngyangPyeongyangPyongyang, North Korea
Goguryeo, eventually the largest of the three kingdoms, had several capitals in alternation: two capitals in the upper Yalu area, and later Nangrang (Lelang in Chinese) which is now part of Pyongyang.
The area around the city was called Nanglang during the early Three Kingdoms period.

Proto–Three Kingdoms of Korea

Proto–Three Kingdoms periodProto–Three KingdomsProto Three Kingdoms
The predecessor period, before the development of the full-fledged kingdoms, is sometimes called Proto–Three Kingdoms period.
It is a subdivision of what is traditionally called Korea's Three Kingdoms Period and covers the first three centuries of the Common Era, corresponding to the later phase of the Korean Iron Age.

Gwanggaeto the Great

GwanggaetoGwanggaeto the Great of GoguryeoKing Gwanggaeto the Great
The state was at its zenith in the fifth century, during the rule of King Gwanggaeto the Great and his son King Jangsu, and particularly during their campaign in Manchuria.
In regard to the Korean peninsula, Gwanggaeto defeated Baekje, the then most powerful of the Three Kingdoms of Korea, in 396, capturing the capital city of Wiryeseong in present-day Seoul.

Korean influence on Japanese culture

continental culture to Japanexchanges of cultures and ideasKorean influence on Japanese art
Baekje was a great maritime power; its nautical skill, which made it the Phoenicia of East Asia, was instrumental in the dissemination of Buddhism throughout East Asia and continental culture to Japan.
Cultural contact with Korea, which at the time was divided into several independent states, played a decisive role in the development of Japanese government and society both during the Kofun period and the subsequent Classical period.

Geunchogo of Baekje

GeunchogoKing GeunchogoSiege of Pyongyang (371)
Baekje was once a great military power on the Korean Peninsula, especially during the time of Geunchogo, but was critically defeated by Gwanggaeto and declined.
Geunchogo of Baekje (324–375, r. 346–375) was the 13th king of Baekje, one of the Three Kingdoms of Korea.

Samguk sagi

History of the Three KingdomsSamguksagiHistorical Record of the Three Kingdoms
Main primary sources for this period include Samguk sagi and Samguk yusa in Korea, and the "Eastern Barbarians" section from the Book of Wei of the Records of the Three Kingdoms in China.
Samguk sagi (삼국사기, 三國史記, History of the Three Kingdoms) is a historical record of the Three Kingdoms of Korea: Goguryeo, Baekje and Silla.

Dongye

YeWaiYe (Korea)
The Three Kingdoms period is defined as being from 57 BC to 668 AD (but there existed about 78 tribal states in the southern region of the Korean peninsula and relatively big states like Okjeo, Buyeo, and Dongye in its northern part and Manchuria).

Sui dynasty

SuiSui ChinaSui Empire
After the establishment of the Sui Dynasty and later the Tang Dynasty in China, the state continued to take aggressive actions against China, Silla, and Baekje until it was conquered by allied Silla–Tang forces in 668.
After a series of costly and disastrous military campaigns against Goguryeo, one of the Three Kingdoms of Korea, ended in defeat by 614, the dynasty disintegrated under a series of popular revolts culminating in the assassination of Emperor Yang by his ministers in 618.

Korean architecture

architectureArchitecture of KoreaDaemokjang
Baekje played a fundamental role in transmitting cultural and material developments to ancient Japan, including Chinese written characters, Chinese and Korean literature, technologies such as ferrous metallurgy and ceramics, architectural styles, sericulture and Buddhism.
Goguryeo, the largest kingdom among the Three Kingdoms of Korea, is renowned for its mountain fortresses built horizontally and vertically along the incline of slopes.