Thule

Ultima Thulemythical northern countryAncient Greek wordEschate ThuleThulian
Thule ( Thoúlē, Thūlē) is the farthest north location mentioned in ancient Greek and Roman literature and cartography.wikipedia
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Saaremaa

ÖselOeselØsel
Modern interpretations have included Orkney, Shetland, the island of Saaremaa (Ösel) in Estonia, and the Norwegian island of Smøla. Another hypothesis, first proposed by Lennart Meri in 1976, holds that the island of Saaremaa (which is often known by the exonym Osel) in Estonia, could be Thule.
Saaremaa is believed by Estonian scholar Raul Talvik and former Estonian president Lennart Meri to have been the historic Ultima Thule.

Thule Air Base

ThuleThule ABThule Air Force Base
Thule has given its name to the northernmost United States Air Force airfield, Thule Air Base in northwest Greenland, and to the smaller lobe of Kuiper belt object 486958 Arrokoth, visited by the New Horizons spacecraft.
The name Thule comes from, a place name dating to the third-century BC for a land believed by the Greeks to lie to the north of Britain.

Pytheas

Pytheas of MassaliaPytheas of MassiliaPythéas
The Greek explorer Pytheas of Massalia (now Marseille, France) is the first to have written of Thule, after his travels between 330 and 320 BC.
Pytheas introduced the idea of distant Thule to the geographic imagination, and his account of the tides is the earliest one known that suggests the moon as their cause.

Shetland

Shetland IslandsShetland IslesShetlands
Modern interpretations have included Orkney, Shetland, the island of Saaremaa (Ösel) in Estonia, and the Norwegian island of Smøla.
After describing the discovery and conquest of Orkney, he wrote that the Roman fleet had seen "Thule, too".

486958 Arrokoth

ArrokothPT1Snowman (asteroid)
Thule has given its name to the northernmost United States Air Force airfield, Thule Air Base in northwest Greenland, and to the smaller lobe of Kuiper belt object 486958 Arrokoth, visited by the New Horizons spacecraft.
It is named after the Latin phrase ultima Thule (literally "farthest Thule"), an expression referencing the most distant place beyond the borders of the known world.

Qaanaaq

Thule, GreenlandThule
In 1910, the explorer Knud Rasmussen established a missionary and trading post in north-western Greenland, which he named "Thule" (later Qaanaaq).
He called the site "Thule" after classical ultima Thule; the Inuit called it Umanaq ("heart-shaped"), and the site is commonly called "Dundas" today.

Knud Rasmussen

RasmussenThule ExpeditionFifth Thule Expedition
In 1910, the explorer Knud Rasmussen established a missionary and trading post in north-western Greenland, which he named "Thule" (later Qaanaaq). In 1910, the explorer Knud Rasmussen established a missionary and trading post, which he named Thule (Inuit: Avanaa) on Greenland.
The name Thule was chosen because it was the most northerly trading post in the world, literally the "Ultima Thule".

Smøla (island)

Smølaisland of Smøla
Modern interpretations have included Orkney, Shetland, the island of Saaremaa (Ösel) in Estonia, and the Norwegian island of Smøla.
The scientists believe that, when one compensates for these mistakes, the mythological location Thule corresponds to the island of Smøla.

Thule people

ThuleThule cultureThule Tradition
The Thule people, the predecessor of modern Inuit Greenlanders, were named after the Thule region.
The appellation "Thule" originates from the location of Thule (relocated and renamed Qaanaaq in 1953) in northwest Greenland, facing Canada, where the archaeological remains of the people were first found at Comer's Midden.

Thule Island

Morell IslandMorrellMorrell Island
The name is now used for a group of three southernmost islands in the South Sandwich Islands, one of which is called Thule Island.
It is named, on account of its remote location, after the mythical land of Thule, said by ancient geographers to lie at the extreme end of the Earth.

Geographica

GeographyGeographikaStrabo
Strabo, in his Geographica (c.

Lennart Meri

Lennart Georg MeriPresident Lennart Meri
Another hypothesis, first proposed by Lennart Meri in 1976, holds that the island of Saaremaa (which is often known by the exonym Osel) in Estonia, could be Thule.
Hõbevalge is based on a wide-ranging ancient seafaring sources, and carefully unveils the secret of the legendary Ultima Thule.

Thulium

Tm
Thule lends its name to the 69th element in the periodic table, thulium.
Cleve named the oxide thulia and its element thulium after Thule, an Ancient Greek place name associated with Scandinavia or Iceland.

Ultima Thule

Ultima Thule (disambiguation)
Thule is referred to in Goethe's poem "Der König in Thule" (1774), famously set to music by Franz Schubert (D 367, 1816), Franz Liszt (S.531) and Robert Schumann (Op.67, No.1), and in the collection Ultima Thule (1880) by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow.

Southern Thule

South ThuleArgentine "scientists" landed
In 1775, during his second voyage, Captain Cook named an island in the high southern latitudes of the South Atlantic Ocean, Southern Thule.
The island group was first sighted in 1775 by the expedition of James Cook, who named it Southern Thule because it seemed to lie at very much the extreme end of the world (see Ultima Thule).

Prince Valiant

ValiantArncomic strip
Hal Foster's protagonist Prince Valiant gets his title from being the son of Aguar, exiled king of Thule who has taken refuge in the Fens during the days of King Arthur.
Valiant (Val) is a Nordic prince from Thule, located near present day Trondheim on the Norwegian coast.

Dicuil

Irish monk Dicuil
Other late classical writers and post-classical writers, such as Orosius (384–420) and the Irish monk Dicuil (late eighth and early ninth century), describe Thule as being north and west of both Ireland and Britain, strongly suggesting that it was Iceland.
Among their claims are the perpetual day at midsummer in "Thule," where there was then "no darkness to hinder one from doing what one would."

Der König in Thule

367King of Thule
Thule is referred to in Goethe's poem "Der König in Thule" (1774), famously set to music by Franz Schubert (D 367, 1816), Franz Liszt (S.531) and Robert Schumann (Op.67, No.1), and in the collection Ultima Thule (1880) by Henry Wadsworth Longfellow.
Under Herder's influence, the setting was changed to the mythical island kingdom Thule, which was thought to be the northernmost place Greek seafarers ventured in antiquity.

Thule Society

ThuleThule-GesellschaftThule Gesellschaft
The Thule Society, which had close links to the Deutsche Arbeiter Partei (DAP), known later as the Nationalsozialistische Deutsche Arbeiterpartei (NSDAP or Nazi party) was, according to its own account, founded on August18, 1918.
The Thule Society (Thule-Gesellschaft), originally the Studiengruppe für germanisches Altertum ("Study Group for Germanic Antiquity"), was a German occultist and völkisch group founded in Munich right after World War I, named after a mythical northern country in Greek legend.

Kaali crater

KaaliKaali meteoritedisaster
A crater lake named Kaali on the island appears to be have been formed by a meteor strike in prehistory.
According to a theory first proposed by Lennart Meri, it is possible that Saaremaa was the legendary Thule island, first mentioned by ancient Greek geographer Pytheas, whereas the name "Thule" could have been connected to the Finnic word tule ("(of) fire") and the folklore of Estonia, which depicts the birth of the crater lake in Kaali.

Phantom island

phantom islandsphantom reefphantom
Thule was perhaps actually discovered in the 4th century BC by the Greek explorer Pytheas but was lost, and then later reidentified by ancient explorers and geographers as either the Shetland Islands, Iceland, Scandinavia, or even as nonexistent.

Hyperborea

HyperboreansHyperboreanArctic continent
In Germany, extreme-right occultists believed in a historical Thule, or Hyperborea, as the ancient origin of the "Aryan race" (a term which they believed had been used by the Proto-Indo-European people).
Along with Thule, Hyperborea was one of several terrae incognitae to the Greeks and Romans, where Pliny, Pindar and Herodotus, as well as Virgil and Cicero, reported that people lived to the age of one thousand and enjoyed lives of complete happiness.

Avannaa

North GreenlandAvanersuaqNordgronland
In 1910, the explorer Knud Rasmussen established a missionary and trading post, which he named Thule (Inuit: Avanaa) on Greenland.

The Fortunes of Richard Mahony

Ultima ThuleAustralia FelixThe Fortunes of Richard Mahony: Australia Felix
Ultima Thule is the title of the 1929 novel by Henry Handel Richardson, set in colonial Australia.
He calls his new home, that he believes will be his last, Ultima Thule.

Joanna Kavenna

Along the way, Kavenna investigates various myths and travellers' yarns about the northerly regions, focusing particularly on the ancient Greek story of Thule, the last land in the North.