Tianjin

1913 map of Tianjin
Church of Our Lady's Victories, built in 1869, was the site of the Tianjin Church Massacre.
Peiyang University, established 1895
Tung Lai Bank building on Heping Road, built in 1930
Major crossing (Rue Général Foch and Rue de Chaylard) of downtown Tientsin in French concession
Asahi Street (now Heping Road) in 1939 Tianjin flood
P.R.China's 10th anniversary parade in Tianjin in 1959
Tianjin Eye
Monument of TEDA
Population density and low elevation coastal zones in the Tianjin area. Tianjin is particularly vulnerable to sea level rise.
Tianjin (labeled as T'IEN-CHIN (TIENTSIN) 天津) (1955)
Map of the Hai River Basin
2011 satellite image of Tianjin. The city center was on the left, while the smaller urban area to the right was the Binhai New Area.
Hai River in 2011
Airport Industrial Park, Dongli District
Then-Premier Wen Jiabao, himself a Tianjin native, and Klaus Schwab at the Annual Meeting of the New Champions of World Economic Forum in Tianjin, 2010
Tianjin city center
Tianjin Economic and Technological Development Area
US Congresswoman Nancy Pelosi visiting a Tianjin Qingyuan Electric Vehicle factory in 2009
Old Guanyinhao Bank
Crosstalk in Tianjin
Nankai University
Jingwei Tries to Fill the Sea, the dome mural of Tianjin railway station
Tianjin Binhai International Airport Terminal 1 and 2
Port of Tianjin pilot boat berth
The TEDA Modern Guided Rail Tram is one of the two rubber tire tram systems in Asia
The Tianjin Metro near Liuyuan station
Tianjin railway station
Tianjin West railway station
Tianjin Bus Route 606
A Mazu temple in Tianjin
House decorated by more than seven hundred million pieces of ceramic
Tianjin Museum
Tianjin Italian Town
Tianjin Olympic Center Stadium, Nankai District
Tianjin Juilliard School in Binhai,Tianjin

Municipality and a coastal metropolis in Northern China on the shore of the Bohai Sea.

- Tianjin
1913 map of Tianjin

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The Mahavira Hall at Zhenru Temple, built in 1320

Shanghai

One of the four direct-administered municipalities of the People's Republic of China.

One of the four direct-administered municipalities of the People's Republic of China.

The Mahavira Hall at Zhenru Temple, built in 1320
The walled Old City of Shanghai in the 17th century
A map of Shanghai in 1884; Chinese area are in yellow, French in red, British in blue, American in orange.
The dismantlement of Old City walls, 1911
Zhabei District on fire, 1937
Jewish refugee students in Shanghai
Nanjing Road, 1967 during the Cultural Revolution
The urban area of Shanghai in 2016, along with its major islands. From northwest to southeast: Chongming, Changxing, Hengsha, and the Jiuduansha shoals off Pudong. The Yangtze's natural sediment discharge can be seen.
Population density and low elevation coastal zones in the Shanghai area. Shanghai is particularly vulnerable to sea level rise.
Site of the First National Congress of the Chinese Communist Party, a typical shikumen building in the former French Concession
Shanghai World Financial Center (left) and Jin Mao Tower (right)
Shanghai Municipal Government building
Map of central Shanghai
The Port of Shanghai
The Shanghai Stock Exchange is one of the largest stock exchanges in the world by market capitalization.
The F-22P frigate built by Hudong-Zhonghua for the Pakistan Navy
The Nanjing Pedestrian Street in the evening, with the Radisson New World Hotel in the background
Bird's-eye view of the golden pagoda of Jing'an Temple
The St. Ignatius Cathedral
Shanghai Jiao Tong University Library
University City District in Songjiang
The Shanghai Metro is the longest metro system in the world.
Shanghai Metro Network
A maglev train leaving Pudong International Airport
BRT line 71 on the Bund
Interchange between Yan'an Elevated Road and North–South Elevated Road
Bicycle-sharing systems, such as ofo (yellow) and Mobike (orange), are common in Shanghai.
A CR400AF bullet train departing from Shanghai railway station
Inside Shanghai Pudong International Airport Terminal 1
Due to Yangshan Port, Shanghai has become the world's busiest container port.
Shanghai Citi Bank Building operates a light show, shining the phrase "I love Shanghai".
The China Art Museum, located in Pudong
Tomato paste replaces beetroot in Shanghai-style borscht.
十万图之四 (No. 4 of a Hundred Thousand Scenes) by Ren Xiong, a pioneer of the Shanghai School of Chinese art, c. 1850
Mei Lanfang performing the Peking opera "Resisting the Jin Army" at Tianchan Theatre
In this Shanghainese soap advertisement from the 1930s, two women are wearing Shanghai-styled qipao while playing golf.
F1 Chinese Grand Prix in Shanghai
Yao Ming was born in Shanghai. He started his career with the Shanghai Sharks.
Shanghai Masters in Qizhong Forest Sports City Arena
Statue of the Good Eighth Company on the Nanjing Road, People's Square
Enchanted Storybook Castle of Shanghai Disneyland
Huangpu District during the 2013 Eastern China smog.
A residual waste truck and a kitchen waste truck on Zhonghua Road
The Russian Consulate General in Shanghai, located on the banks of the Suzhou River
Skyline of Shanghai Pudong at night, September 2021
The Bund in the late 1920s seen from the French Concession
Nanking Road (modern-day East Nanjing Road) in the 1930s
Shanghai Park Hotel was the tallest building in Asia for decades
Former Shanghai Library
The HSBC Building built in 1923 and the Customs House built in 1927
The Shanghai Museum
The Shanghai Grand Theater
The Shanghai Exhibition Center, an example of Stalinist architecture
The Oriental Pearl Tower at night
Shanghai Tower

Under the new People's Republic of China (PRC), Shanghai was one of only three municipalities not merged into neighboring provinces (the others being Beijing and Tianjin).

Boxer Rebellion and Eight-Nation Alliance, China 1900–1901

Boxer Rebellion

Anti-foreign, anti-colonial, and anti-Christian uprising in China between 1899 and 1901, towards the end of the Qing dynasty, by the Society of Righteous and Harmonious Fists, known as the "Boxers" in English because many of its members had practised Chinese martial arts, which at the time were referred to as "Chinese boxing".

Anti-foreign, anti-colonial, and anti-Christian uprising in China between 1899 and 1901, towards the end of the Qing dynasty, by the Society of Righteous and Harmonious Fists, known as the "Boxers" in English because many of its members had practised Chinese martial arts, which at the time were referred to as "Chinese boxing".

Boxer Rebellion and Eight-Nation Alliance, China 1900–1901
Boxer with spear and sword
(Wax Model by George S. Stuart)
A French political propaganda cartoon depicting China as a pie about to be carved up by Queen Victoria (Britain), Kaiser Wilhelm II (Germany), Tsar Nicholas II (Russia), Marianne (France) and a samurai (Japan), while Boxer leader Dong Fuxiang protests.
Chinese Muslim troops from Gansu, also known as the Gansu Braves, killed a Japanese diplomat on 11 June 1900. Foreigners called them the "10,000 Islamic rabble."
Japanese marines who served in the Seymour Expedition
Admiral Seymour returning to Tianjin with his wounded men on 26 June
Italian mounted infantry near Tientsin in 1900
Qing imperial soldiers during the Boxer Rebellion
Locations of foreign diplomatic legations and front lines in Beijing during the siege
Capture of the Forts at Taku [Dagu], by Fritz Neumann
Representative U.S., Indian, French, Italian, British, German, Austro-Hungarian and Japanese military and naval personnel in the Allied forces
1900, soldiers burned down the Temple, Shanhaiguan. The destruction of a Chinese temple on the bank of the Pei-Ho, by Amédée Forestier
Han Chinese general Nie Shicheng, who fought both the Boxers and the Allies
Boxer soldiers
Han Chinese general Dong Fuxiang whose Moslem "Gansu Braves" besieged the Legations.
The Boxers bombarded Tianjin in June 1900, and Dong Fuxiang's Muslim troops attacked the British Admiral Seymour and his expeditionary force.
The capture of the southern gate of Tianjin. British troops were positioned on the left, Japanese troops at the centre, French troops on the right.
Chinese troops wearing modern uniforms in 1900
Indian troops at the Temple of Heaven. They were the first to enter the Legation Quarter.
Japanese woodblock print depicting troops of the Eight-Nation Alliance.
Russian officers in Manchuria during the Boxer Rebellion
The Holy Chinese Martyrs of the Eastern Orthodox Church as depicted in an icon commissioned in 1990
The Russian empire occupied Manchuria while the Eight Nation Alliance jointly occupied Zhili province. The rest of China outside of Manchuria and Zhili were unaffected due to the governor generals who participated in the Mutual Protection of Southeast China in 1900.
French troops execute a Boxer
Execution of Boxers by standing strangulation
American troops during the Boxer Rebellion
French 1901 China expedition commemorative medal. Musée de la Légion d'Honneur.
Foreign armies assemble inside the Forbidden City after capturing Beijing, 28 November 1900
"Boxers" captured by the U.S. 6th Cavalry near Tianjin in 1901. Historians believed they were merely bystanders.
Qing forces of Chinese soldiers in 1899–1901.
Left: two infantrymen of the New Imperial Army. Front: drum major of the regular army. Seated on the trunk: field artilleryman. Right: Boxers.
A Boxer during the revolt
U.S. Marines fight rebellious Boxers outside Beijing Legation Quarter, 1900. Copy of painting by Sergeant John Clymer.
British and Japanese forces engage Boxers in battle.

An Eight Nation Alliance of American, Austro-Hungarian, British, French, German, Italian, Japanese and Russian troops moved into China to lift the siege and on June 17 stormed the Dagu Fort, at Tianjin.

Huimin Yuan Apartments, Zhengtai Li, Lunan, Tangshan, Hebei

Tangshan

Coastal, industrial prefecture-level city in the northeast of Hebei province.

Coastal, industrial prefecture-level city in the northeast of Hebei province.

Huimin Yuan Apartments, Zhengtai Li, Lunan, Tangshan, Hebei
The Caofeidian Port
Tangshan Museum
Eastern Tombs of the Qing Dynasty
The Anti-seismic Monument
The Pagoda in the Site of Tiangong Temple
Tangshan Railway Station

The city faces the Bohai Sea in the south, the Yan Mountains in the north, Qinhuangdao across the Luan River to the east, and Tianjin to the west.

A ceremonial jade cong of the Liangzhu culture.

Hangzhou

Capital and most populous city of Zhejiang, People's Republic of China.

Capital and most populous city of Zhejiang, People's Republic of China.

A ceremonial jade cong of the Liangzhu culture.
West Lake
Hangzhou CBD
A satellite image of the Yangtze River Delta. The Yangtze's natural sediment discharge can be seen.
A mansion in Nanshan Road, Hangzhou
Zhejiang Stock Exchange in the Qianjiang Central Business District
Alibaba Group Headquarters
West Lake and Leifeng Pagoda
West Lake at night
Hu Xueyan Residence, a historic mansion in Hangzhou
Chenghuangmiao located on Wushan, Hangzhou
Gilt silver Hōkyōintō Unearthed from Leifeng Pagoda Site, now in the Zhejiang Provincial Museum
Xihu Longjing (西湖龙井), Longjing tea planted near the West Lake
Leifeng Pagoda
Xi Hu Landscape by Li Song (1190–1264), showing the Leifeng Pagoda in the Southern Song Dynasty.
"Moon over the Peaceful Lake in Autumn", one of the Ten Scenes of the Xi Hu
Dreaming of the Tiger Spring, the burial place of monk Jigong.

According to the Globalization and World Cities Research Network (GaWC), the city is classified as Beta (global second-tier) city, together with Chongqing, Nanjing and Tianjin in China.

The eight nations with their naval ensigns, from top to bottom, left to right: Regia Marina, 🇺🇸 United States Navy,  French National Navy,, , ,  Imperial Russian Navy and . Japanese print, 1900.

Eight-Nation Alliance

Multinational military coalition that invaded northern China in 1900 with the stated aim of relieving the foreign legations in Beijing, then besieged by the popular Boxer militia, who were determined to remove foreign imperialism in China.

Multinational military coalition that invaded northern China in 1900 with the stated aim of relieving the foreign legations in Beijing, then besieged by the popular Boxer militia, who were determined to remove foreign imperialism in China.

The eight nations with their naval ensigns, from top to bottom, left to right: Regia Marina, 🇺🇸 United States Navy,  French National Navy,, , ,  Imperial Russian Navy and . Japanese print, 1900.
German and Japanese soldiers witnessing the street execution of a Chinese boxer.
Indian troops during the Boxer Rebellion.
German and Indian troops, Peking Legation Quarter, 1900.
German troops with captured Boxer flags.
French Colonial Infantry Marching through the French Concession, Tientsin
Postcard showing Waldersee inspecting Italian troops.
Japanese marines who served under the British commander Edward Hobart Seymour.
Russian troops during the Boxer Rebellion
American troops during the Boxer Rebellion.

On 14 August 1900, the allies marched to Beijing from Tianjin to relieve the Legation Quarter siege.

Mandarin Chinese

Group of Sinitic languages and dialects that are natively spoken across most of northern and southwestern China.

Group of Sinitic languages and dialects that are natively spoken across most of northern and southwestern China.

Mandarin Chinese is not listed in the UNESCO Atlas of the World's Languages in Danger. It is classified as being safe from endagerment.
A page of the Menggu Ziyun, covering the syllables tsim to lim
Zhongguo Guanhua (中國官話), or Medii Regni Communis Loquela ("Middle Kingdom's Common Speech"), used on the frontispiece of an early Chinese grammar published by Étienne Fourmont (with Arcadio Huang) in 1742
Distribution of the eight subgroups of Mandarin plus Jin Chinese, which many linguists include as part of Mandarin, according to the Language Atlas of China (1987)

However, long-established cities even very close to Beijing, such as Tianjin, Baoding, Shenyang, and Dalian, have markedly different dialects.

The Song dynasty at its greatest extent in 1111

Song dynasty

Imperial dynasty of China that began in 960 and lasted until 1279.

Imperial dynasty of China that began in 960 and lasted until 1279.

The Song dynasty at its greatest extent in 1111
Emperor Taizu of Song (960–976), a court portrait painting
A portrait of Emperor Taizong of Song ( 976–997)
A wooden Bodhisattva from the Song dynasty (960–1279).
A Liao dynasty polychrome wood-carved statue of Guan Yin, Shanxi Province, China, (907–1125)
A portrait of Emperor Gaozong of Song (r. 1127–1162)
Southern Song in 1142. The western and southern borders remain unchanged from the previous map. However, the north of the Qinling Huaihe Line was under the control of the Jin dynasty. The Xia dynasty's territory generally remained unchanged. In the southwest, the Song dynasty bordered a territory about a sixth its size, the Dali dynasty.
Emperor Taizu of Song, Emperor Taizong of Song, prime minister Zhao Pu and other ministers playing Cuju, an early form of football, by Qian Xuan (1235–1305)
A 12th-century painting by Su Hanchen; a girl waves a peacock feather banner like the one used in dramatical theater to signal an acting leader of troops.
The Donglin Academy, an educational institution equivalent to modern-day college. It was originally built in 1111 during the Northern Song dynasty.
Traction trebuchet on an Early Song Dynasty warship from the Wujing Zongyao. Trebuchets like this were used to launch the earliest type of explosive bombs.
Armoured Song cavalry
The Liaodi Pagoda, the tallest pre-modern Chinese pagoda, built in 1055; it was intended as a Buddhist religious structure, yet served a military purpose as a watchtower for reconnaissance.
Chinese calligraphy of mixed styles written by Song dynasty poet Mi Fu (1051–1107)
Portrait of the Chinese Zen Buddhist Wuzhun Shifan, painted in 1238 AD.
Dried jujubes such as these were imported to Song China from South Asia and the Middle East. An official from Canton was invited to the home of an Arab merchant, and described the jujube as thus: "This fruit is the color of sugar, its skin and its pulp are sweet, and it gives the impression, when you eat it, of having first been cooked in the oven and then allowed to dry."
Earliest known written formula for gunpowder, from the Wujing Zongyao of 1044 AD.
Facsimile of Zhu Shijie's Jade Mirror of Four Unknowns
The Yu Ji Tu, or "Map of the Tracks of Yu", carved into stone in 1137, located in the Stele Forest of Xi'an. This 3 ft squared map features a graduated scale of 100 li for each rectangular grid. China's coastline and river systems are clearly defined and precisely pinpointed on the map. Yu refers to the Chinese deity described in the geographical chapter of the Book of Documents, dated 5th–3rd centuries BCE.
A plan and side view of a canal pound lock, a concept pioneered in 984 by the Assistant Commissioner of Transport for Huainan, the engineer Qiao Weiyo.
are lines of Song dynasty stone statues
Scholars of the Song dynasty claim to have collected ancient relics dating back as far as the Shang dynasty, such as this bronze ding vessel.

The Song dynasty used military force in an attempt to quell the Liao dynasty and to recapture the Sixteen Prefectures, a territory under Khitan control since 938 that was traditionally considered to be part of China proper (Most parts of today's Beijing and Tianjin).

Incheon

City located in northwestern South Korea, bordering Seoul and Gyeonggi to the east.

City located in northwestern South Korea, bordering Seoul and Gyeonggi to the east.

Jemulpo in 1890
Inside Incheon International Airport
Administrative divisions
Incheon Asiad Main Stadium, main stadium of 2014 Asian Games
Monument to 100 years of friendship between Korea and the US in Jayu Park
The statue of MacArthur at Jayu Park
A walkway in Jayu Park
The only official Chinatown in South Korea
Peking Opera wall Chinatown, Incheon, South Korea
Korean-chinese cultural center Chinatown in South Korea
Songwol-dong Fairy Tale Village in Incheon in South Korea
Port of Incheon
Incheon Bridge
The tiny island of Jakyakdo
Wolmido promenade
{{ill|Incheon City Hall|ko|인천광역시청}}

The International Passenger Terminal located at the port offers ferries to five cities in China: Dalian, Qingdao, Tianjin, Dandong, and Weihai.

Map of China's prefectural level divisions

Administrative divisions of China

The administrative divisions of China have consisted of several levels since ancient times, due to China's large population and geographical area.

The administrative divisions of China have consisted of several levels since ancient times, due to China's large population and geographical area.

Map of China's prefectural level divisions
Map of China's county-level divisions
The Qing dynasty in 1820, with provinces in yellow, military governorates and protectorates in light yellow, tributary states in orange

Examples are Pudong, Shanghai and Binhai, Tianjin.

Evolution of the Tianjin Metro

Tianjin Metro

Evolution of the Tianjin Metro
Metro sign at Yingkoudao station
800px
Shuanglin station of Line 1
Binhaiguojijichang station of Line 2
Yingkoudao station of Line 3
Xiawafang station of Line 5
Tanggu station of Line 9
Joint Academy station of TEDA Line
Entrance to Xinanjiao station
800px

The Tianjin Metro or Tianjin Rail Transit is the rapid transit system in the city of Tianjin, which was the second city in mainland China after Beijing to operate a subway system (the Beijing Subway opened in 1971).