Tiberian Hebrew

TiberianT.H.Tib.
Tiberian Hebrew is the canonical pronunciation of the Hebrew Bible or Tanakh committed to writing by Masoretic scholars living in the Jewish community of Tiberias in ancient Galilee c.wikipedia
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Niqqud

vowel pointsvocalizationnikkud
They wrote in the form of Tiberian vocalization, which employed diacritics added to the Hebrew letters: vowel signs and consonant diacritics (nequdot) and the so-called accents (two related systems of cantillation signs or te'amim).
The most widespread system, and the only one still used to a significant degree today, was created by the Masoretes of Tiberias in the second half of the first millennium AD in the Land of Israel (see Masoretic Text, Tiberian Hebrew).

Aaron ben Moses ben Asher

Aaron ben AsherBen AsherBen-Asher
Aaron ben Moses ben Asher (Hebrew: ; Tiberian Hebrew: ʾAhărôn ben Mōšeh benʾĀšēr; 10th century, died c.960) was a Jewish scribe who lived in Tiberias in northern Israel and refined the Tiberian system of writing vowel sounds in Hebrew, which is still in use today, and serves as the basis for grammatical analysis.

Tiberian vocalization

TiberianTiberian HebrewTiberian system
They wrote in the form of Tiberian vocalization, which employed diacritics added to the Hebrew letters: vowel signs and consonant diacritics (nequdot) and the so-called accents (two related systems of cantillation signs or te'amim).
While the Tiberian system was devised for Tiberian Hebrew, it has become the dominant system for vocalizing all forms of Hebrew and has long since eclipsed the Babylonian and Palestinian vocalization systems.

Tiberias

TabariyyaTiberias, IsraelTverya
Tiberian Hebrew is the canonical pronunciation of the Hebrew Bible or Tanakh committed to writing by Masoretic scholars living in the Jewish community of Tiberias in ancient Galilee c.
One of the leading members of the Tiberian masoretic community was Aaron ben Moses ben Asher, who refined the oral tradition now known as Tiberian Hebrew.

Hebrew language

HebrewHebrew grammarHeb.
The most important is Tiberian Hebrew or Masoretic Hebrew, a local dialect of Tiberias in Galilee that became the standard for vocalizing the Hebrew Bible and thus still influences all other regional dialects of Hebrew.

Tzere

ZeiretsereTzeire
There was a distinction in Tiberian Hebrew between segol and Tzere.

Rafe

ֿ raphe
It originated with the Tiberian Masoretes as part of the extended system of niqqud (vowel points), and has the opposite meaning to dagesh qal, showing that one of the letters בגדכפת is to be pronounced as a fricative and not as a plosive, or (sometimes) that a consonant is single and not double; or, as the opposite to a mappiq, to show that the letters ה or א are silent (mater lectionis).

Phoenician language

PhoenicianPhoenician-PunicPhenician-Punic
This last case has similarities with phenomena occurring in the Samaritan pronunciation and the Phoenician language.
The Proto-Northwest Semitic and became not merely as in Tiberian Hebrew, but.

Kamatz

qamatzReduced KamatzKamatz katan

Hiriq

Holam

CholamHolam Haserholam male

Segol

Reduced Segolhataf segolHATEF SEGOL

Patach

patahReduced Patachpataḥ

Pronunciation

pronouncedpronouncepronouncing
Tiberian Hebrew is the canonical pronunciation of the Hebrew Bible or Tanakh committed to writing by Masoretic scholars living in the Jewish community of Tiberias in ancient Galilee c.

Hebrew Bible

TanakhbiblicalHebrew Scriptures
Tiberian Hebrew is the canonical pronunciation of the Hebrew Bible or Tanakh committed to writing by Masoretic scholars living in the Jewish community of Tiberias in ancient Galilee c.

Masoretes

MasoreteMasoreticMasorites
Tiberian Hebrew is the canonical pronunciation of the Hebrew Bible or Tanakh committed to writing by Masoretic scholars living in the Jewish community of Tiberias in ancient Galilee c.

Jews

JewishJewJewish people
Tiberian Hebrew is the canonical pronunciation of the Hebrew Bible or Tanakh committed to writing by Masoretic scholars living in the Jewish community of Tiberias in ancient Galilee c.

Galilee

Western GalileeGalileanGalilea
Tiberian Hebrew is the canonical pronunciation of the Hebrew Bible or Tanakh committed to writing by Masoretic scholars living in the Jewish community of Tiberias in ancient Galilee c.

Abbasid Caliphate

AbbasidAbbasidsAbbasid dynasty
750–950 CE under the Abbasid Caliphate.

Cantillation

cantillation markstropchanting
They wrote in the form of Tiberian vocalization, which employed diacritics added to the Hebrew letters: vowel signs and consonant diacritics (nequdot) and the so-called accents (two related systems of cantillation signs or te'amim).

David Kimhi

RadakDavid KimchiDavid Ḳimḥi
The prevailing view is that of David Qimchi's system of dividing the graphic signs into "short" and "long" vowels.

Sephardi Hebrew

SephardiSephardic HebrewSephardic
The values assigned to the Tiberian vowel signs reveals a Sephardi tradition of pronunciation (the dual quality of qames as, ; the pronunciation of simple sheva as ).