Tilde

~ŨĨSmall tildetildesa few other languageshome directoryintroduced as a diacritic
The tilde ( or ; ˜ or ~) is a grapheme with several uses.wikipedia
415 Related Articles

Manor of Molland

MollandMolland ChampsonMolland-Champson
The text of the Domesday Book of 1086, relating for example, to the manor of Molland in Devon (see image left), is highly abbreviated as indicated by numerous tildes.
The text of Exeter Domesday Book of 1086, relating to the manor later known as Molland-Bottreaux, under the heading "The King's Demesne belonging to the kingdom in Devenesscira" is as follows (abbreviations indicated by tildes expanded):

Diacritic

diacriticsdiacritical markdiacritical marks
The tilde has since been applied to a number of other uses as a diacritic mark or a character in its own right. In some languages, the tilde is used as a diacritical mark placed over a letter to indicate a change in pronunciation, such as nasalization.

Nasalization

nasalizednasalnasalisation
In some languages, the tilde is used as a diacritical mark placed over a letter to indicate a change in pronunciation, such as nasalization.
In the International Phonetic Alphabet, nasalization is indicated by printing a tilde diacritic above the symbol for the sound to be nasalized: is the nasalized equivalent of, and is the nasalized equivalent of.

Circumflex

circumflex accentô^
It was first used in the polytonic orthography of Ancient Greek, as a variant of the circumflex, representing a rise in pitch followed by a return to standard pitch.
The circumflex in the Latin script is chevron-shaped, while the Greek circumflex may be displayed either like a tilde or like an inverted breve ( ̑ ).

Scribal abbreviation

siglumsiglaabbreviations
The text of the Domesday Book of 1086, relating for example, to the manor of Molland in Devon (see image left), is highly abbreviated as indicated by numerous tildes. The reason for the name was that it was originally written over a letter as a scribal abbreviation, as a "mark of suspension", shown as a straight line when used with capitals.
Likewise the tilde, an undulated, curved-end line, came into standard late-medieval usage.

Diaeresis (diacritic)

diaeresisumlauttrema
On mechanical typewriters, Spanish keyboards (the first, or one of the first, non-English keyboards) had a dead key, which contained the acute accent, used over any vowel, and the dieresis, used only over u.
The grave accent and the diaeresis are the only diacritics native to Modern English (apart from diacritics used in loanwords, such as the acute accent, the cedilla, or the tilde).

Guarani language

GuaraníGuaraniGuaraní language
This usage has been adopted in the orthographies of several native languages of South America, such as Guarani and Nheengatu, as well as in the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA) and many other phonetic alphabets.
The tilde is used with many letters that are considered part of the alphabet.

Pitch-accent language

pitch accentpitchaccent
It was first used in the polytonic orthography of Ancient Greek, as a variant of the circumflex, representing a rise in pitch followed by a return to standard pitch.
In Latvian, long segments (the same criteria as in Lithuanian) can take on one of three pitches (intonācijas or more specifically zilbes intonācijas) either stiepta ("level"), lauzta ("broken") or krītoša ("falling") indicated by Latvian linguists with a tilde, circumflex or a grave accent respectively (in IPA, however, the tilde is replaced by a macron because the former is already reserved to denote nasalized vowels.) Some authors note that the level pitch is realized simply as "ultra long" (or overlong.) Endzelīns (1897) identifies "level diphthongs" as consisting of 3 moras not just two.

Greek diacritics

polytonicpolytonic orthographymonotonic orthography
It was first used in the polytonic orthography of Ancient Greek, as a variant of the circumflex, representing a rise in pitch followed by a return to standard pitch.
In distinction to the angled Latin circumflex, the Greek circumflex is printed in the form of either a tilde or an inverted breve.

Vietnamese language

VietnameseVietnamese nameVietnamese-language
In Vietnamese, a tilde over a vowel represents a creaky rising tone (ngã).

Spanish language

SpanishSpanish-languageCastilian
The name of the character came into English from Spanish and from Portuguese, which in turn came from the Latin titulus, meaning "title" or "superscription".
Spanish is written in the Latin script, with the addition of the character (eñe, representing the phoneme, a letter distinct from, although typographically composed of an with a tilde).

Syriac alphabet

SyriacEstrangelaSyriac script
A mark similar in appearance to a tilde, called majlīyānā, is placed above or below a letter in the Maḏnḥāyā variant of the alphabet to change its phonetic value (see also: Geresh):

ASCII

US-ASCIIAmerican Standard Code for Information InterchangeASCII code
The incorporation of the tilde into ASCII is a direct result of its appearance as a distinct character on mechanical typewriters in the late nineteenth century.

Tone (linguistics)

tonetonal languagetones
In Vietnamese, a tilde over a vowel represents a creaky rising tone (ngã).

Lithuanian language

LithuanianLithuanian-languageLith.
Acute, grave, and tilde diacritics are used to indicate pitch accents.

Portuguese language

PortuguesePortuguese-languageBrazilian Portuguese
The name of the character came into English from Spanish and from Portuguese, which in turn came from the Latin titulus, meaning "title" or "superscription".
Portuguese is written with 26 letters of the Latin script, making use of five diacritics to denote stress, vowel height, contraction, nasalization, and etymological assibilation (acute accent, circumflex, grave accent, tilde, and cedilla).

Creaky voice

creakylaryngealizedlaryngealization
In the International Phonetic Alphabet, creaky voice of a phone is represented by a diacritical tilde, for example.

Typewriter

typewriterselectric typewritertypewritten
The incorporation of the tilde into ASCII is a direct result of its appearance as a distinct character on mechanical typewriters in the late nineteenth century.
The tilde character, never seen in isolation in metal typesetting, became a separate character in ASCII as a direct result of its use on dead keys for Spanish and Portuguese (see Tilde#Role of mechanical typewriters).

Asymptotic analysis

asymptoticasymptoticallyasymptotics
It can be used to denote the asymptotic equality of two functions.
is the tilde.

Breton language

BretonOld BretonMiddle Breton
In Breton, the symbol after a vowel means that the letter serves only to give the vowel a nasalised pronunciation, without being itself pronounced, as it normally is.
The circumflex, grave accent, trema and tilde appear on some letters.