Tim Duncan

Duncan Tim Duncan
Timothy Theodore Duncan (born April 25, 1976) is an American professional basketball coach and former player who is an assistant coach for the San Antonio Spurs of the National Basketball Association (NBA) He spent his entire 19-year playing career with the Spurs.wikipedia
594 Related Articles

San Antonio Spurs

San AntonioSpursSAS
Timothy Theodore Duncan (born April 25, 1976) is an American professional basketball coach and former player who is an assistant coach for the San Antonio Spurs of the National Basketball Association (NBA) He spent his entire 19-year playing career with the Spurs.
The team's recent success has coincided with the tenure of current head coach Gregg Popovich and with the playing careers of the Spurs' icons David Robinson (1989–2003) and Tim Duncan (1997–2016).

1997 NBA draft

19971997 draftNBA Draft
After graduating from college, Duncan went on to win NBA Rookie of the Year after being selected by San Antonio with the first overall pick in the 1997 NBA draft.
Leading up to the draft, there was no doubt that Tim Duncan would be selected at No.

List of first overall NBA draft picks

first overall pickfirst overallfirst overall draft pick
After graduating from college, Duncan went on to win NBA Rookie of the Year after being selected by San Antonio with the first overall pick in the 1997 NBA draft.
Eleven first picks have won the NBA Most Valuable Player Award: Oscar Robertson, Kareem Abdul-Jabbar (record six-time winner), Bill Walton, Magic Johnson (three-time winner), Hakeem Olajuwon, David Robinson, Shaquille O'Neal, Allen Iverson, Tim Duncan (two-time winner), LeBron James (four-time winner), and Derrick Rose (youngest winner).

Wake Forest University

Wake ForestWake Forest CollegeWake Forest Demon Deacons
Wake Forest University basketball coach Dave Odom, in particular, grew interested in Duncan after the 16-year-old allegedly played NBA star Alonzo Mourning to a draw in a 5-on-5 pick-up game.
Notable people of Wake Forest University include author Maya Angelou, mathematician Phillip Griffiths, psychologist Linda Nielsen, Senators Richard Burr and Kay Hagan, athletes Chris Paul, Tim Duncan, Muggsy Bogues, Brian Piccolo and Arnold Palmer, and CEO Charlie Ergen.

NBA Most Valuable Player Award

NBA Most Valuable PlayerMVPMost Valuable Player
Widely regarded as the greatest power forward of all time as well as one of the greatest basketball players in NBA history, he is a five-time NBA champion, a two-time NBA MVP, a three-time NBA Finals MVP, a 15-time NBA All-Star, and the only player to be selected to both the All-NBA and All-Defensive Teams for 13 consecutive seasons.
Moses Malone, Larry Bird and Magic Johnson each won the award three times, while Bob Pettit, Karl Malone, Tim Duncan, Steve Nash and Stephen Curry have each won it twice.

Wake Forest Demon Deacons men's basketball

Wake ForestWake Forest Demon DeaconsWake Forest University
In college, Duncan played for the Wake Forest Demon Deacons, and in his senior year, he earned the John Wooden Award as well as Naismith College Player of the Year and USBWA College Player of the Year.
Banners hang in the rafters commemorating past players' retired numbers (including Chris Paul, Tim Duncan, and Randolph Childress) and the late Skip Prosser.

Randolph Childress

Duncan struggled with early transition problems and was even held scoreless in his first college game, but as the year progressed, he and teammate Randolph Childress led the Deacons to a 20–11 win-loss record.
Named tournament MVP, Childress along with sophomore Tim Duncan, carried the Demon Deacons to the title, Childress averaged 35.7 points and 7 assists per game.

Naismith College Player of the Year

Naismith AwardNaismithNaismith Trophy
In college, Duncan played for the Wake Forest Demon Deacons, and in his senior year, he earned the John Wooden Award as well as Naismith College Player of the Year and USBWA College Player of the Year. In the 1996–97 NCAA season, new 7'1" Demon Deacon and future NBA player Loren Woods eased the pressure on Duncan close to the basket. The 1996-97 team won their first 13 games, but then came a slump, and they failed to win a third ACC title. The NCAA tournament was just as frustrating, as Stanford University, led by future NBA point guard Brevin Knight, eliminated Wake Forest with a 72–66 win. Duncan finished with an individually impressive season, averaging 20.8 points, 14.7 rebounds and 3.2 assists per game while shooting .606 from the field and winning the Defensive Player of the Year for a third straight season. He earned first-team All-American honors for the second time and was a unanimous pick for both the Oscar Robertson Trophy and Naismith College Player of the Year.

Atlantic Coast Conference Men's Basketball Player of the Year

ACC Player of the YearACC Men's Basketball Player of the YearPlayer of the Year
His season averages of 19.1 points and 12.3 rebounds per game led to another ACC Defensive Player of the Year award and his first ACC Player of the Year award.
Hemric, Len Chappell, Larry Miller, John Roche, Len Bias, Danny Ferry, Tim Duncan and J. J. Redick have won the award twice.

NBA All-Defensive Team

NBA All-Defensive Second TeamNBA All-Defensive First TeamAll-Defensive Team
Widely regarded as the greatest power forward of all time as well as one of the greatest basketball players in NBA history, he is a five-time NBA champion, a two-time NBA MVP, a three-time NBA Finals MVP, a 15-time NBA All-Star, and the only player to be selected to both the All-NBA and All-Defensive Teams for 13 consecutive seasons.
Tim Duncan holds the record for the most total selections to the All-Defensive Team with 15.

NABC Defensive Player of the Year

Henry Iba Corinthian Awardco-National Defensive Player of the YearNABC
During that period, he was a two-time ACC Player of the Year and a three-time NABC Defensive Player of the Year.
Three players have been named the NABC Defensive Player of the Year on three occasions—Stacey Augmon of UNLV (1989–91), Tim Duncan of Wake Forest (1995–97), and Shane Battier of Duke (1999–2001).

Dave Odom

Wake Forest University basketball coach Dave Odom, in particular, grew interested in Duncan after the 16-year-old allegedly played NBA star Alonzo Mourning to a draw in a 5-on-5 pick-up game.
Much of the success during these two years is attributed to star center Tim Duncan, whom he recruited as a player in the U.S. Virgin Islands in 1994.

All-NBA Team

All-NBA Second TeamAll-NBA First TeamAll-NBA Third Team
Widely regarded as the greatest power forward of all time as well as one of the greatest basketball players in NBA history, he is a five-time NBA champion, a two-time NBA MVP, a three-time NBA Finals MVP, a 15-time NBA All-Star, and the only player to be selected to both the All-NBA and All-Defensive Teams for 13 consecutive seasons.
Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, Kobe Bryant, Tim Duncan and LeBron James hold the record for the most total selections with fifteen.

Twin Towers (San Antonio Spurs)

Twin TowersThe Twin Towers
In the first two games, the "Twin Towers" outscored their Knicks counterparts Chris Dudley/Larry Johnson with 41 points, 26 rebounds, and nine blocks versus five points, 12 rebounds, and zero blocks.
The Twin Towers is a name applied to the combination of Tim Duncan and David Robinson playing as the frontcourt of the San Antonio Spurs from 1997–2003.

1998 NBA All-Star Game

19981998 All-Star GameAll-Star Game
Duncan was voted to the 1998 NBA All-Star Game by coaches.
This game was the All-Star Game debut of Kobe Bryant, the youngest all-star in NBA history at 19 years of age, and rookie Tim Duncan.

1999 NBA playoffs

1999playoffsFirst Round
In the 1999 NBA Playoffs, the Spurs defeated the Minnesota Timberwolves 3–1, swept the Los Angeles Lakers and the Portland Trail Blazers 4–0, and defeated the Cinderella story New York Knicks 4–1 in the Finals.
Tim Duncan was named NBA Finals MVP.

Basketball moves

post upbounce passno-look pass
Duncan's style of play was simple yet effective, combining an array of low-post moves, mid-range bank shots, and tough defense.
NBA players known for using the bank shot often are Sam Jones, George Gervin, Tim Duncan, Dwyane Wade, Dirk Nowitzki, Scottie Pippen, and Kobe Bryant.

Loren Woods

In the 1996–97 NCAA season, new 7'1" Demon Deacon and future NBA player Loren Woods eased the pressure on Duncan close to the basket. The 1996-97 team won their first 13 games, but then came a slump, and they failed to win a third ACC title. The NCAA tournament was just as frustrating, as Stanford University, led by future NBA point guard Brevin Knight, eliminated Wake Forest with a 72–66 win. Duncan finished with an individually impressive season, averaging 20.8 points, 14.7 rebounds and 3.2 assists per game while shooting .606 from the field and winning the Defensive Player of the Year for a third straight season. He earned first-team All-American honors for the second time and was a unanimous pick for both the Oscar Robertson Trophy and Naismith College Player of the Year.
He started his college career at Wake Forest University, where he was supposed to take over the center position once Tim Duncan left.

NBA Finals Most Valuable Player Award

NBA Finals MVPFinals MVPNBA Finals Most Valuable Player
Widely regarded as the greatest power forward of all time as well as one of the greatest basketball players in NBA history, he is a five-time NBA champion, a two-time NBA MVP, a three-time NBA Finals MVP, a 15-time NBA All-Star, and the only player to be selected to both the All-NBA and All-Defensive Teams for 13 consecutive seasons.
Magic Johnson, Shaquille O'Neal, Tim Duncan and LeBron James won the award three times in their careers.

List of NCAA Division I men's basketball career rebounding leaders

all-time leading rebounder1,673 reboundsaccumulated 1,429 rebounds
Overall, Duncan led his team to a 97–31 win–loss record and finished his college career as the all-time leading rebounder in NCAA history in the post-1973 era (a mark later surpassed by Kenneth Faried).
For Louisville, they are Charlie Tyra and Wes Unseld; for Wake Forest they are Dickie Hemric and Tim Duncan; and for Morehead State, they are Steve Hamilton and Kenneth Faried.

Kevin Garnett

Garnett
In contrast to contemporary prep-to-pro players like Kevin Garnett, Jermaine O'Neal, Tracy McGrady, or Kobe Bryant, Duncan stayed in college for a full four years.
The Wolves were defeated in the first round again, this time losing 3–1 to the eventual champion San Antonio Spurs who were led by young superstar and eventual NBA Finals MVP Tim Duncan.

David Robinson

David Robinson (basketball)DavidDavid M. Robinson
The Spurs were coming off an injury-riddled 1996–97 season; their best player, David Robinson—himself a number one draft pick in 1987—was sidelined for most of the year, and they had finished with a 20–62 win–loss record.
Robinson led the Spurs to the greatest single season turnaround in NBA history at the time (a record the Spurs themselves broke in 1997–98, after drafting Tim Duncan, which was then broken by the Boston Celtics in the 2007–08 NBA season).

John R. Wooden Award

Wooden AwardWoodenJohn Wooden Award
In college, Duncan played for the Wake Forest Demon Deacons, and in his senior year, he earned the John Wooden Award as well as Naismith College Player of the Year and USBWA College Player of the Year.

Hurricane Hugo

HugoHurricanes HugoHugo 1989
Duncan started out as an aspiring swimmer and did not begin playing basketball until ninth grade when Hurricane Hugo destroyed the only available Olympic-sized pool in his homeland of Saint Croix, U.S. Virgin Islands.
National Basketball Association player Tim Duncan, born in Christiansted and a two-time NBA MVP, of the San Antonio Spurs attributed his basketball career to Hurricane Hugo's destruction.

2000 NBA playoffs

2000playoffsFirst Round
Consequently, the Spurs were eliminated in the first round of the 2000 NBA Playoffs, losing 3–1 to the Phoenix Suns.
The San Antonio Spurs were the champions going into the playoffs, but following a season-ending injury to fourth-year star Tim Duncan, were eliminated by the Phoenix Suns in the first round, marking the first time since 1987 that a title-winning team did not repeat.