Timer

timerstiming devicesoftware timerCountdown timersdigital timerselectromechanical timermechanical timerstimetimer screen
A timer is a specialized type of clock used for measuring specific time intervals.wikipedia
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Time switch

astronomical timertimertimes
Time switches, timing mechanisms which activate a switch, are sometimes also called "timers".
A time switch (also called a timer switch, or simply timer) is a timer that operates an electric switch controlled by the timing mechanism.

Clockwork

clockwork motorclockworksClockwork Doll
Mechanical timers use clockwork to measure time.
The adjectives wind-up and spring-powered refer to mainspring-powered clockwork devices, which include clocks and watches, kitchen timers, music boxes, and wind-up toys.

Mainspring

mainspring barrelsspringspring motor
Manual timers are typically set by turning a dial to the time interval desired; turning the dial stores energy in a mainspring to run the mechanism.
The adjectives wind-up and spring-powered refer to mechanisms powered by mainsprings, which also include kitchen timers, music boxes, wind-up toys and clockwork radios.

Egg timer

egg-timersMemo Park TimerMemopark timer
Some less accurate, cheaper mechanisms use a flat paddle called a fan fly that spins against air resistance; low-precision mechanical egg-timers are sometimes of this type.
Most recently digital timers have also been manufactured and a wide selection of software is available to perform this task on a computer or mobile phone.

Balance wheel

foliotbalancecompensation balance
They function similarly to a mechanical alarm clock; the energy in the mainspring causes a balance wheel to rotate back and forth.
Until the 1980s balance wheels were the timekeeping technology used in chronometers, bank vault time locks, time fuzes for munitions, alarm clocks, kitchen timers and stopwatches, but quartz technology has taken over these applications, and the main remaining use is in quality mechanical watches.

Multivibrator

bistable multivibratorastable multivibratorAstable
This is a non-electronic type of multivibrator.
A multivibrator is an electronic circuit used to implement a variety of simple two-state devices such as relaxation oscillators, timers and flip-flops.

Clock

timepiecemechanical clockanalog clock
A timer is a specialized type of clock used for measuring specific time intervals.
Such mechanisms are usually called timers.

Washing machine

washing machineswasherclothes washer
The most common application of this timer now is in washers, driers and dishwashers.
Since their introduction, automatic washing machines have relied on electromechanical timers to sequence the washing and extraction process.

Stopwatch

stop watchstopwatcheshand-timed
A timer which counts upwards from zero for measuring elapsed time is often called a stopwatch, while a device which counts down from a specified time interval is more usually called a timer.

Watch

wristwatchwatcheswristwatches
Individual timers are implemented as a simple single-chip computer system, similar to a watch and usually using the same, mass-produced, technology.
Most electronic quartz watches, on the other hand, include time-related features such as timers, chronographs and alarm functions.

Cam timer

drum sequencersequencerDrum sequencer (controller)
An electromechanical cam timer uses a small synchronous AC motor turning a cam against a comb of switch contacts.
The timer sequence switches the cam motor off, and the motor is started again by the signal from the thermostat when the required temperature is reached.

Alarm clock

clock radioalarmalarm clocks
They function similarly to a mechanical alarm clock; the energy in the mainspring causes a balance wheel to rotate back and forth.

Watchdog timer

watchdogComputer Operating Properlyheartbeat
One specialist use of hardware timers in computer systems is as watchdog timers, that are designed to perform a hardware reset of the system if the software fails.
A watchdog timer (sometimes called a computer operating properly or COP timer, or simply a watchdog) is an electronic timer that is used to detect and recover from computer malfunctions.

Quartz clock

quartz watchquartzquartz movement
Electronic timers are essentially quartz clocks with special electronics, and can achieve higher precision than mechanical timers.
By the 1980s, quartz technology had taken over applications such as kitchen timers, alarm clocks, bank vault time locks, and time fuzes on munitions, from earlier mechanical balance wheel movements, an upheaval known in watchmaking as the quartz crisis.

Drip irrigation

drip tapedripdrip irrigation system
Drip irrigation for garden available in drip kits are increasingly popular for the homeowner and consist of a timer, hose and emitter.

Countdown

T-Minuscountdown clocklaunch countdown

Time lock

time-lockedtime-locked vaultTimelock
The time lock is a timer designed to prevent the opening of the safe or vault until it reaches the preset time, even if the correct lock combination(s) are known.

Hourglass

hour glasshour-glasssand timer
A simple example of this type is an hourglass.

Drag (physics)

dragaerodynamic dragair resistance
Some less accurate, cheaper mechanisms use a flat paddle called a fan fly that spins against air resistance; low-precision mechanical egg-timers are sometimes of this type.

Bimetallic strip

bi-metallic stripbimetallicbi-metallic
Short-period bimetallic electromechanical timers use a thermal mechanism, with a metal finger made of strips of two metals with different rates of thermal expansion sandwiched together; steel and bronze are common.

Thermal expansion

coefficient of thermal expansionthermal expansion coefficientexpansion
Short-period bimetallic electromechanical timers use a thermal mechanism, with a metal finger made of strips of two metals with different rates of thermal expansion sandwiched together; steel and bronze are common.

Steel

steel industrysteelworkersteels
Short-period bimetallic electromechanical timers use a thermal mechanism, with a metal finger made of strips of two metals with different rates of thermal expansion sandwiched together; steel and bronze are common.

Bronze

bronzesbronzewaresilicon bronze
Short-period bimetallic electromechanical timers use a thermal mechanism, with a metal finger made of strips of two metals with different rates of thermal expansion sandwiched together; steel and bronze are common.

Electric current

currentelectrical currentcurrents
An electric current flowing through this finger causes heating of the metals, one side expands less than the other, and an electrical contact on the end of the finger moves away from or towards an electrical switch contact.

Automotive lighting

taillightturn signalturn signals
The most common use of this type is in the "flasher" units that flash turn signals in automobiles, and sometimes in Christmas lights.