Timothy D. Murphy

Timothy D. "Big Tim" MurphyTimothy "Big Tim" Murphy
Timothy D.wikipedia
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Maurice Enright

Maurice "Mossy" EnrightEnright gangMaurice "Moss" Enright
A longtime rival of Maurice "Mossy" Enright, Murphy was suspected in his February 1920 gangland slaying.
Enright remained in control of the city's labor unions into the early months of Prohibition until his death on February 2, 1920, when he was gunned down near his South Side home (most likely by rival Timothy "Big Tim" Murphy or Johnny Torrio and Al Capone.

Cornelius Shea

Cornelius "Con" Shea
On May 6, 1922, Murphy, Cornelius Shea, and six other labor leaders were arrested and charged with the murder of a Chicago police officer.
He joined Timothy D. "Big Tim" Murphy's Irish American gang, and was allegedly involved in a number of crimes.

Chicago

Chicago, IllinoisChicago, ILCity of Chicago
Timothy D. "Big Tim" Murphy (died June 26, 1928) was a Chicago mobster and labor racketeer who controlled several major railroad, laundry and dye workers' unions during the 1910s and early 1920s.

Gangster

mobstergangstersmafiosi
Timothy D. "Big Tim" Murphy (died June 26, 1928) was a Chicago mobster and labor racketeer who controlled several major railroad, laundry and dye workers' unions during the 1910s and early 1920s.

Trade union

uniontrade unionistlabor union
Timothy D. "Big Tim" Murphy (died June 26, 1928) was a Chicago mobster and labor racketeer who controlled several major railroad, laundry and dye workers' unions during the 1910s and early 1920s.

Racket (crime)

racketeeringracketeerracket
Timothy D. "Big Tim" Murphy (died June 26, 1928) was a Chicago mobster and labor racketeer who controlled several major railroad, laundry and dye workers' unions during the 1910s and early 1920s.

Bookmaker

bookmakingbookmakersbookie
Murphy rose to prominence at the beginning of the 20th century in the bookmaking racket with then-partner Mont Tennes.

Irish Americans

IrishIrish-AmericanIrish American
In the 1910s, he established an Irish American gang which became one of Chicago's most powerful early organized crime organizations.

Al Capone

CaponeAlphonse "Scarface" CaponeMae Capone
Murphy's gang was one of the few respected by Al Capone and the Italian American-led Chicago Outfit.

Italian Americans

Italian-AmericanItalianItalian American
Murphy's gang was one of the few respected by Al Capone and the Italian American-led Chicago Outfit.

Chicago Outfit

Chicago MafiaSouth Side GangChicago mob
Murphy's gang was one of the few respected by Al Capone and the Italian American-led Chicago Outfit. Others suggest he was killed by Murray "The Camel" Humphreys, a former hitman and later a lieutenant for the Chicago Outfit.

Pullman (car or coach)

PullmanPullman carPullman cars
In February 1921, Murphy was charged with involvement in organizing the theft of $400,000 from a Pullman mail train at Chicago's Union Station in August 1920.

Kenesaw Mountain Landis

Judge LandisCommissioner LandisLandis
Although he was released on a $30,000 bond, Murphy was eventually convicted and sentenced by Judge Kenesaw Mountain Landis to seven years imprisonment.

Nolle prosequi

droppeddismissal of chargesnolle prossed
On May 24, the state asked for nolle prosequi and the court agreed to withdraw the indictments.

Murray Humphreys

Murray "The Camel" HumphreysMurray "The Hump" HumphreysMurray The Hump
Others suggest he was killed by Murray "The Camel" Humphreys, a former hitman and later a lieutenant for the Chicago Outfit.

Contract killing

hitmancontract killerhitmen
Others suggest he was killed by Murray "The Camel" Humphreys, a former hitman and later a lieutenant for the Chicago Outfit.

Joseph Glimco

Joey GlimcoJoseph "Joey" Glimco
He was also known as "Little Tim Murphy," a reference to Timothy "Big Tim" Murphy, a Chicago mobster and labor racketeer (also well known for his close ties to the Teamsters) whom the Chicago Outfit feared and subsequently murdered in 1928.

Jerry Horan

Among his clients were mobster and labor leader Timothy "Big Tim" Murphy, mobster Fred Mader, and mobster and labor leader Cornelius Shea (who was international president of the International Brotherhood of Teamsters).

Fred Mader

He was an associate of Timothy D. "Big Tim" Murphy, a mobster and labor racketeer who controlled several major railroad, laundry and dye workers' unions during the 1910s and early 1920s.