Tina Brown

Christina Hambley Brown CBE (born 21 November 1953), is a journalist, magazine editor, columnist, talk-show host, and author of The Diana Chronicles, a biography of Diana, Princess of Wales.wikipedia
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The Diana Chronicles

Christina Hambley Brown CBE (born 21 November 1953), is a journalist, magazine editor, columnist, talk-show host, and author of The Diana Chronicles, a biography of Diana, Princess of Wales.
The Diana Chronicles is a 2007 British biographical book by Tina Brown that chronicles the life and death of Diana, Princess of Wales.

The Daily Beast

Daily BeastDaily Beast,The Cheat Sheet
She was founding editor-in-chief of The Daily Beast, serving from 2008 to 2013. On 12 November 2010, The Daily Beast and Newsweek announced that they would merge their operations in a joint venture to be owned equally by Sidney Harman and IAC/InterActiveCorp.
The Beasts founding editor was Tina Brown, a former editor of Vanity Fair and The New Yorker as well as the short-lived Talk magazine.

Vanity Fair (magazine)

Vanity FairVanity Fair magazineVanity Fair'' magazine
Born a British citizen, she now holds joint citizenship after she took United States citizenship in 2005, following her emigration in 1984 to edit Vanity Fair.
He was followed by editors Tina Brown (1984–1992) and Graydon Carter (1992-2017).

The New Yorker

New YorkerNew Yorker MagazineThe New Yorker Magazine
Having been editor-in-chief of Tatler magazine at the age of 25, she rose to prominence in the American media industry as the editor of Vanity Fair from 1984 to 1992 and of The New Yorker from 1992 to 1998.
Ross was succeeded as editor by William Shawn (1951–87), followed by Robert Gottlieb (1987–92) and Tina Brown (1992–98).

Brian Sewell

Sewell-Hohler SyndicateSewell, Brian
Tatler featured writers from Brown's eclectic circle including Julian Barnes, Dennis Potter, Auberon Waugh, Brian Sewell, Georgina Howell (whom Brown appointed deputy editor), and Nicholas Coleridge (later President of Conde Nast International).
Following the Blunt affair, Sewell was hired as art critic for Tina Brown's revitalised Tatler magazine.

Diana, Princess of Wales

Princess DianaLady Diana SpencerPrincess of Wales
Christina Hambley Brown CBE (born 21 November 1953), is a journalist, magazine editor, columnist, talk-show host, and author of The Diana Chronicles, a biography of Diana, Princess of Wales.
Authors Tina Brown, Sally Bedell Smith and Sarah Bradford support Diana's admission in the interview that she had suffered from depression, "rampant bulimia" and had engaged numerous times in the act of self mutilation; the show's transcript records Diana confirming many of her mental health problems, including that she had "hurt (her) arms and legs".

Harold Evans

Sir Harold EvansHarry EvansEvans, Harold
In 1973, the literary agent Pat Kavanagh introduced Brown's writings to Harold Evans, editor of The Sunday Times and in 1974 she was given freelance assignments in the UK by Ian Jack, the paper's features editor and in the US by its colour magazine edited by Godfrey Smith.
In 1973, Evans met Tina Brown, a journalist 25 years his junior.

Tatler

The TatlerTatler MagazineHong Kong Tatler
Having been editor-in-chief of Tatler magazine at the age of 25, she rose to prominence in the American media industry as the editor of Vanity Fair from 1984 to 1992 and of The New Yorker from 1992 to 1998.
Tina Brown (editor 1979–83), created a vibrant and youthful Tatler and is credited with putting the edge, the irony and the wit back into what was then an almost moribund social title.

Georgina Howell

Tatler featured writers from Brown's eclectic circle including Julian Barnes, Dennis Potter, Auberon Waugh, Brian Sewell, Georgina Howell (whom Brown appointed deputy editor), and Nicholas Coleridge (later President of Conde Nast International).
After Tina Brown became the editor of The Tatler (in 1979), Brown appointed Howell as her deputy.

St Anne's College, Oxford

St Anne's CollegeSt AnneSt. Anne's College
She studied at St Anne's College, and graduated with a BA in English Literature.

Nicholas Coleridge

Nicholas David Coleridge
Tatler featured writers from Brown's eclectic circle including Julian Barnes, Dennis Potter, Auberon Waugh, Brian Sewell, Georgina Howell (whom Brown appointed deputy editor), and Nicholas Coleridge (later President of Conde Nast International).
From 1979-1982 he was Associate Editor of the Tatler, working for then editor Tina Brown; from 1982–85 he was a columnist at the Evening Standard; 1986–1989 he was editor of Harpers & Queen magazine, a Hearst title, before joining Condé Nast.

George W. S. Trow

George W.S. TrowGeorge Swift TrowGeorge Trow
George Trow, who had been with the magazine for almost three decades, accused Brown of "kissing the ass of celebrity" in his resignation letter.
In 1994, when new editor Tina Brown invited Roseanne Barr to oversee a special issue on women, Trow quit the magazine in protest.

Gail Sheehy

Sheehy, GailPassagesPassages'' (book)
In addition, Brown signed up among others Marie Brenner, Gail Sheehy, Jesse Kornbluth, T.D. Allman, Lynn Herschberg, James Kaplan, Peter J. Boyer, John Richardson, James Atlas, Alex Shoumatoff and Ben Brantley.
Vanity Fair's editor, Tina Brown, invited Sheehy to write political profiles beginning in 1984.

Adam Gopnik

Gopnik, AdamAdamAdam Gopnick
But Brown had the support of some New Yorker stalwarts, including John Updike, Roger Angell, Brendan Gill, Lillian Ross, Calvin Tomkins, Janet Malcolm, Harold Brodkey and Philip Hamburger, as well as newer staffers like Adam Gopnik and Nancy Franklin.
He has written for four New Yorker editors: William Shawn, Robert Gottlieb, Tina Brown, and David Remnick.

Jamaica Kincaid

(To which Brown reportedly replied, "I am distraught at your defection but since you never actually write anything I should say I am notionally distraught.") The departing Jamaica Kincaid described Brown as "a bully" and "Stalin in high heels."
She resigned from The New Yorker in 1996 when then editor Tina Brown chose actress Roseanne Barr to guest-edit an issue as an original feminist voice.

Miramax

Miramax FilmsMiramax Home EntertainmentMiramax Television
In 1998, Brown resigned from The New Yorker following an invitation from Harvey and Bob Weinstein of Miramax Films (then owned by The Walt Disney Company) to be the chairman of a new multi-media company they intended to start with a new magazine, book company, and television show.
Through Miramax, Harvey founded Talk magazine with Tina Brown in 1998 (it shut down in 2002), albeit without the approval of then-Disney chief Michael Eisner, which upset Eisner.

David Remnick

Remnick, David
During her editorship she let 79 staffers go and engaged 50 new writers and editors, most of whom remain to this day, including David Remnick (whom she nominated as her successor), Malcolm Gladwell, Anthony Lane, Jane Mayer, Jeffrey Toobin, Hendrik Hertzberg, Simon Schama, Lawrence Wright, Connie Bruck, John Lahr, and editors Pamela McCarthy and Dorothy Wickenden.
In July 1998, he became editor, succeeding Tina Brown.

Alex Shoumatoff

In addition, Brown signed up among others Marie Brenner, Gail Sheehy, Jesse Kornbluth, T.D. Allman, Lynn Herschberg, James Kaplan, Peter J. Boyer, John Richardson, James Atlas, Alex Shoumatoff and Ben Brantley.
In 1986 Shoumatoff wrote his first piece for Vanity Fair, about the murder of Dian Fossey, which was made into the movie Gorillas in the Mist, and was considered to be one of the newly resurrected magazine's stars by then-editor Tina Brown.

Edward Sorel

Ed Sorel
She also approved controversial covers from a new crop of artists, including Edward Sorel's October 1992 cover of a punk rock passenger sprawled in the backseat of an elegant horse-drawn carriage, which may have been Brown's self-mocking riposte to fears that she would downgrade the magazine.
Sorel joined The New Yorker in late 1992 contributing a cover to the first issue edited by new editor Tina Brown.

Art Spiegelman

SpiegelmanAce HoleArt Spieglman
A year later a national controversy was provoked by her publication of Art Spiegelman's Valentine's Day cover of a Jewish man and a black woman in an embracing kiss, a comment on the mounting racial tensions between blacks and ultra-Orthodox Jews in the Crown Heights section of Brooklyn, New York.
Hired by Tina Brown as a contributing artist in 1992, Spiegelman worked for The New Yorker for ten years.

Talk (magazine)

TalkTalk MagazineTalk'' magazine
Tina Brown next created Talk magazine, a monthly glossy, and appointed Jonathan Burnham and Susan Mercandetti to manage Talk Books.
Talk Media was founded in July 1998 by Miramax Films, Tina Brown and Ron Galotti to publish books, the Talk magazine and to produce television programs.

Newsweek

Newsweek MagazineNewsweek InternationalNewsweek Japan
On 12 November 2010, The Daily Beast and Newsweek announced that they would merge their operations in a joint venture to be owned equally by Sidney Harman and IAC/InterActiveCorp.
Tina Brown, The Daily Beast editor-in-chief, became editor of both publications.

Hendrik Hertzberg

Hendrick Hertzberg
During her editorship she let 79 staffers go and engaged 50 new writers and editors, most of whom remain to this day, including David Remnick (whom she nominated as her successor), Malcolm Gladwell, Anthony Lane, Jane Mayer, Jeffrey Toobin, Hendrik Hertzberg, Simon Schama, Lawrence Wright, Connie Bruck, John Lahr, and editors Pamela McCarthy and Dorothy Wickenden.
In 1992, when Tina Brown became editor of The New Yorker, she recruited Hertzberg as her executive editor, and he helped her redesign and revitalize the magazine.

Diane von Fürstenberg

Diane von FurstenbergDVFDiane Von Firstenberg
Partnering with Diane von Furstenberg, Vital Voices and the UN Foundation in 2010, The Daily Beast brought some of the world's most inspiring female leaders together at the Hudson Theatre in New York City for the first annual Women in the World Summit.
Her clothes have been worn by many celebrities including Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge, Gwyneth Paltrow, Kate Beckinsale, Madonna, Tina Brown, Jessica Alba, Susan Sarandon and Jennifer Lopez.

Tunku Varadarajan

The Daily Beasts writers include Christopher Buckley, Peter Beinart, Les Gelb, Joshua DuBois, Mark McKinnon, Meghan McCain, John Avlon, Lucinda Franks, Bruce Riedel, Lloyd Grove, Tunku Varadarajan, and Reza Aslan.
When Newsweek merged with The Daily Beast in December 2010, Varadarajan was named editor of Newsweek International by editor-in-chief Tina Brown.