A report on Tissue (biology)

Microscopic view of a histologic specimen of human lung, consisting of various tissues: blood, connective tissue, vascular endothelium and respiratory epithelium, stained with hematoxylin and eosin.
Cross-section of a flax plant stem with several layers of different tissue types:
Cross section of collenchyma cells
Cross section of 2-year-old Tilia americana, highlighting xylem ray shape and orientation
Xavier Bichat (1771–1802)

Biological organizational level between cells and a complete organ.

- Tissue (biology)
Microscopic view of a histologic specimen of human lung, consisting of various tissues: blood, connective tissue, vascular endothelium and respiratory epithelium, stained with hematoxylin and eosin.

27 related topics with Alpha

Overall

Many of the internal organs of the human body

Organ (biology)

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Many of the internal organs of the human body
The liver and gallbladder of a sheep
Relationship of major animal lineages with indication of how long ago these animals shared a common ancestor. On the left, important organs are shown, which allows us to determine how long ago these may have evolved.
The flower is the angiosperm's reproductive organ. This Hibiscus flower is hermaphroditic, and it contains stamen and pistils.
Strobilus of Equisetum telmateia
Human viscera

In biology, an organ is a collection of tissues joined in a structural unit to serve a common function.

Types of epithelium

Epithelium

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Types of epithelium
Summary showing different epithelial cells/tissues and their characteristics.
Forms of secretion in glandular tissue
Different characteristics of glands of the body
Epithelial cell infected with ''Chlamydia pneumoniae
Squamous epithelium 100x
Human cheek cells (Nonkeratinized stratified squamous epithelium) 500x
Histology of female urethra showing transitional epithelium
Histology of sweat gland showing stratified cuboidal epithelium

Epithelium is one of the four basic types of animal tissue, along with connective tissue, muscle tissue and nervous tissue.

Histologic specimen being placed on the stage of an optical microscope.

Histology

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Histology,

Histology,

Histologic specimen being placed on the stage of an optical microscope.
Human lung tissue stained with hematoxylin and eosin as seen under a microscope.
Histologic section of a plant stem (Alliaria petiolata).
Histologic section of a fossilized invertebrate. Ordovician bryozoan.
Items used for submitting specimens: (Biopsy) wrap, (biopsy) sponge, (tissue processing) cassette and (biopsy) bag.
Histologic sample being embedded in paraffin wax (tissue is held at the bottom of a metal mold, and more molten paraffin is poured over it to fill it).
Histologic sample being cut on a microtome.
Masson's trichrome staining on rat trachea.
Green algae under a Transmission electron microscope
Santiago Ramón y Cajal in his laboratory.

also known as microscopic anatomy or microanatomy, is the branch of biology which studies the microscopic anatomy of biological tissues.

Xylem (blue) transports water and minerals from the roots upwards.

Xylem

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Xylem (blue) transports water and minerals from the roots upwards.
A diagram showing the setup of a pressure bomb
Photos showing xylem elements in the shoot of a fig tree (Ficus alba): crushed in hydrochloric acid, between slides and cover slips
A banded tube from the late Silurian/early Devonian. The bands are difficult to see on this specimen, as an opaque carbonaceous coating conceals much of the tube. Bands are just visible in places on the left half of the image – click on the image for a larger view. Scale bar: 20 μm
Patterns of xylem development: xylem in brown; arrows show direction of development from protoxylem to metaxylem.

Xylem is one of the two types of transport tissue in vascular plants, the other being phloem.

Skin

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Layer of usually soft, flexible outer tissue covering the body of a vertebrate animal, with three main functions: protection, regulation, and sensation.

Layer of usually soft, flexible outer tissue covering the body of a vertebrate animal, with three main functions: protection, regulation, and sensation.

Frog Gland Anatomy- A: Mucous gland (alveolus), B: Chromophore, C: Granular Gland (alveolus), D: Connective Tissue, E: Stratum Corneum, F: Transition Zone (intercalary region), G: Epidermis (Where the duct resides), H: Dermis
The distribution of the blood vessels in the skin of the sole of the foot. (Corium – TA alternate term for dermis – is labeled at upper right.)

In mammals, the skin is an organ of the integumentary system made up of multiple layers of ectodermal tissue and guards the underlying muscles, bones, ligaments, and internal organs.

A stained histologic specimen, sandwiched between a glass microscope slide.

Staining

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Technique used to enhance contrast in samples, generally at the microscopic level.

Technique used to enhance contrast in samples, generally at the microscopic level.

A stained histologic specimen, sandwiched between a glass microscope slide.
Example of negative staining
Microscopic view of a histologic specimen of human lung tissue stained with hematoxylin and eosin.
PAS diastase showing the fungus Histoplasma.
Gömöri methenamine silver stain demonstrating histoplasma (illustrated in black).
Carmine staining of a parasitic flatworm.
Main staining types when using hematoxylin and eosin (H&E).

Stains may be used to define biological tissues (highlighting, for example, muscle fibers or connective tissue), cell populations (classifying different blood cells), or organelles within individual cells.

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Anatomy

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Branch of biology concerned with the study of the structure of organisms and their parts.

Branch of biology concerned with the study of the structure of organisms and their parts.

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A dissected body, lying prone on a table, by Charles Landseer
Stylized cutaway diagram of an animal cell (with flagella)
Hyaline cartilage at high magnification (H&E stain)
Gastric mucosa at low magnification (H&E stain)
Cross section through skeletal muscle and a small nerve at high magnification (H&E stain)
Mouse skull
Cutaway diagram showing various organs of a fish
Skeleton of Surinam horned frog (Ceratophrys cornuta)
Plastic model of a frog
Skeleton of a diamondback rattlesnake
Part of a wing. Albrecht Dürer, c. 1500–1512
Modern anatomic technique showing sagittal sections of the head as seen by an MRI scan
In the human, the development of skilled hand movements and increased brain size is likely to have evolved simultaneously.
Head of a male Daphnia, a planktonic crustacean
Image of early rendition of anatomy findings
An anatomy thangka, part of Desi Sangye Gyatso's The Blue Beryl, 17th century
Surgical instruments were invented for the first time in history by Abulcasis in the 11th century
Anatomy of the eye for the first time in history by Hunayn ibn Ishaq in the 9th century
13th century anatomical illustration
Anatomical study of the arm, by Leonardo da Vinci, (about 1510)
Anatomical chart in Vesalius's Epitome, 1543
Michiel Jansz van Mierevelt – Anatomy lesson of Dr. Willem van der Meer, 1617
An electron microscope from 1973
Anatomical study of the arm, by Leonardo da Vinci, (about 1510)

Microscopic anatomy involves the use of optical instruments in the study of the tissues of various structures, known as histology, and also in the study of cells.

Simple diagram of the human circulatory system

Blood vessel

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The blood vessels are the components of the circulatory system that transport blood throughout the human body.

The blood vessels are the components of the circulatory system that transport blood throughout the human body.

Simple diagram of the human circulatory system
Transmission electron micrograph of a blood vessel displaying an erythrocyte (red blood cell, E) within its lumen, endothelial cells forming its tunica intima (inner layer), and pericytes forming its tunica adventitia (outer layer).
Diagram of blood vessel structures
Constricted blood vessel.

There are five types of blood vessels: the arteries, which carry the blood away from the heart; the arterioles; the capillaries, where the exchange of water and chemicals between the blood and the tissues occurs; the venules; and the veins, which carry blood from the capillaries back towards the heart.

Portrait of Bichat by Pierre-Maximilien Delafontaine, 1799

Xavier Bichat

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French anatomist and pathologist, known as the father of modern histology.

French anatomist and pathologist, known as the father of modern histology.

Portrait of Bichat by Pierre-Maximilien Delafontaine, 1799
Portrait of Pierre-Joseph Desault (left) and title page from Bichat's Surgical Works of Desault, 2nd ed (right)
Title page of Traité des membranes
The Hôtel-Dieu of Paris (drawn c. 1830)
The Death of Xavier Bichat (assisted by Pierre-Jean-Baptiste Esparron and Philibert Joseph Roux) by Louis Hersent (1817 Salon)
Bichat's grave in the Père Lachaise Cemetery
Title page of Recherches physiologiques sur la vie et la mort
Title page of Anatomie générale
Bichat's statue by David d'Angers at the historic École de Chirurgie in Paris
Relief of Bichat on the pediment of the Panthéon
Statue by D'Angers in Bourg-en-Bresse
Portrait by Choquet
Detail from Veloso Salgado's Medicine Through the Ages, NOVA University Lisbon
Bust at the University of Zaragoza College of Medicine

Although he worked without a microscope, Bichat distinguished 21 types of elementary tissues from which the organs of the human body are composed.

Chloroplasts in leaf cells of the moss Mnium stellare

Plant anatomy

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General term for the study of the internal structure of plants.

General term for the study of the internal structure of plants.

Chloroplasts in leaf cells of the moss Mnium stellare
This is a diagram of the anatomy of a plant with labels of structural parts of the plants and the roots. 1. Shoot system. 2. Root system. 3. Hypocotyl. 4. Terminal bud. 5. Leaf blade. 6. Internode. 7. Axillary bud. 8. Petiole. 9. Stem. 10. Node. 11. Tap root. 12. Root hairs. 13. Root tip. 14. Root cap
Vascular tissue of a gooseberry (left) and a vine branch (right) from Grew's Anatomy of Plants
Root tip
Nehemiah Grew, Father of Plant Anatomy

Plant anatomy is now frequently investigated at the cellular level, and often involves the sectioning of tissues and microscopy.