Tlingit language

Tlingitlanguagedialect of the Tlingit languageInland Tlingittheir own languagetliTlingit nameTlingit phonologyTlingit wordTlingit:
The Tlingit language (Lingít ) is spoken by the Tlingit people of Southeast Alaska and Western Canada and is a branch of the Na-Dene language family.wikipedia
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Tlingit

Tlingit peopleInland TlingitTlingits
The Tlingit language (Lingít ) is spoken by the Tlingit people of Southeast Alaska and Western Canada and is a branch of the Na-Dene language family.
Their language is the Tlingit language (natively Lingít, pronounced ), in which the name means "People of the Tides".

Alaska

CityAKAlaskan
Extensive effort is being put into revitalization programs in Southeast Alaska to revive and preserve the Tlingit language and culture.
Alaska (Alaasikaq; Alutiiq: Alas'kaaq; Tlingit: Anáaski; Аляска) is a U.S. state in the northwest extremity of the United States West Coast, just across the Bering Strait from Asia.

Na-Dene languages

Na-DenéNa-DeneNa-Dené languages
The Tlingit language (Lingít ) is spoken by the Tlingit people of Southeast Alaska and Western Canada and is a branch of the Na-Dene language family.
Na-Dene (also Nadene, Na-Dené, Athabaskan–Eyak–Tlingit, Tlina–Dene) is a family of Native American languages that includes at least the Athabaskan languages, Eyak, and Tlingit languages.

Eyak language

Eyakeya
The shared features between the Eyak language, found around the Copper River delta, and Tongass Tlingit, near the Portland Canal, are all the more striking for the distances that separate them, both geographic and linguistic. al.) showed a strong connection to Eyak and hence to the Athabaskan languages.
The Eyak–Athabaskan group forms a basic division of the Na-Dené language family, the other being Tlingit.

Athabaskan languages

AthabaskanAthabascanAthabaskan language
al.) showed a strong connection to Eyak and hence to the Athabaskan languages.
Tlingit is distantly related to the Athabaskan–Eyak group to form the Na-Dene family, also known as Athabaskan–Eyak–Tlingit (AET).

Petersburg, Alaska

PetersburgPetersburg BoroughPetersburg Pilot
Petersburg (Tlingit: Gantiyaakw Séedi "Steamboat Channel") is a census-designated place (CDP) in Petersburg Borough, Alaska, United States.

Wrangell, Alaska

WrangellFort WrangellFort Stikine
The City and Borough of Wrangell (Tlingit: Ḵaachx̱aana.áakʼw) is a borough in Alaska, United States.

Lituya Bay

Baie des FrançaisLituya
Lituya Bay (Tlingit: Ltu.aa, meaning 'lake within the point') is a fjord located on the coast of the Southeast part of the U.S. state of Alaska.

Nass River

NassNass ValleyNass Basin
Tlingit legend tells that groups of Tlingit once inhabited the Stikine, Nass, and Skeena river valleys during their migrations from the interior.
The name Nisga'a is a reduced form of, which is a loan from Tongass Tlingit, where it means "people of the Nass River".

Taku River

Taku
The exception is an area known as "Inland Tlingit" that extends up the Taku River and into northern British Columbia and the Yukon around Atlin Lake (Áa Tleen "Big Lake") and Teslin Lake (Desleen < Tas Tleen "Big Thread") lake districts, as well as a concentration around Bennett Lake at the end of the Chilkoot Trail (Jilkhoot).
One account of its name is that "Taku" is the Tlingit language word for "salmon" but the Taku Tlingit name for themselves T'aaku Kwáan translates as "Geese Flood Upriver Tribe"". There are also two kwaans of the Tlingit people inland in British Columbia, the Áa Tlein Kwáan ("Big Lake Tribe", today organized as the Taku River Tlingit First Nation) and the Deisleen Kwáan ("Big Sinew Tribe", today organized as the Teslin Tlingit Council); the territory of the former includes those areas of the Taku basin in British Columbia.

Haida people

HaidaKaigani HaidaHaida Nation
Prior to the 19th century, Haida would speak a number of coastal First Nations languages such as Tlingit, Nisg̱a'a and Coast Tsimshian.

Kake, Alaska

Kake
The name comes from the Tlingit word Ḵéix̱ʼ (Northern Tlingit) or Ḵéex̱ʼ (Southern Tlingit), which is derived from ḵée 'dawn, daylight' and x̱ʼé 'mouth', i.e. 'mouth of dawn' or 'opening of daylight'.

Haida language

HaidaNorthern Haida languagehai
Sapir initially proposed a connection between Tlingit and Haida, but the debate over Na-Dene gradually excluded Haida from the discussion.
Franz Boas first suggested that Haida might be genetically related to the Tlingit language in 1894, and linguist Edward Sapir included Haida in the Na-Dené language family in 1915.

Teslin Lake

Teslin
The exception is an area known as "Inland Tlingit" that extends up the Taku River and into northern British Columbia and the Yukon around Atlin Lake (Áa Tleen "Big Lake") and Teslin Lake (Desleen < Tas Tleen "Big Thread") lake districts, as well as a concentration around Bennett Lake at the end of the Chilkoot Trail (Jilkhoot).
According to the Yukon Geographical Names Project, "Teslin" means "long water", but in the Tlingit language the local kwaan or tribe of Tlingit is called Deisleen Kwáan", meaning "Big Sinew Tribe".

Prince of Wales Island (Alaska)

Prince of Wales IslandPrince of Wales Island, AlaskaPrince of Wales
Kaigani is a mispronunciation of the Tlingit word x'aax' aani, which translates to "crabapple country".

Yukon

Yukon TerritoryYKYT
The exception is an area known as "Inland Tlingit" that extends up the Taku River and into northern British Columbia and the Yukon around Atlin Lake (Áa Tleen "Big Lake") and Teslin Lake (Desleen < Tas Tleen "Big Thread") lake districts, as well as a concentration around Bennett Lake at the end of the Chilkoot Trail (Jilkhoot).
Similarly, the territorial government also recognizes that First Nations and Inuit languages plays a part in cultural heritage of the territory; these languages include Tlingit, and the less common Tahltan, as well as seven Athapaskan languages, Upper Tanana, Gwitchin, Hän, Northern Tutchone, Southern Tutchone, Kaska and Tagish, some of which are rare.

Annette Island

Annette Island, AlaskaAnnetteAnnette Island Reserve
The meaning of the Tlingit name for the island is Winter Town.

Bilabial consonant

BilabialLabialbilabial consonants
Approximately 0.7% of the world's languages lack bilabial consonants altogether, including Tlingit, Chipewyan, Oneida, and Wichita.

Lateral consonant

LateralLateral approximantLaterals
Tlingit's only missing ejective consonant in the Tlingit series is pronounced, and the language is also notable for having several laterals but no voiced and for having no labials in most dialects, except for and in recent English loanwords.
For example, Tlingit has but no.

Language revitalization

Language revivalrevitalizationrevival
In April 2014, Alaska HB 216 recognized Tlingit as an official language of Alaska, lending support to language revitalization.
Similar to other Indigenous languages, Tlingit is critically endangered.

Ejective consonant

ejectiveejectives ejective
It has an almost complete series of ejective consonants accompanying its stop, fricative, and affricate consonants.
Tlingit is an extreme case, with ejective alveolar, lateral, velar, and uvular fricatives, ; it may be the only language with the last type.

Nora Marks Dauenhauer

Dauenhauer, Nora M.Dauenhauer, Nora MarksNora
Nora Marks Keixwnéi Dauenhauer (May 8, 1927 – September 25, 2017) was a Tlingit poet, short-story writer, and Tlingit language scholar from Alaska.

Labial consonant

LabiallabialsBilabial
Tlingit's only missing ejective consonant in the Tlingit series is pronounced, and the language is also notable for having several laterals but no voiced and for having no labials in most dialects, except for and in recent English loanwords.
Examples are Tlingit, Eyak (both Na-Dené), Wichita (Caddoan), and the Iroquoian languages except Cherokee.

Uvular consonant

Uvularuvular consonantsuvulars
Nasal consonants assimilating with and the velar and uvular plosives is common among Tlingit-speakers of all dialects.
The Tlingit language of the Alaskan Panhandle has ten uvular consonants, all of which are voiceless obstruents:

Labialization

labializedlab.labial
The consonant ÿ has recently merged with y or w, depending on the phonological environment, with w next to rounded vowels and labialized consonants, and y elsewhere.