A woman smoking a cigarette, the most common method of tobacco smoking
Tobacco smoke in an Irish pub before a smoking ban came into effect on March 29, 2004
Aztec women are handed flowers and smoking tubes before eating at a banquet, Florentine Codex, 16th century.
Gentlemen Smoking and Playing Backgammon in an Interior by Dirck Hals, 1627
Bonsack's cigarette rolling machine, as shown on U.S. patent 238,640
A lengthy study conducted in order to establish the strong association necessary for legislative action (US cigarette consumption per person blue, male lung cancer rate brown)
Tendu Patta (Leaf) collection for Beedi industries
A graph that shows the efficiency of smoking as a way to absorb nicotine compared to other forms of intake.
Sigmund Freud, whose doctor assisted his suicide because of oral cancer caused by smoking
Common adverse effects of tobacco smoking. The more common effects are in bold face.
Skull with a burning cigarette, by Vincent van Gogh.
An enclosed smoking area in a Japanese train station. Notice the air vent on the roof.

Tobacco smoking is the practice of burning tobacco and ingesting the smoke that is produced.

- Tobacco smoking

Tobacco smoke is a sooty aerosol produced by the incomplete combustion of tobacco during the smoking of cigarettes and other tobacco products.

- Tobacco smoke
A woman smoking a cigarette, the most common method of tobacco smoking

5 related topics

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A filtered cigarette

Cigarette

Narrow cylinder containing burnable material, typically tobacco, that is rolled into thin paper for smoking.

Narrow cylinder containing burnable material, typically tobacco, that is rolled into thin paper for smoking.

A filtered cigarette
An electronic cigarette
A reproduction of a carving from the temple at Palenque, Mexico, depicting a Maya deity using a smoking tube
Francisco Goya's La Cometa, depicting a (foreground left) man smoking an early quasicigarette
A 1942 ad encourages women to smoke Camel brand cigarettes.
Diagram of a cigarette
Leones Africanos brand cigarettes from the mid-20th century, part of the permanent collection of the Museo del Objeto del Objeto
A discarded cigarette butt, lying on dirty snow
Various types of electronic cigarettes.
Artistas brand cigarette package of Mexico from the Museo del Objeto del Objeto collection
Tabak-Trafik in Vienna: Since January 1, 2007, all cigarette machines in Austria must attempt to verify a customer's age by requiring the insertion of a debit card or mobile phone verification.
Simple molecular representation of cellulose acetate with one of the acetate groups on the cellulose backbone shown by the red circle
Discarded Newport cigarettes packs found in Olneyville, Rhode Island - 2008
Chemical hydrolysis of cellulose acetate
The chemical structure change of cellulose into glucose
A cigarette disposal canister, encouraging the public to dispose of their cigarettes properly
A Woolworths supermarket cigarette counter in New South Wales, Australia: In January 2011, Australia prohibited the display of cigarettes in retail outlets countrywide.
Cigarette salespeople in Jakarta, Indonesia

An electronic cigarette is a handheld battery-powered vaporizer that simulates smoking by providing some of the behavioral aspects of smoking, including the hand-to-mouth action of smoking, but without combusting tobacco.

Instead of cigarette smoke, the user inhales an aerosol, commonly called vapor.

A chest X-ray showing a tumor in the lung (marked by arrow)

Lung cancer

Malignant lung tumor characterized by uncontrolled cell growth in tissues of the lung.

Malignant lung tumor characterized by uncontrolled cell growth in tissues of the lung.

A chest X-ray showing a tumor in the lung (marked by arrow)
Relationship between cigarette consumption per person (blue) and male lung cancer rates (dark yellow) in the US over the century
Risk of death from lung cancer is strongly correlated with smoking.
CT scan showing a cancerous tumor in the left lung
Primary pulmonary sarcoma in an asymptomatic 72-year-old male
Pie chart showing incidences of NSCLCs as compared to SCLCs shown at right, with fractions of smokers versus nonsmokers shown for each type
Cross section of a human lung: The white area in the upper lobe is cancer; the black areas are discoloration due to smoking.
Pneumonectomy specimen containing a squamous-cell carcinoma, seen as a white area near the bronchi
Brachytherapy (internal radiotherapy) for lung cancer given via the airway
Monoclonal antibodies used in the treatment of NSCLC and their mechanism of action https://doi.org/10.3390/ph13110373
The main treatment arms of phase 3 clinical trials providing immunotherapy in the first line for patients with NSCLC https://doi.org/10.3390/ph13110373
Overall survival in NSCLC patients treated with protocols incorporating immunotherapy in the first line for advanced or metastatic disease. Nasser NJ, Gorenberg M, Agbarya A. Pharmaceuticals 2020, 13(11), 373;
Lung cancer, incidence, mortality, and survival, England 1971–2011
Stage IA and IB lung cancer
Stage IIA lung cancer
Stage IIB lung cancer
One option for stage IIB lung cancer, with T2b; but if tumor is within 2 cm of the carina, this is stage 3
Stage IIIA lung cancer
Stage IIIA lung cancer, if there is one feature from the list on each side
Stage IIIA lung cancer
Stage IIIB lung cancer
Stage IIIB lung cancer
Stage IV lung cancer

The vast majority (85%) of cases of lung cancer are due to long-term tobacco smoking.

Cigarette smoke contains at least 73 known carcinogens, including benzo[a]pyrene, NNK, 1,3-butadiene, and a radioactive isotope of polonium – polonium-210.

Section of a lung showing centrilobular emphysema, with enlarged airspaces in the centre of a lobule usually caused by smoking and a major feature of COPD

Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

Type of progressive lung disease characterized by long-term respiratory symptoms and airflow limitation.

Type of progressive lung disease characterized by long-term respiratory symptoms and airflow limitation.

Section of a lung showing centrilobular emphysema, with enlarged airspaces in the centre of a lobule usually caused by smoking and a major feature of COPD
Signs and symptoms of stages of COPD.
Access to clean fuel and clean cooking facilities as of 2016.
Normal lungs shown in upper diagram. Lungs damaged by COPD in lower diagram with an inset showing a cross-section of bronchioles blocked by mucus, and damaged alveoli.
Micrograph showing emphysema (left – large empty spaces) and lung tissue with relative preserved alveoli (right).
A person blowing into a spirometer. Smaller handheld devices are available for office use.
Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease deaths per million persons in 2012
Giovanni Battista Morgagni, who made one of the earliest recorded descriptions of emphysema in 1769
alt=A black and white image, with a small white heart in the middle and large black lungs around it|Chest X-ray demonstrating severe COPD: Note the small heart size in comparison to the lungs.
A lateral chest X-ray of a person with emphysema: Note the barrel chest and flat diaphragm.
Lung bulla as seen on chest X-ray in a person with severe COPD
A severe case of bullous emphysema
Axial CT image of the lung of a person with end-stage bullous emphysema
Very severe emphysema with lung cancer on the left (CT scan)

The most common cause of COPD is tobacco smoking.

In non-smokers, exposure to passive smoking (second-hand smoke) is the cause of 1.2 million deaths from the more than 8 million deaths worldwide due to tobacco smoke.

Micrograph of a heart with fibrosis (yellow) and amyloidosis (brown). Movat's stain.

Cardiovascular disease

Class of diseases that involve the heart or blood vessels.

Class of diseases that involve the heart or blood vessels.

Micrograph of a heart with fibrosis (yellow) and amyloidosis (brown). Movat's stain.
Calcified heart of an older woman with cardiomegaly
Density-Dependent Colour Scanning Electron Micrograph SEM (DDC-SEM) of cardiovascular calcification, showing in orange calcium phosphate spherical particles (denser material) and, in green, the extracellular matrix (less dense material)
Cardiovascular diseases deaths per million persons in 2012

This may be caused by high blood pressure, smoking, diabetes mellitus, lack of exercise, obesity, high blood cholesterol, poor diet, excessive alcohol consumption, and poor sleep, among other things.

Associations also exist for exposure to arsenic, benzopyrenes, lead, dynamite, carbon disulphide, carbon monoxide, metalworking fluids and occupational exposure to tobacco smoke.

Smog in Cairo. Particulate air pollution, including smog, is a substantial cause of human exposure to PAHs.

Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon

Hydrocarbon—a chemical compound containing only carbon and hydrogen—that is composed of multiple aromatic rings.

Hydrocarbon—a chemical compound containing only carbon and hydrogen—that is composed of multiple aromatic rings.

Smog in Cairo. Particulate air pollution, including smog, is a substantial cause of human exposure to PAHs.
Crude oil on a beach after a 2007 oil spill in Korea.
An 18th-century drawing of chimney sweeps.
An adduct formed between a DNA strand and an epoxide derived from a benzo[a]pyrene molecule (center); such adducts may interfere with normal DNA replication.
Naphthalene
Biphenyl
Fluorene
Anthracene
Phenanthrene
Phenalene
Tetracene
Chrysene
Triphenylene
Pyrene
Pentacene
Perylene
Benzo[a]pyrene
Corannulene
Benzo[ghi]perylene
Coronene
Ovalene
Benzo[c]fluorene
Phenanthrene
Anthracene
Chrysene

Lower-temperature combustion, such as tobacco smoking or wood-burning, tends to generate low molecular weight PAHs, whereas high-temperature industrial processes typically generate PAHs with higher molecular weights.

In industrial countries, people who smoke tobacco products, or who are exposed to second-hand smoke, are among the most highly exposed groups; tobacco smoke contributes to 90% of indoor PAH levels in the homes of smokers.