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Mike Todd

Michael Todd
Todd-AO is also the name of the widescreen, 70 mm film format that was developed by Mike Todd and the American Optical Company in the mid-1950s.
He was the driving force behind the development of the eponymous Todd-AO widescreen film format.

Glen Glenn Sound

Glen GlennGlen Glenn Sound CompanyGlen Glenn Sound Department
As the production and exhibition markets became saturated with Todd-AO System hardware, the focus of the company gradually began to narrow down to the audio post-production side of the business, and Todd-AO became an independent sound mixing facility for commercial motion picture films and television after acquiring Glen Glenn Sound in 1986.
The company was acquired by audio post production company Todd-AO in 1986.

Sounddogs

Rob NokesRobert NokesSounddogs.com
On November 17, 2014, Sounddogs acquired the Todd-Soundelux Trademarks (Todd AO and Soundelux) and Copyrights (Sound Effects Library) through Federal Bankruptcy Court (Central District Case No.
Paul Huntsman of Todd-AO introduced them to Robert Grieve, who six years earlier had declined to become a founding partner of Soundelux.

70 mm film

70mm70 mm70mm film
Todd-AO is also the name of the widescreen, 70 mm film format that was developed by Mike Todd and the American Optical Company in the mid-1950s.
In collaboration with the American Optical company, Todd developed a system which was to be called "Todd-AO".

Super Panavision 70

Panavision System 65Super PanavisionPanavision 70
The use of 65 mm photography and 70 mm printing became the standard adopted by others: Super Panavision 70 (essentially the Panavision company's version of Todd-AO) and Ultra Panavision 70 (the same mechanically, but with a slight 1.25:1 anamorphic squeeze to accommodate extremely wide aspect ratio images) are both 65/70 processes.
The first camera system to be released using this format was Todd-AO, in 1955.

Around the World in 80 Days (1956 film)

Around the World in 80 DaysAround the World in Eighty Days1956 film adaptation
It is a common error to suppose that only 5 mm of space was devoted to the soundtracks, perhaps because writers do the math and find that 70 - 65 = 5, not allowing for a slightly reduced picture area to accommodate 2 tracks inside the sprocket holes, as well as 4 outside, and perhaps because the souvenir program for Around the World in Eighty Days made this very same error! Only the first two Todd-AO films, Oklahoma! and Around the World in Eighty Days, employed 30 frames per second photography.
The music score was composed by Victor Young, and the Todd-AO 70 mm cinematography (shot in Technicolor) was by Lionel Lindon.

Oklahoma! (1955 film)

Oklahoma!Oklahomafilm version
Only the first two Todd-AO films, Oklahoma! and Around the World in Eighty Days, employed 30 frames per second photography.
Oklahoma! was the first feature film photographed in the Todd-AO 70 mm widescreen process (and was simultaneously filmed in CinemaScope 35mm).

IMAX

IMAX 3DOMNIMAXIMAX Theater
The IMAX format also uses 65 mm camera and lab film to create 70 mm prints for projection (also known as the 65/70 mm process); conforming to the pitch and perforation standard for 70 mm Todd-AO film.
In the Todd-AO 70mm-format of widescreen cinema, the image area of a 65mm film-frame is 48.5 x; in the IMAX-format of widescreen cinema, the film-frame dimensions are 69.6 x. To match the standard image resolution of the moving image produced with the film-speed of 24 frames per second, an IMAX film requires three times the length of (negative) film stock required for a 65mm film of comparable scope and cinematic technique.

Patton (film)

PattonGeneral PattonHollywood picture about General Patton
Only two films were made in Dimension 150 – The Bible: In the Beginning..., directed by John Huston, and Patton, starring George C. Scott.
The film was shot in 65 mm Dimension 150 by cinematographer Fred J. Koenekamp and has a music score by Jerry Goldsmith.

Film perforations

perforationssprocket holesKodak Standard
The sprocket holes perforations on the two are the same, and the positives are printed using contact printing with the negatives centered on the larger 70 mm film.
For instance, 35mm Academy is also known as 4 perf-35mm; VistaVision is 8 perf-35mm; the long-time standard Todd-AO 70 mm film is 5 perf-70mm; and IMAX is 15 perf-70mm.

Philips DP70

Norelco Universal 70/35mm Motion Picture ProjectorsPhillips DP70Todd-AO projector
The original system generated an image that was "almost twice as intense as any ever seen onscreen before, and so hot that the film has to be cooled as it passes through the Todd-AO projector".
The DP70 (DP stands for "Double Projector") was invented and developed by a team headed by Jan-Jacob Kotte of Philips between 1952–54, as part of the Todd-AO system.

Aspect ratio (image)

4:3aspect ratio16:9
The aspect ratio of this format was 2.20:1.
Hollywood responded by creating a large number of wide-screen formats: CinemaScope (up to 2.:1), Todd-AO (2.20:1), and VistaVision (initially 1.50:1, now 1.:1 to 2.00:1) to name just a few.

Baraka (film)

BarakaBaraka'' (film)
It is also the most recent film to be photographed in the 70mm Todd-AO format, and the first film ever to be restored and scanned at 8K resolution.

Ampex

Ampex CorporationAmpex RecordsAmpex HS-100 model
Ampex Corporation engineers were in charge of developing the Todd-AO sound system.
The result of this development was the CinemaScope/Todd-AO motion picture sound system, which was first used in movies such as The Robe (1953) in 35mm and Oklahoma (1955) in 70mm (and also in 35mm).

The Bible: In the Beginning...

The Bible: In the BeginningThe BibleBible, The
Only two films were made in Dimension 150 – The Bible: In the Beginning..., directed by John Huston, and Patton, starring George C. Scott.
Released by 20th Century Fox, the film was photographed by Giuseppe Rotunno in Dimension 150 (color by DeLuxe Color), a variant of the 70mm Todd-AO format.

The Alamo (1960 film)

The Alamo19601960 version
The motion picture was photographed in 70 mm Todd-AO by William H. Clothier and released by United Artists.

The Agony and the Ecstasy (film)

The Agony and the Ecstasyfilm of the same nameThe Agony and the Ecstasy'' (film)
The film was shot in Todd-AO and Cinemascope versions.

Roadshow theatrical release

roadshowroad showroadshow release
Todd-AO films were closely associated with what was called roadshow exhibition.
Films shot in 3D sometimes were also shown in a roadshow format with intermission, regardless of actual length, as well as many films shot in various larger widescreen processes, such as CinemaScope, Todd-AO, MGM Camera 65, and Super Panavision 70 were given roadshow presentations, as well as films that were blown up to 70mm from the 35mm negative.

The Last Valley (film)

The Last ValleyThe Last Valley'' (film)The'' ''Last'' ''Valley
Based upon the novel The Last Valley (1959), by J. B. Pick, the cinematic version of The Last Valley, directed by James Clavell, was the final feature film photographed with the Todd-AO 70 mm widescreen process until it was revived to make the film Baraka in 1991.

Airport (1970 film)

Airportfilm adaptation1970
Ernest Laszlo photographed it in 70 mm Todd-AO.

Panavision

Panavision 3DPanaflexPanavision C, E, G series anamorphic
In the 1970s, under the leadership of Dr. Richard Vetter, Todd-AO made an attempt to compete with Panavision in the 35 mm motion picture camera rental market.
However, the film was released only in 35 mm anamorphic prints because the circuit of 70 mm theaters was booked with Around the World in Eighty Days (1956), shot with the competing, nonanamorphic Todd-AO system.

Ultra Panavision 70

MGM Camera 65Ultra PanavisionUltra Panavision and MGM Camera 65
The use of 65 mm photography and 70 mm printing became the standard adopted by others: Super Panavision 70 (essentially the Panavision company's version of Todd-AO) and Ultra Panavision 70 (the same mechanically, but with a slight 1.25:1 anamorphic squeeze to accommodate extremely wide aspect ratio images) are both 65/70 processes.
The Ultra Panavision 70 and MGM Camera 65 lenses and cameras were similar to the 1955 version of the Todd-AO 65 mm photographic process.

Can-Can (film)

Can-Can1960 filmCan Can
The film was photographed in Todd-AO.