Tomáš Garrigue Masaryk

MasarykTomáš MasarykT. G. MasarykTomáš G. MasarykAthenaeumPresident MasarykT.G. MasarykThomas G. MasarykThomas MasarykTomas Masaryk
Tomáš Garrigue Masaryk, sometimes anglicised to Thomas Masaryk (7 March 1850 – 14 September 1937), was a Czechoslovak politician, statesman, sociologist and philosopher.wikipedia
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Czechs

CzechBohemianCzech people
Tomáš Garrigue Masaryk, sometimes anglicised to Thomas Masaryk (7 March 1850 – 14 September 1937), was a Czechoslovak politician, statesman, sociologist and philosopher.
One of the most notable figures are founders of Czechoslovakia, modern state of independence of Czech and Slovak nations, Presidents Tomáš Garrigue Masaryk and Edvard Beneš, who was also leader of exile government in World War II.

Czechoslovakia

CzechoslovakCzechTCH
He founded Czechoslovakia and served as its first President, and so is called the "President Liberator"
The new state was founded by Tomáš Garrigue Masaryk (1850–1937), who served as its first president from 14 November 1918 to 14 December 1935.

Czech Republic

🇨🇿CzechCZE
Masaryk was born to a poor working-class family in the predominantly Catholic city of Hodonín, Moravia (in the region of Moravian Slovakia, today in the Czech Republic but then part of the Austro-Hungarian Empire.) Another tradition claims the nearby Slovak village of Kopčany, the home of his father, as his birthplace.
In the same year, the Czech Social Democratic and progressive politicians (including Tomáš Garrigue Masaryk) started the fight for universal suffrage.

Franz Brentano

BrentanoFranzBrentano’s
After grammar school in Brno and Vienna, from 1872 to 1876, Masaryk attended the University of Vienna, where he was a student of Franz Brentano.
Franz Clemens Honoratus Hermann Brentano (16 January 1838 – 17 March 1917) was an influential German philosopher, psychologist, and priest whose work strongly influenced not only students Edmund Husserl, Sigmund Freud, Tomáš Masaryk, Rudolf Steiner, Alexius Meinong, Carl Stumpf, Anton Marty, Kazimierz Twardowski, and Christian von Ehrenfels, but many others whose work would follow and make use of his original ideas and concepts.

Hodonín

GödingGodingHodonin, Czechoslovakia
Masaryk was born to a poor working-class family in the predominantly Catholic city of Hodonín, Moravia (in the region of Moravian Slovakia, today in the Czech Republic but then part of the Austro-Hungarian Empire.) Another tradition claims the nearby Slovak village of Kopčany, the home of his father, as his birthplace.
In 1850 Tomáš Garrigue Masaryk, the first president of independent Czechoslovakia, was born there.

List of Presidents of Czechoslovakia

PresidentPresident of CzechoslovakiaPresidents
He founded Czechoslovakia and served as its first President, and so is called the "President Liberator"

Edmund Husserl

HusserlHusserlianGerman
Between 1876 and 1879, he studied in Leipzig with Wilhelm Wundt and Edmund Husserl.
In Berlin he found a mentor in Thomas Masaryk, then a former philosophy student of Franz Brentano and later the first president of Czechoslovakia.

Moravia

MoravaMoravianMähren
Masaryk was born to a poor working-class family in the predominantly Catholic city of Hodonín, Moravia (in the region of Moravian Slovakia, today in the Czech Republic but then part of the Austro-Hungarian Empire.) Another tradition claims the nearby Slovak village of Kopčany, the home of his father, as his birthplace.
In 1927, the archeologist Gnirs, with the support of president Tomáš Garrigue Masaryk, began research on the site, located 80 km from Vindobona and 22 km to the south of Brno.

Charlotte Garrigue

On 15 March 1878, he married Charlotte Garrigue in Brooklyn, whom he had met at Leipzig.
Charlotte Garrigue Masaryk, (20 November 1850 in Brooklyn, New York, United States – 13 May 1923 Lány, Czechoslovakia) was the wife of the Czechoslovak philosopher, sociologist, and politician, Tomáš Garrigue Masaryk, the first President of Czechoslovakia.

Kopčany

Masaryk was born to a poor working-class family in the predominantly Catholic city of Hodonín, Moravia (in the region of Moravian Slovakia, today in the Czech Republic but then part of the Austro-Hungarian Empire.) Another tradition claims the nearby Slovak village of Kopčany, the home of his father, as his birthplace.
The father of Tomáš Garrigue Masaryk, the first President of Czechoslovakia, came from Kopčany.

Hilsner Affair

Leopold Hilsner
Further enraging Czech sentiment, he fought against the old superstition of Jewish blood libel during the Hilsner Trial of 1899.
The affair achieved widespread media publicity at the time, and Tomáš Garrigue Masaryk, then professor at Charles University in Prague also got involved in the case to defend Leopold Hilsner.

UCL School of Slavonic and East European Studies

School of Slavonic and East European StudiesSchool of Slavonic StudiesLondon School of Slavonic and East European Studies
In 1915, he was one of the first members of staff of the new School of Slavonic and East European Studies, now part of University College London, where the Student Society and Senior Common Room are named after him.
The School was inaugurated in London in 1915, as a department of King's College London, by Tomáš Garrigue Masaryk, who later became President of Czechoslovakia.

Czechoslovak Legion

Czech LegionCzechoslovaksCzechoslovak Army
In Russia, he was pivotal in establishing Czechoslovak Legions as an effective fighting force on the side of the Allies in World War I. During the war, he held a Serbian passport.
With the help of émigré intellectuals and politicians such as the Czech Tomáš Garrigue Masaryk and the Slovak Milan Rastislav Štefánik, they grew into a force of over 100,000 strong.

Charles Richard Crane

Baron" Crane
He also had strong personal links with the US since 1878 by his marriage with an American citizen and his friendship with Charles R. Crane.
In the 1900s, he brought Thomas Masaryk, Maksim Kovalevsky and Pavel Milyukov to lecture at the University of Chicago.

Mid-European Union

Speaking on 26 October 1918 from the steps of Independence Hall in Philadelphia, as head of the Mid-European Union, Masaryk called for the independence of the Czechoslovaks and the other oppressed peoples of Central Europe.
On 26 October 1918, Thomas Masaryk proclaimed the association's Declaration of Common Aims for the independence for the Czechoslovaks, Poles, Yugoslavs, Ukrainians, Uhro-Rusyns, Lithuanians, Romanians, Italian-Irredentists, Unredeemed Greeks, Albanians, Zionists, and Armenians.

Moravian Slovakia

Moravian SlovakSlováckoMoravian-Slovak
Masaryk was born to a poor working-class family in the predominantly Catholic city of Hodonín, Moravia (in the region of Moravian Slovakia, today in the Czech Republic but then part of the Austro-Hungarian Empire.) Another tradition claims the nearby Slovak village of Kopčany, the home of his father, as his birthplace.
Thomas G. Masaryk – philosopher, president of Czechoslovakia

Edvard Beneš

BenešPresident BenešBeneš, Edvard
He resigned from office on December 14, 1935 on the grounds of old age and poor health, and Edvard Beneš succeeded him.
In May 1918, Beneš, Tomáš Garrigue Masaryk and Milan Rastislav Štefánik were reported to be organizing a Czecho-Slovak army to fight for the Western Allies in France, recruited from among Czechs and Slovaks who were able to get to the front and also from the large emigrant populations in the United States, which was said to number more than 1,500,000.

Chicago

Chicago, IllinoisChicago, ILCity of Chicago
In 1918, he traveled to the United States (starting from Moscow 7 March to Vladivostok, Fusan and Tokyo and then to Vancouver by steamliner, and from Canada to Chicago), where he convinced President Woodrow Wilson of the righteousness of his cause.
More representational and portrait statuary includes a number of works by Lorado Taft (Fountain of Time, The Crusader, Eternal Silence, and the Heald Square Monument completed by Crunelle), French's Statue of the Republic, Edward Kemys's Lions, Saint-Gaudens's Abraham Lincoln: The Man (a.k.a. Standing Lincoln) and Abraham Lincoln: The Head of State (a.k.a. Seated Lincoln), Brioschi's Christopher Columbus, Meštrović's The Bowman and The Spearman, Dallin's Signal of Peace, Fairbanks's The Chicago Lincoln, Boyle's The Alarm, Polasek's memorial to Masaryk, memorials along Solidarity Promenade to Kościuszko, Havliček and Copernicus by Chodzinski, Strachovský, and Thorvaldsen, a memorial to General Logan by Saint-Gaudens, and Kearney's Moose (W-02-03).

1920 Czechoslovak presidential election

1920
Masaryk was re-elected as president three times: in May 1920, 1927, and 1934.
Tomáš Garrigue Masaryk has won his second term against German medician August Naegle.

1927 Czechoslovak presidential election

1927
Masaryk was re-elected as president three times: in May 1920, 1927, and 1934.
Tomáš Garrigue Masaryk was elected for his third term.

University of Vienna

ViennaVienna UniversityUniversity
After grammar school in Brno and Vienna, from 1872 to 1876, Masaryk attended the University of Vienna, where he was a student of Franz Brentano.
Some of the University's better-known students include: Kurt Adler, Franz Alt, Wilhelm Altar, Maria Anwander, Bruno Bettelheim, Rudolf Bing, Lucian Blaga, Hedda Bolgar, Josef Breuer, F. F. Bruce, Elias Canetti, Ivan Cankar, Otto Maria Carpeaux, Christian Doppler, Felix Ehrenhaft, Mihai Eminescu, Stephen Ferguson Paul Feyerabend, Heinz Fischer, O. W. Fischer, Ivan Franko, Sigmund Freud, Alcide De Gasperi, Kurt Gödel, Ernst Gombrich, Erich Göstl, Franz Grillparzer, Jörg Haider, Hans Hahn, Theodor Herzl, Hugo von Hofmannsthal, Edmund Husserl, Marie Jahoda, Elfriede Jelinek, Percy Lavon Julian, Percy Julian, Karl Kautsky, Elisabeth Kehrer, Leon Kellner, Hans Kelsen, Hryhoriy Khomyshyn, Rudolf Kirchschläger, Arthur Koestler, Jernej Kopitar, Karl Kordesch, Arnold Krammer, Karl Kraus, Bruno Kreisky, Richard Kuhn, Paul Lazarsfeld, Ignacy Łukasiewicz, Gustav Mahler, Tomáš Garrigue Masaryk, Lise Meitner, Gregor Mendel, Karl Menger, Franz Mesmer, Franc Miklošič, Alois Mock, Matija Murko, Joachim Oppenheim, Eduard Pernkopf, Anton Piëch, Pope Pius III, Maxim Podoprigora, Hans Popper, Karl Popper, Otto Preminger, Wilhelm Reich, Peter Safar, Mordkhe Schaechter, Karl Schenkl, Arthur Schnitzler, Albin Schram, Joseph Schumpeter, Wolfgang Schüssel, John J. Shea, Jr., Adalbert Stifter, Countess Stoeffel, Yemima Tchernovitz-Avidar, Eric Voegelin, Kurt Waldheim, Otto Weininger, Slavko Wolf, Eduard Zirm, Mordecai Sandberg, Calvin Edouard Ward, Stefan Zweig, and Huldrych Zwingli.

1934 Czechoslovak presidential election

1934
Masaryk was re-elected as president three times: in May 1920, 1927, and 1934.
Tomáš Garrigue Masaryk was elected for his fourth term.

1918 Czechoslovak presidential election

1918he was elected President of the Czechoslovak Republic
With the fall of the Austro-Hungarian Empire in 1918, the Allies recognized Masaryk as head of the Provisional Czechoslovak government (on October 14), and on November 14, 1918, he was elected President of the Czechoslovak Republic by the National Assembly in Prague while he was in New York.
Tomáš Garrigue Masaryk was elected the first Czechoslovak president.

Hrad (politics)

Hradpresident
He used his authority to create an extensive informal political network called Hrad (the Castle).
The first president of Czechoslovakia, Tomáš Masaryk, had very limited formal powers, such as representing the country abroad, declaring war, making peace and naming ambassadors.

Alice Masaryková

AliceAlica Masaryková
Charlotte gave birth to four other children, Herbert, Alice, Eleanor, and Olga.
She is a prominent figure within the field of applied sociology and known to many as the daughter of Tomáš Garrigue Masaryk and the First Lady of Czechoslovakia.