Tom Bradley (American politician)

Tom BradleyMayor Tom BradleyThomas BradleyBradleyMayor BradleyThomas J. Bradley
Thomas J. Bradley (December 29, 1917 – September 29, 1998) was an American politician and police officer who served as the 38th Mayor of Los Angeles from 1973 to 1993.wikipedia
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1982 California gubernatorial election

19821982 California governor's raceCalifornia
Bradley unsuccessfully ran for Governor of California in 1982 and 1986 and was defeated each time by the Republican George Deukmejian.
The Republican nominee, Attorney General George Deukmejian, narrowly defeated the Democratic nominee, Los Angeles Mayor Tom Bradley.

Bradley effect

apparently helpedsurprise landslideThe Bradley Effect
The racial dynamics that appeared to underlie his narrow and unexpected loss in 1982 gave rise to the political term "the Bradley effect."
It was named after Los Angeles Mayor Tom Bradley, an African-American who lost the 1982 California governor's race despite being ahead in voter polls going into the elections.

1986 California gubernatorial election

1986CaliforniaCalifornia 1986
Bradley unsuccessfully ran for Governor of California in 1982 and 1986 and was defeated each time by the Republican George Deukmejian.
Incumbent Republican George Deukmejian won easily in this rematch over the Democratic challenger, Los Angeles Mayor Tom Bradley.

Mayor of Los Angeles

MayorLos Angeles MayorMayor of Los Angeles, California
Thomas J. Bradley (December 29, 1917 – September 29, 1998) was an American politician and police officer who served as the 38th Mayor of Los Angeles from 1973 to 1993.
The longest term was that of Tom Bradley, who served for 20 years over five terms prior to the establishment of successive term limits.

John H. Francis Polytechnic High School

Polytechnic High SchoolLos Angeles Polytechnic High SchoolFrancis Polytechnic High School
Bradley attended Rosemont Elementary School, Lafayette Junior High School and Polytechnic High School, where he was the first black student to be elected president of the Boys League and the first to be inducted into the Ephebians national honor society.

George Deukmejian

Governor DeukmejianCourken George Deukmejian Jr.
Bradley unsuccessfully ran for Governor of California in 1982 and 1986 and was defeated each time by the Republican George Deukmejian.
Deukmejian narrowly defeated Los Angeles Mayor Tom Bradley in the general election.

Joe E. Hollingsworth

The City Council, which had the power to fill a vacancy, instead appointed Joe E. Hollingsworth.
He served for two years until he was ousted by retired policeman and future mayor Tom Bradley.

1973 Los Angeles mayoral election

1973 election
His 1973 election made him the second African-American mayor of a major U.S. city.
Incumbent Sam Yorty was defeated by Tom Bradley.

Calvert, Texas

CalvertCalvert, TX
Bradley, the grandson of a slave, was born on December 29, 1917, to Lee Thomas and Crenner Bradley, poor sharecroppers who lived in a small log cabin outside Calvert, Texas.

Spingarn Medal

Spingarn AwardNAACP Spingarn Medal
In 1985, he was awarded the Spingarn Medal from the NAACP.

Fletcher Bowron

Mayor Bowron
Bradley served for twenty years as mayor of Los Angeles, surpassing Fletcher Bowron with the longest tenure in that office.
He was the longest-serving mayor to date in the city, and was the city's second longest-serving mayor after Tom Bradley, presiding over the war boom and very heavy population growth, and building freeways to handle them.

Alphonzo E. Bell Jr.

Alphonzo E. Bell, Jr.Alphonzo BellAlphonzo Bell, Jr.
However, in the runoff, to the dismay of supporters such as Abigail Folger and Los Angeles area Congressman Alphonzo Bell, Yorty pulled an amazing come from behind victory to win reelection primarily because he played racial politics.
Late in his political career, during his run for the U.S. Senate in 1976, Bell was endorsed by both Los Angeles Mayor Tom Bradley, and by well-known actor/director John Wayne.

Leimert Park, Los Angeles

Leimert ParkHistoric Leimert Park VillageLeimert
He and his wife "needed a white intermediary to buy their first house in Leimert Park, then a virtually all-white section of the city's Crenshaw district."

Sam Yorty

Samuel YortySamuel W. YortySamuel William "Sam" Yorty
In 1969, Bradley first challenged incumbent Mayor Sam Yorty, a conservative Democrat (later Republican) though the election was nonpartisan.
In the 1969 mayoral primary, his popularity slipped well below that of Los Angeles City Council member Tom Bradley.

1992 Los Angeles riots

Los Angeles riotsLos Angeles riots of 1992Rodney King riots
Bradley retired in 1993, after his approval ratings began dropping subsequent to the 1992 Los Angeles Riots. The Rodney King videotaped incident in 1991 and 1992 Los Angeles riots — in which some critics said Bradley might have "actually made the already tense situation that much worse" — and the formation of the Christopher Commission also occurred on his watch as did the city-held federal trials in 1993 of the four LAPD officers charged in Rodney King's beating and federal convictions of two of them-Stacey Koon and Laurence Powell-that April 17.
At 4:58 p.m., Los Angeles Mayor Tom Bradley held a news conference to discuss the verdicts.

Christopher Commission

Independent Commission on the Los Angeles Police DepartmentChristopher Commission Report
The Rodney King videotaped incident in 1991 and 1992 Los Angeles riots — in which some critics said Bradley might have "actually made the already tense situation that much worse" — and the formation of the Christopher Commission also occurred on his watch as did the city-held federal trials in 1993 of the four LAPD officers charged in Rodney King's beating and federal convictions of two of them-Stacey Koon and Laurence Powell-that April 17.
The Independent Commission on the Los Angeles Police Department, informally known as the Christopher Commission, was formed by then-mayor of Los Angeles Tom Bradley in April 1991, in the wake of the Rodney King beating.

Los Angeles City Council District 10

10th DistrictDistrict 1010
Bradley applied for the 10th District seat in June 1961, when he was still a police lieutenant living at 3397 Welland Avenue; the post had been vacated by Charles Navarro when he was elected city controller.

Daryl Gates

Daryl F. GatesDarryl F. GatesDarryl Gates
During Bradley's tenure as mayor, Los Angeles saw the 1974 shootout with the Symbionese Liberation Army, Kiss' footprints outside Grauman's Chinese Theatre on February 20, 1976, Bradley's handprints there the following year on May 18, 1977, the Hillside Stranglers crime sprees from October, 1977-February, 1978, the end in 1978 of Edward M. Davis's career as one of the Los Angeles Police Department's controversially outspoken police chiefs and, after Assistant Chief Robert F. Rock's brief interim term, the rise of Daryl Gates as their longer-lasting-and also controversial-successor in 1978, Jimmy Carter's 1978 first and 1979 second presidential visits, Bradley's signing of the city's first homosexual rights bill in 1979, the city's bicentennial and Los Angeles as the first U.S. city where the discovery of symptoms of what would later be called AIDS was reported in, both in 1981, President Reagan's and Queen Elizabeth II's 1980's visits, ex. both of their debuts in the city were in 1983, the hosting of the 1984 Summer Olympic Games, Los Angeles surpassing Chicago as the second most populous city in the country (also 1984), Bradley's signing the city's-and maybe the U.S.'s-first anti-AIDS-discrimination bill in 1985, since Los Angeles was/is one of the original top 3 highest reporting cities for its cases along with New York and San Francisco, increased homelessness, crack cocaine and related gangs during the later 1980s and early 1990s, as well as road rage freeway shootings in the late 1980s when the term was first coined, and welcoming Pope John Paul II in 1987.
This was not unprecedented: during the run-up to the 1984 Olympic Games, Mayor Tom Bradley empowered Gates to take all of the city's gang members— known and suspected— into custody, where they remained until shortly after the Games' conclusion.

Rodney King

Rodney King beatingRodney King caseRodney King incident
The Rodney King videotaped incident in 1991 and 1992 Los Angeles riots — in which some critics said Bradley might have "actually made the already tense situation that much worse" — and the formation of the Christopher Commission also occurred on his watch as did the city-held federal trials in 1993 of the four LAPD officers charged in Rodney King's beating and federal convictions of two of them-Stacey Koon and Laurence Powell-that April 17.
Los Angeles Mayor Tom Bradley created the Independent Commission on the Los Angeles Police Department, also known as the Christopher Commission, in April 1991.

Membership discrimination in California clubs

Membership discrimination in California social clubsdiscriminationJews were not allowed at the country club
Los Angeles Mayor Tom Bradley on May 28, 1987, signed a bill sponsored by Council Member Joy Picus to ban discrimination at most of the city's large private clubs, based on "sex, sexual orientation, race, color, religion, ancestry, national origin or disability."

History of the African Americans in Los Angeles

History of African Americans in Los AngelesHistory of the African-Americans in Los Angelesblack history in Los Angeles
In 1973, Tom Bradley was elected as Mayor of Los Angeles, a role he'd hold for 20 years.

Inglewood Park Cemetery

Inglewood CemeteryInglewood MausoleumInglewood Park Cemetery, Inglewood, California
He was buried in Inglewood Park Cemetery.

Los Angeles Police Department

LAPDLos Angeles policeL.A.P.D.
The Rodney King videotaped incident in 1991 and 1992 Los Angeles riots — in which some critics said Bradley might have "actually made the already tense situation that much worse" — and the formation of the Christopher Commission also occurred on his watch as did the city-held federal trials in 1993 of the four LAPD officers charged in Rodney King's beating and federal convictions of two of them-Stacey Koon and Laurence Powell-that April 17. During Bradley's tenure as mayor, Los Angeles saw the 1974 shootout with the Symbionese Liberation Army, Kiss' footprints outside Grauman's Chinese Theatre on February 20, 1976, Bradley's handprints there the following year on May 18, 1977, the Hillside Stranglers crime sprees from October, 1977-February, 1978, the end in 1978 of Edward M. Davis's career as one of the Los Angeles Police Department's controversially outspoken police chiefs and, after Assistant Chief Robert F. Rock's brief interim term, the rise of Daryl Gates as their longer-lasting-and also controversial-successor in 1978, Jimmy Carter's 1978 first and 1979 second presidential visits, Bradley's signing of the city's first homosexual rights bill in 1979, the city's bicentennial and Los Angeles as the first U.S. city where the discovery of symptoms of what would later be called AIDS was reported in, both in 1981, President Reagan's and Queen Elizabeth II's 1980's visits, ex. both of their debuts in the city were in 1983, the hosting of the 1984 Summer Olympic Games, Los Angeles surpassing Chicago as the second most populous city in the country (also 1984), Bradley's signing the city's-and maybe the U.S.'s-first anti-AIDS-discrimination bill in 1985, since Los Angeles was/is one of the original top 3 highest reporting cities for its cases along with New York and San Francisco, increased homelessness, crack cocaine and related gangs during the later 1980s and early 1990s, as well as road rage freeway shootings in the late 1980s when the term was first coined, and welcoming Pope John Paul II in 1987. Bradley left his studies to join the Los Angeles Police Department in 1940.
Los Angeles' first black mayor Tom Bradley was an ex-police officer and quit the department after being unable to advance past the rank of lieutenant like other black police officers in the department.

Los Angeles

Los Angeles, CaliforniaLos Angeles, CALos Angeles, United States
In 1973, Thomas Bradley was elected as the city's first African American mayor, serving for five terms until retiring in 1993.

Richard Riordan

Richard J. RiordanDick Riordan
When Los Angeles Mayor Tom Bradley announced his retirement, Riordan's interest turned to the 1993 mayoral election.