Tomatillo

tomatillosPhysalis philadelphicaPhysalis ixocarpaPhysalis philadelphica'' var. ''immaculataTomate
The tomatillo (Physalis philadelphica and Physalis ixocarpa), also known as the Mexican husk tomato, is a plant of the nightshade family bearing small, spherical and green or green-purple fruit of the same name.wikipedia
120 Related Articles

Mexican cuisine

MexicanMexican foodMexico
A staple of Mexican cuisine, they are eaten raw or cooked in a variety of dishes, particularly salsa verde.
The staples are native foods, such as corn (maize), beans, squash, amaranth, chia, avocados, tomatoes, tomatillos, cacao, vanilla, agave, turkey, spirulina, sweet potato, cactus, and chili pepper.

Solanaceae

nightshadenightshade familysolanaceous
The tomatillo (Physalis philadelphica and Physalis ixocarpa), also known as the Mexican husk tomato, is a plant of the nightshade family bearing small, spherical and green or green-purple fruit of the same name.
The genus Physalis produces the so-called groundcherries, as well as the tomatillo (Physalis philadelphica), the Cape gooseberry and the Chinese lantern.

Tomato

tomatoesSolanum lycopersicumLycopersicon esculentum
Tomatillos were domesticated in Mexico before the coming of Europeans, and played an important part in the culture of the Maya and the Aztecs, more important than the tomato. In Spanish, it is called tomate de cáscara, tomate de fresadilla, tomate milpero, tomate verde (green tomato), tomatillo (Mexico; this term means "little tomato" elsewhere), miltomate (Mexico, Guatemala), farolito, or simply tomate (in which case the tomato is called jitomate from Nahuatl ).
The native Mexican tomatillo is tomate (in Nahuatl: tomātl, meaning "fat water" or "fat thing").

Salsa verde

green
A staple of Mexican cuisine, they are eaten raw or cooked in a variety of dishes, particularly salsa verde.
It is based on tomatillo and green chili peppers.

Green sauce

salsa verdeFrankfurt green sauceFrankfurter Grüne Soße
Tomatillos are a key ingredient in fresh and cooked Mexican and Central-American green sauces.
The Mexican salsa verde, though also called a "green sauce", is instead based on tomatillos; the New Mexico version uses a green chile base.

Physalis peruviana

Cape gooseberryuchuvaCape Gooseberries
Like their close relatives, Cape gooseberries, tomatillos have a high pectin content.
P. peruviana is closely related to the tomatillo and the Chinese lantern, also members of the genus Physalis.

Morelos

State of Morelos1st district of MorelosEstado Libre y Soberano de Morelos
The plant is grown mostly in the Mexican states of Hidalgo and Morelos, and in the highlands of Guatemala where it is known as miltomate.
These include bananas, cherimoyas, mameys, melons, cucumbers, tomatillos, jicama, squash, alfalfa, cotton, peanuts, onions and tomatoes.

Physalis

ground cherrygroundcherrybluebottles
The tomatillo is a member of the genus Physalis, erected by Carl Linnaeus in 1753.
Some species, such as the Cape gooseberry and tomatillo have been bred into many cultivars with varying flavors, from tart to sweet to savory.

Sepal

calyxsepalscalyces
The tomatillo fruit is surrounded by an inedible, paper-like husk formed from the calyx. As the fruit matures, it fills the husk and can split it open by harvest.
Examples include species of Acaena, some of the Solanaceae (for example the Tomatillo, Physalis philadelphica), and the water caltrop, Trapa natans.

Mexico

MexicanMéxicoMEX
Tomatillos originated in Mexico and were cultivated in the pre-Columbian era. Tomatillos are native to Central America and Mexico.

Pre-Columbian Mexico

Mexicopre-Columbianpre-Columbian Mexican
Tomatillos originated in Mexico and were cultivated in the pre-Columbian era.

Patagonia

PatagonianChilean PatagoniaArgentine Patagonia
In 2017, scientists reported on their discovery and analysis of a fossil tomatillo found in the Patagonian region of Argentina, dated to 52 million years BP.

Before Present

BPB.P.YBP
In 2017, scientists reported on their discovery and analysis of a fossil tomatillo found in the Patagonian region of Argentina, dated to 52 million years BP.

Maya civilization

MayaMayanMayans
Tomatillos were domesticated in Mexico before the coming of Europeans, and played an important part in the culture of the Maya and the Aztecs, more important than the tomato.

Aztecs

AztecAztec EmpireMexica
Tomatillos were domesticated in Mexico before the coming of Europeans, and played an important part in the culture of the Maya and the Aztecs, more important than the tomato.

Species

specificspecific epithetspecific name
The specific name philadelphica dates from the 18th century.

Nahuatl

Nahuatl languageNáhuatlNahua
The tomatillo (from Nahuatl, ') is also known as husk tomato, Mexican groundcherry, large-flowered tomatillo, or Mexican husk tomato'''.

Spanish language

SpanishSpanish-languageCastilian
In Spanish, it is called tomate de cáscara, tomate de fresadilla, tomate milpero, tomate verde (green tomato), tomatillo (Mexico; this term means "little tomato" elsewhere), miltomate (Mexico, Guatemala), farolito, or simply tomate (in which case the tomato is called jitomate from Nahuatl ).

Guatemala

GuatemalanRepublic of GuatemalaGTM
The plant is grown mostly in the Mexican states of Hidalgo and Morelos, and in the highlands of Guatemala where it is known as miltomate. In Spanish, it is called tomate de cáscara, tomate de fresadilla, tomate milpero, tomate verde (green tomato), tomatillo (Mexico; this term means "little tomato" elsewhere), miltomate (Mexico, Guatemala), farolito, or simply tomate (in which case the tomato is called jitomate from Nahuatl ).

Central America

CentralCentral AmericanCentral American Isthmus
Tomatillos are native to Central America and Mexico.

Hidalgo (state)

HidalgoState of HidalgoHidalgo state
The plant is grown mostly in the Mexican states of Hidalgo and Morelos, and in the highlands of Guatemala where it is known as miltomate.

The Bahamas

BahamasBahamianBahama Islands
Further distribution occurred in the Bahamas, Puerto Rico, Jamaica, and Florida.

Puerto Rico

Puerto RicanCommonwealth of Puerto RicoPuerto Rica
Further distribution occurred in the Bahamas, Puerto Rico, Jamaica, and Florida.

Jamaica

JAMJamaicanJamaica, West Indies
Further distribution occurred in the Bahamas, Puerto Rico, Jamaica, and Florida.