Tomato can (sports idiom)

tomato cancansstepping-stone
In boxing, kickboxing or mixed martial arts, "tomato can" or simply "tomato" or "can" is an idiom for a fighter with poor or diminished skills (at least when compared with the opponent they are placed against) who may be considered an easy opponent to defeat, or a "guaranteed win." Fights with "tomato cans" can be arranged to inflate the win total of a professional fighter.wikipedia
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Mike Tyson

Desiree WashingtonTysonMichael Tyson
In a fight on February 11, 1990, Mike Tyson lost his championship to James "Buster" Douglas in Tokyo.
The 89-second fight elicited criticism that Tyson's management lined up "tomato cans" to ensure easy victories for his return.

Journeyman (boxing)

journeymanjourneymenboxing journeyman
*Tomato can (sports idiom)

Boxing

boxerboxersprofessional boxer
In boxing, kickboxing or mixed martial arts, "tomato can" or simply "tomato" or "can" is an idiom for a fighter with poor or diminished skills (at least when compared with the opponent they are placed against) who may be considered an easy opponent to defeat, or a "guaranteed win."

Kickboxing

kickboxerkick boxingkick-boxing
In boxing, kickboxing or mixed martial arts, "tomato can" or simply "tomato" or "can" is an idiom for a fighter with poor or diminished skills (at least when compared with the opponent they are placed against) who may be considered an easy opponent to defeat, or a "guaranteed win."

Mixed martial arts

mixed martial artistMMAground and pound
In boxing, kickboxing or mixed martial arts, "tomato can" or simply "tomato" or "can" is an idiom for a fighter with poor or diminished skills (at least when compared with the opponent they are placed against) who may be considered an easy opponent to defeat, or a "guaranteed win."

Idiom

idiomsexpressionidiomatic expression
In boxing, kickboxing or mixed martial arts, "tomato can" or simply "tomato" or "can" is an idiom for a fighter with poor or diminished skills (at least when compared with the opponent they are placed against) who may be considered an easy opponent to defeat, or a "guaranteed win."

Chin (combat sports)

chinchinsiron chin
A "tomato can" is usually a fighter with a poor record, whose skills are substandard or who lacks toughness or has a "glass jaw."

Heavyweight

heavyweight boxerheavyweight boxingheavyweight division
Most fighters who are considered "tomato cans" are heavyweights, because at lower weight classes one must maintain a certain level of fitness in order to make weight, whereas a heavyweight who once fought at a trim 205 pounds could conceivably gain 150 pounds and still fight in the same division.

Job (professional wrestling)

jobberenhancement talentjobbers
"Tomato cans" are similar to jobbers in professional wrestling in that they serve to enhance the stature of someone the promotion uses to draw a crowd.

Professional wrestling

professional wrestlerprofessional wrestlerswrestling
"Tomato cans" are similar to jobbers in professional wrestling in that they serve to enhance the stature of someone the promotion uses to draw a crowd.

Journeyman (sports)

journeymanjourneymenjourneyman footballer
Journeyman boxers generally regarded as "tomato cans" have been known to provide surprising challenges to champions and in several instances, cause shocking upsets against supposedly superior opponents.

Upset (competition)

upsetgiant-killingupset victory
Journeyman boxers generally regarded as "tomato cans" have been known to provide surprising challenges to champions and in several instances, cause shocking upsets against supposedly superior opponents. The victory over Tyson, the previously undefeated "baddest man on the planet" and the most feared boxer in professional boxing at that time, at the hands of the 42–1 betting odds underdog Douglas, has been described as one of the most shocking upsets in modern sports history.

Muhammad Ali

Cassius ClayMuhammed AliAli
On March 24, 1975, Muhammad Ali faced Chuck Wepner, a lightly regarded but popular boxer from New Jersey.

Chuck Wepner

Wepner
On March 24, 1975, Muhammad Ali faced Chuck Wepner, a lightly regarded but popular boxer from New Jersey.

New Jersey

NJState of New JerseyJersey
On March 24, 1975, Muhammad Ali faced Chuck Wepner, a lightly regarded but popular boxer from New Jersey.

Don King (boxing promoter)

Don KingDon King BoxingDon King Productions
Don King selected Wepner as a "tomato can" to provide an easy victory for Ali after his famous win over George Foreman.

George Foreman

ForemanBig" George Foremanfight
Don King selected Wepner as a "tomato can" to provide an easy victory for Ali after his famous win over George Foreman.

Knockout

technical knockoutTKOKO
In a surprising turn of events, Wepner scored a disputed knockdown in the ninth round, and survived 19 seconds short of the distance, before losing by TKO in the 15th round.

Sylvester Stallone

StalloneBalboa ProductionsSylvester
Wepner's bout with Ali provided the inspiration for Sylvester Stallone's movie Rocky.

Rocky

1976 film of the same namefilm of the same namefirst
Wepner's bout with Ali provided the inspiration for Sylvester Stallone's movie Rocky.

Buster Douglas

James "Buster" DouglasJames DouglasDouglas
In a fight on February 11, 1990, Mike Tyson lost his championship to James "Buster" Douglas in Tokyo.

Odds

4/15/13/1
The victory over Tyson, the previously undefeated "baddest man on the planet" and the most feared boxer in professional boxing at that time, at the hands of the 42–1 betting odds underdog Douglas, has been described as one of the most shocking upsets in modern sports history.

Underdog

underdogsminnowgiant-killers
The victory over Tyson, the previously undefeated "baddest man on the planet" and the most feared boxer in professional boxing at that time, at the hands of the 42–1 betting odds underdog Douglas, has been described as one of the most shocking upsets in modern sports history.

Evander Holyfield

HolyfieldEvander "The Real Deal" Holyfield
Later, Douglas lost his first title defense against Evander Holyfield and was never able to successfully compete at such a high level again.