Tongdosa

Tongdo TempleTongdosa Temple
Tongdosa (, "Salvation of the World through Mastery of Truth") is a head temple of the Jogye Order of Korean Buddhism and in the southern part of Mt. Chiseosan near Yangsan, South Gyeongsang Province, South Korea.wikipedia
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Yangsan

Yangsan CityYangsan Castle
Tongdosa (, "Salvation of the World through Mastery of Truth") is a head temple of the Jogye Order of Korean Buddhism and in the southern part of Mt. Chiseosan near Yangsan, South Gyeongsang Province, South Korea.
Yangsan is home to several attractions, including Tongdosa Temple, Yangsan Tower, and Yangsan Stadium.

Three Jewels Temples

Three Jewel Temples of KoreaThree Jewel Temples
Tongdosa is one of the Three Jewels Temples and represents Gautama Buddha.
Tongdosa in South Gyeongsang Province represents the Buddha; Haeinsa, also in South Gyeongsang Province, represents the dharma or Buddhist teachings; and Songgwangsa in South Jeolla Province represents the sangha or Buddhist community.

Songgwangsa

Songgwang TempleSonggwangsa TempleSonggwang-sa
(Haeinsa, also in South Gyeongsang Province, represents the dharma or Buddhist teachings; and Songgwangsa in South Jeolla Province represents the sangha or Buddhist community.)
Though smaller in size, it is considered as the greatest among the trio of Three Jewels Temples representing “the Buddha, the dharma, and the sangha". The other two of the trio, Tongdosa and Haeinsa, are located in South Gyeongsang Province.

Jajang

Jajang-yulsa
Tongdosa was established by the monk Jajang after returning from Tang China in 646, during the reign of Queen Seondeok of Silla.
He is credited with founding the temple of Tongdosa in 646 CE, near in what is now Busan, South Korea, and played a significant role in the adoption of Buddhism as the national religion of Silla.

Jogye Order

JogyeJogye Order of Korean BuddhismChogye
Tongdosa (, "Salvation of the World through Mastery of Truth") is a head temple of the Jogye Order of Korean Buddhism and in the southern part of Mt. Chiseosan near Yangsan, South Gyeongsang Province, South Korea.

Queen Seondeok of Silla

Queen SeondeokSeondeokDeokman
Tongdosa was established by the monk Jajang after returning from Tang China in 646, during the reign of Queen Seondeok of Silla.
Bunhwangsa, Oseam, Sangwonsa, Yeongmyosa, Tongdosa, Woljeongsa, Baekdamsa, and Magoksa were also built during her reign.

Korean Buddhism

BuddhismKorean BuddhistBuddhist
Tongdosa (, "Salvation of the World through Mastery of Truth") is a head temple of the Jogye Order of Korean Buddhism and in the southern part of Mt. Chiseosan near Yangsan, South Gyeongsang Province, South Korea.

South Gyeongsang Province

Gyeongsangnam-doSouth GyeongsangGyeongnam
Tongdosa (, "Salvation of the World through Mastery of Truth") is a head temple of the Jogye Order of Korean Buddhism and in the southern part of Mt. Chiseosan near Yangsan, South Gyeongsang Province, South Korea.

South Korea

Republic of KoreaKoreaKOR
Tongdosa (, "Salvation of the World through Mastery of Truth") is a head temple of the Jogye Order of Korean Buddhism and in the southern part of Mt. Chiseosan near Yangsan, South Gyeongsang Province, South Korea.

Gautama Buddha

BuddhaSakyamuniShakyamuni
Tongdosa is one of the Three Jewels Temples and represents Gautama Buddha.

Haeinsa

Haeinsa TempleHae-in-saHaein Temple
(Haeinsa, also in South Gyeongsang Province, represents the dharma or Buddhist teachings; and Songgwangsa in South Jeolla Province represents the sangha or Buddhist community.)

Dharma

DhammaDharmicdharmas
(Haeinsa, also in South Gyeongsang Province, represents the dharma or Buddhist teachings; and Songgwangsa in South Jeolla Province represents the sangha or Buddhist community.) Only one building, the Mahavira Hall (main Dharma worship hall), survived the Japanese invasions of Korea (1592–98) in the late 16th century; the other buildings were rebuilt later that period.

South Jeolla Province

South JeollaJeollanam-doJeonnam
(Haeinsa, also in South Gyeongsang Province, represents the dharma or Buddhist teachings; and Songgwangsa in South Jeolla Province represents the sangha or Buddhist community.)

Sangha

SamghasanghasSaṅgha
(Haeinsa, also in South Gyeongsang Province, represents the dharma or Buddhist teachings; and Songgwangsa in South Jeolla Province represents the sangha or Buddhist community.)

Pagoda

pagodasBuddhist pagodasChedi
Courtyards at the temple are arrayed around several pagodas that house the Buddha's relics.

Tang dynasty

TangTang ChinaTang Empire
Tongdosa was established by the monk Jajang after returning from Tang China in 646, during the reign of Queen Seondeok of Silla.

Later Silla

Unified SillaSillaUnified Silla period
It thrived throughout the Later Silla and Goryeo periods, when Buddhism was the state religion, and remained strong even during Joseon.

Goryeo

Korea (Goryeo Kingdom)Goryeo DynastyKoryo
It thrived throughout the Later Silla and Goryeo periods, when Buddhism was the state religion, and remained strong even during Joseon.

State religion

Established Churchofficial religionestablished
It thrived throughout the Later Silla and Goryeo periods, when Buddhism was the state religion, and remained strong even during Joseon.

Joseon

Joseon DynastyJoseon (Korea)Korea
It thrived throughout the Later Silla and Goryeo periods, when Buddhism was the state religion, and remained strong even during Joseon.

Śarīra

sarirarelicsBuddhist relics
Tongdosa is reputed to house several relics of the Buddha himself, including a robe, a begging bowl, and a bone from his skull, all relics that Jajang brought back from the travels to Tang China he undertook in 636 to study with ten other monks.

Kasaya (clothing)

kasayakesakāṣāya
Tongdosa is reputed to house several relics of the Buddha himself, including a robe, a begging bowl, and a bone from his skull, all relics that Jajang brought back from the travels to Tang China he undertook in 636 to study with ten other monks.

Mahavira Hall

DaeungjeonMain HallDaeungjeon Hall
Only one building, the Mahavira Hall (main Dharma worship hall), survived the Japanese invasions of Korea (1592–98) in the late 16th century; the other buildings were rebuilt later that period.

Japanese invasions of Korea (1592–1598)

Imjin WarJapanese invasions of KoreaJapanese invasions of Korea (1592–98)
Only one building, the Mahavira Hall (main Dharma worship hall), survived the Japanese invasions of Korea (1592–98) in the late 16th century; the other buildings were rebuilt later that period.