Tongue

Glossusforamen cecumbladelingualbase of the tongueglossatipTuberculum lateraleapex of the tonguelateral lingual swelling
The tongue is a muscular organ in the mouth of most vertebrates that manipulates food for mastication, and is used in the act of swallowing.wikipedia
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Human digestive system

digestive systemdigestivedigestive tract
It has importance in the digestive system and is the primary organ of taste in the gustatory system.
The human digestive system consists of the gastrointestinal tract plus the accessory organs of digestion (the tongue, salivary glands, pancreas, liver, and gallbladder).

Taste

sourbittergustatory
It has importance in the digestive system and is the primary organ of taste in the gustatory system. The pharyngeal part is supplied by the glossopharyngeal nerve and the oral part is supplied by the lingual nerve (a branch of the mandibular branch (V3) of the trigeminal nerve) for somatosensory perception and by the chorda tympani (a branch of the facial nerve) for taste perception.
Taste is the sensation produced or stimulated when a substance in the mouth reacts chemically with taste receptor cells located on taste buds in the oral cavity, mostly on the tongue.

Chewing

masticationchewmasticate
The tongue is a muscular organ in the mouth of most vertebrates that manipulates food for mastication, and is used in the act of swallowing.
During the mastication process, the food is positioned by the cheek and tongue between the teeth for grinding.

Swallowing

swalloweddeglutitionswallow
The tongue is a muscular organ in the mouth of most vertebrates that manipulates food for mastication, and is used in the act of swallowing.
Swallowing is a complex mechanism using both skeletal muscle (tongue) and smooth muscles of the pharynx and esophagus.

Laminal consonant

laminallamino-alveolarlaminodental
Sounds made with the tongue tip are said to be apical, while those made with the tongue blade are said to be laminal.
A laminal consonant is a phone produced by obstructing the air passage with the blade of the tongue, the flat top front surface just behind the tip of the tongue on the top.

Lingual septum

median fibrous septum
The left and right sides are also separated along most of its length by a vertical section of fibrous tissue (the lingual septum) that results in a groove, the median sulcus on the tongue's surface.
The lingual septum consists of a vertical layer of fibrous tissue, extending throughout the entire length of the median plane of the tongue, though not quite reaching the dorsum.

Epiglottis

epiglottic cartilageepiglotticpalate
The posterior part is, at its root, directed backward, and connected with the hyoid bone by the hyoglossi and genioglossi muscles and the hyoglossal membrane, with the epiglottis by three glossoepiglottic folds of mucous membrane, with the soft palate by the glossopalatine arches, and with the pharynx by the superior pharyngeal constrictor muscle and the mucous membrane.
It projects upwards and backwards behind the tongue and the hyoid bone.

Facial nerve

facialcranial nerve VIIVII
The pharyngeal part is supplied by the glossopharyngeal nerve and the oral part is supplied by the lingual nerve (a branch of the mandibular branch (V3) of the trigeminal nerve) for somatosensory perception and by the chorda tympani (a branch of the facial nerve) for taste perception.
It emerges from the pons of the brainstem, controls the muscles of facial expression, and functions in the conveyance of taste sensations from the anterior two-thirds of the tongue.

Chorda tympani

chorda tympani nervechorda tympani'' nerve
The pharyngeal part is supplied by the glossopharyngeal nerve and the oral part is supplied by the lingual nerve (a branch of the mandibular branch (V3) of the trigeminal nerve) for somatosensory perception and by the chorda tympani (a branch of the facial nerve) for taste perception.
The chorda tympani is a branch of the facial nerve that originates from the taste buds in the front of the tongue, runs through the middle ear, and carries taste messages to the brain.

Genioglossus

genioglossus muscleGenioglossi
The posterior part is, at its root, directed backward, and connected with the hyoid bone by the hyoglossi and genioglossi muscles and the hyoglossal membrane, with the epiglottis by three glossoepiglottic folds of mucous membrane, with the soft palate by the glossopalatine arches, and with the pharynx by the superior pharyngeal constrictor muscle and the mucous membrane.
The genioglossus is one of the paired extrinsic muscles of the tongue.

Frenulum of tongue

frenulum linguaelingual frenulumfrenulum
On the undersurface of the tongue is a fold of mucous membrane called the frenulum that tethers the tongue at the midline to the floor of the mouth.
The frenulum of tongue or tongue web (also lingual frenulum or frenulum linguæ; also fraenulum ) is a small fold of mucous membrane extending from the floor of the mouth to the midline of the underside of the tongue.

Lingual nerve

linguallingual nervesnerve
The pharyngeal part is supplied by the glossopharyngeal nerve and the oral part is supplied by the lingual nerve (a branch of the mandibular branch (V3) of the trigeminal nerve) for somatosensory perception and by the chorda tympani (a branch of the facial nerve) for taste perception.
The lingual nerve is a branch of the mandibular division of the trigeminal nerve (CN V 3 ), which supplies general sensory innervation (not the gustative one) to the anterior 2/3 of the tongue.

Palatoglossal arch

glossopalatine archpalatoglossalArcus palatoglossus
The posterior part is, at its root, directed backward, and connected with the hyoid bone by the hyoglossi and genioglossi muscles and the hyoglossal membrane, with the epiglottis by three glossoepiglottic folds of mucous membrane, with the soft palate by the glossopalatine arches, and with the pharynx by the superior pharyngeal constrictor muscle and the mucous membrane.
The palatoglossal arch (glossopalatine arch, anterior pillar of fauces) on either side runs downward, lateral (to the side), and forward to the side of the base of the tongue, and is formed by the projection of the glossopalatine muscle with its covering mucous membrane.

Thyroglossal duct

Ductus thyreoglossus
The foramen cecum is also the point of attachment of the thyroglossal duct and is formed during the descent of the thyroid diverticulum in embryonic development.
It is located exactly mid-line, between the anterior 2/3 and posterior 1/3 of the tongue.

Hyoglossus

hyoglossus musclehyoglossi
The posterior part is, at its root, directed backward, and connected with the hyoid bone by the hyoglossi and genioglossi muscles and the hyoglossal membrane, with the epiglottis by three glossoepiglottic folds of mucous membrane, with the soft palate by the glossopalatine arches, and with the pharynx by the superior pharyngeal constrictor muscle and the mucous membrane.
The hyoglossus, thin and quadrilateral, arises from the side of the body and from the whole length of the greater cornu of the hyoid bone, and passes almost vertically upward to enter the side of the tongue, between the styloglossus and the inferior longitudinal muscle of the tongue.

Hyoglossal membrane

The posterior part is, at its root, directed backward, and connected with the hyoid bone by the hyoglossi and genioglossi muscles and the hyoglossal membrane, with the epiglottis by three glossoepiglottic folds of mucous membrane, with the soft palate by the glossopalatine arches, and with the pharynx by the superior pharyngeal constrictor muscle and the mucous membrane.
The hyoglossal membrane is a strong fibrous lamina, which connects the under surface of the root of the tongue to the body of the hyoid bone.

Muscle

musclesmuscularmusculature
The tongue is a muscular organ in the mouth of most vertebrates that manipulates food for mastication, and is used in the act of swallowing.

Tongue rolling

These muscles alter the shape of the tongue by lengthening and shortening it, curling and uncurling its apex and edges as in tongue rolling, and flattening and rounding its surface.
Tongue rolling is the ability to roll the lateral edges of the tongue upwards into a tube.

Glossopharyngeal nerve

glossopharyngealIXCN IX
The pharyngeal part is supplied by the glossopharyngeal nerve and the oral part is supplied by the lingual nerve (a branch of the mandibular branch (V3) of the trigeminal nerve) for somatosensory perception and by the chorda tympani (a branch of the facial nerve) for taste perception.
From there, it passes under cover of the hyoglossus muscle and is finally distributed to the palatine tonsil, the mucous membrane of the fauces and base of the tongue, and the serous glands of the mouth.

Inferior longitudinal muscle of tongue

inferior longitudinal musclelongitudinalis inferiorinferior longitudinal
They are the superior longitudinal muscle, the inferior longitudinal muscle, the vertical muscle, and the transverse muscle.
The inferior longitudinal muscle of tongue is a narrow band situated on the under surface of the tongue between the genioglossus and hyoglossus.

Lingual veins

lingual veinlingualranine
The lingual veins, drain into the internal jugular vein.
The lingual veins begin on the dorsum, sides, and under surface of the tongue, and, passing backward along the course of the lingual artery, end in the internal jugular vein.

Temporal styloid process

styloid processstyloid process (temporal)Styloid process of temporal bone
The styloglossus arises from the styloid process of the temporal bone and draws the sides of the tongue up to create a trough for swallowing.

Hypoglossal nerve

hypoglossalXIILingual branches of hypoglossal nerve
An area in the neck sometimes called the Pirogov triangle is formed by the intermediate tendon of the digastric muscle, the posterior border of the mylohyoid muscle, and the hypoglossal nerve.
The hypoglossal nerve is the twelfth cranial nerve, and innervates all the extrinsic and intrinsic muscles of the tongue, except for the palatoglossus which is innervated by the vagus nerve.

Superior longitudinal muscle of tongue

superior longitudinal musclesuperior longitudinal
They are the superior longitudinal muscle, the inferior longitudinal muscle, the vertical muscle, and the transverse muscle.
The Longitudinalis linguæ superior (Superior lingualis) is a thin stratum of oblique and longitudinal fibers immediately underlying the mucous membrane on the dorsum of the tongue.

Lingual artery

sublingual arterydeep lingual arterydorsal lingual branches of lingual artery
The tongue receives its blood supply primarily from the lingual artery, a branch of the external carotid artery.
It can be located easily in the tongue.