Tony Hoare

C. A. R. HoareC.A.R. HoareHoareCharles Antony Richard HoareSir Tony HoareSir Antony HoareCAR HoareAntony HoareC. Anthony R. HoareC.A.R. (Tony) Hoare
Sir Charles Antony Richard Hoare (born 11 January 1934) is a British computer scientist.wikipedia
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Quicksort

quick sortAverage time quicksortbalanced quicksort
He developed the sorting algorithm quicksort in 1959/1960. Hoare's most significant work has been in the following areas: his sorting and selection algorithm (Quicksort and Quickselect), Hoare logic, the formal language Communicating Sequential Processes (CSP) used to specify the interactions between concurrent processes, structuring computer operating systems using the monitor concept, and the axiomatic specification of programming languages.
Developed by British computer scientist Tony Hoare in 1959 and published in 1961, it is still a commonly used algorithm for sorting.

Hoare logic

Hoare tripleFloyd–Hoare logicHoare style
He also developed Hoare logic for verifying program correctness, and the formal language communicating sequential processes (CSP) to specify the interactions of concurrent processes (including the dining philosophers problem) and the inspiration for the occam programming language. Hoare's most significant work has been in the following areas: his sorting and selection algorithm (Quicksort and Quickselect), Hoare logic, the formal language Communicating Sequential Processes (CSP) used to specify the interactions between concurrent processes, structuring computer operating systems using the monitor concept, and the axiomatic specification of programming languages.
It was proposed in 1969 by the British computer scientist and logician Tony Hoare, and subsequently refined by Hoare and other researchers.

Dining philosophers problem

Dining PhilosophersDijkstra's solutionThe Dining Philosophers Problem
He also developed Hoare logic for verifying program correctness, and the formal language communicating sequential processes (CSP) to specify the interactions of concurrent processes (including the dining philosophers problem) and the inspiration for the occam programming language.
Soon after, Tony Hoare gave the problem its present formulation.

Occam (programming language)

occamoccam programming languageoccam 2
He also developed Hoare logic for verifying program correctness, and the formal language communicating sequential processes (CSP) to specify the interactions of concurrent processes (including the dining philosophers problem) and the inspiration for the occam programming language.
It was developed by David May and others at Inmos (trademark INMOS), advised by Tony Hoare, as the native programming language for their transputer microprocessors, but implementations for other platforms are available.

Elliott Brothers (computer company)

Elliott BrothersElliott AutomationElliott
In 1960, Hoare left the Soviet Union and began working at Elliott Brothers Ltd, a small computer manufacturing firm located in London, where he implemented ALGOL 60 and began developing major algorithms.
The computer scientist Sir Tony Hoare was an employee there from August 1960 to 1968.

ALGOL

ALGOL 60ALGOL programming languageALGOrithmic Language
In 1960, Hoare left the Soviet Union and began working at Elliott Brothers Ltd, a small computer manufacturing firm located in London, where he implemented ALGOL 60 and began developing major algorithms.
Tony Hoare remarked: "Here is a language so far ahead of its time that it was not only an improvement on its predecessors but also on nearly all its successors."

Programming Research Group

He became the Professor of Computing Science at the Queen's University of Belfast in 1968, and in 1977 returned to Oxford as the Professor of Computing to lead the Programming Research Group in the Oxford University Computing Laboratory (now Department of Computer Science, University of Oxford), following the death of Christopher Strachey.
The PRG was founded by Christopher Strachey in 1965 and after his death, C.A.R. Hoare, FRS took over the leadership in 1977.

Communicating sequential processes

CSPCommunicating Sequential Processes (CSP)channel
He also developed Hoare logic for verifying program correctness, and the formal language communicating sequential processes (CSP) to specify the interactions of concurrent processes (including the dining philosophers problem) and the inspiration for the occam programming language. Hoare's most significant work has been in the following areas: his sorting and selection algorithm (Quicksort and Quickselect), Hoare logic, the formal language Communicating Sequential Processes (CSP) used to specify the interactions between concurrent processes, structuring computer operating systems using the monitor concept, and the axiomatic specification of programming languages.
CSP was first described in a 1978 paper by Tony Hoare, but has since evolved substantially.

Monitor (synchronization)

monitorscondition variablemonitor
Hoare's most significant work has been in the following areas: his sorting and selection algorithm (Quicksort and Quickselect), Hoare logic, the formal language Communicating Sequential Processes (CSP) used to specify the interactions between concurrent processes, structuring computer operating systems using the monitor concept, and the axiomatic specification of programming languages.
Monitors were invented by Per Brinch Hansen and C. A. R. Hoare, and were first implemented in Brinch Hansen's Concurrent Pascal language.

University of Oxford

Oxford UniversityOxfordUniversity
He returned to the University of Oxford in 1958 to study for a postgraduate certificate in Statistics, and it was here that he began computer programming, having been taught Autocode on the Ferranti Mercury by Leslie Fox.
Stephen Wolfram, chief designer of Mathematica and Wolfram Alpha studied at the university, along with Tim Berners-Lee, inventor of the World Wide Web, Edgar F. Codd, inventor of the relational model of data, and Tony Hoare, programming languages pioneer and inventor of Quicksort.

Quickselect

quick select
Hoare's most significant work has been in the following areas: his sorting and selection algorithm (Quicksort and Quickselect), Hoare logic, the formal language Communicating Sequential Processes (CSP) used to specify the interactions between concurrent processes, structuring computer operating systems using the monitor concept, and the axiomatic specification of programming languages.
Like quicksort, it was developed by Tony Hoare, and thus is also known as Hoare's selection algorithm.

Merton College, Oxford

Merton CollegeMertonSt Alban Hall
He then studied Classics and Philosophy ("Greats") at Merton College, Oxford.
Other Mertonians in science include Canadian neurosurgeon Wilder Penfield, mathematician Sir Andrew Wiles who proved Fermat's Last Theorem, computer scientist Tony Hoare, chemist Sir George Radda, economist Catherine Tucker, geneticist Alec Jeffreys and cryptographer Artur Ekert.

Department of Computer Science, University of Oxford

Oxford University Computing LaboratoryOxford University Department of Computer ScienceDepartment of Computer Science
He became the Professor of Computing Science at the Queen's University of Belfast in 1968, and in 1977 returned to Oxford as the Professor of Computing to lead the Programming Research Group in the Oxford University Computing Laboratory (now Department of Computer Science, University of Oxford), following the death of Christopher Strachey.

Distinguished Fellow of the British Computer Society

DFBCSDistinguished FellowDistinguished Fellow at the British Computer Society (DFBCS)

Cliff Jones (computer scientist)

Cliff JonesCliff B. JonesC.B. Jones
He undertook a late DPhil at the Oxford University Computing Laboratory (now the Oxford University Department of Computer Science) under Tony Hoare, awarded in 1981.

Turing Award

ACM Turing AwardA.M. Turing AwardA. M. Turing Award

Queen's University Belfast

Queen's University, BelfastQueen's University of BelfastQueens University Belfast
He became the Professor of Computing Science at the Queen's University of Belfast in 1968, and in 1977 returned to Oxford as the Professor of Computing to lead the Programming Research Group in the Oxford University Computing Laboratory (now Department of Computer Science, University of Oxford), following the death of Christopher Strachey.
Notable academics who have worked at Queen's include Paul Bew, Baron Bew, Sir Bernard Crossland, Tony Hoare, Michael Mann, poet and critic Philip Hobsbaum, John H. Whyte and poet Philip Larkin was a sub-librarian at the university in the early 1950s.

Null pointer

nullnil
Speaking at a software conference called QCon London in 2009, he apologised for inventing the null reference:
In 2009 Tony Hoare (C.A.R.

Structured programming

structuredProgram structurestructured program
These issues were addressed during the late 1960s and early 1970s, with major contributions by Dijkstra, Robert W. Floyd, Tony Hoare, Ole-Johan Dahl, and David Gries.

Bill Roscoe

A. W. RoscoeRoscoe, A.W.
Professor Roscoe works in the area of concurrency theory, in particular the semantic underpinning of Communicating Sequential Processes (CSP) and the associated occam programming language with Sir Tony Hoare.

Augusto Sampaio

He undertook his PhD studies under the supervision of Prof. Sir Tony Hoare at the Oxford University Computing Laboratory (finishing in 1993).

Computer Pioneer Award

IEEE Computer Pioneer AwardIEEE Computer Society Computer Pioneer AwardIEEE Computer Society Pioneer Award

Computer science

computer scientistcomputer sciencescomputer scientists
Sir Charles Antony Richard Hoare (born 11 January 1934) is a British computer scientist.