Topographic prominence

prominenceprominenttopographically prominentrelative heighttopographical prominencekey colclean prominenceprominence colmost topographically prominentprominences
In topography, prominence measures the height of a mountain or hill's summit relative to the lowest contour line encircling it but containing no higher summit within it.wikipedia
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List of Marilyns in the British Isles

MarilynMarilynsList of Marilyns in England
John and Anne Nuttall's The Mountains of England and Wales uses a cutoff of 15 m (about 50 ft), and Alan Dawson's list of Marilyns uses 150 m (about 500 ft).
Marilyns are defined as peaks with a prominence above 150 m, regardless of height or any other merit (e.g. topographic isolation, as used in Munros).

List of highest mountains on Earth

List of highest mountainshighest mountainHighest Mountains of the World
Many lists of mountains take topographic prominence as a criterion for inclusion, or cutoff.
A popular and intuitive way to distinguish mountains from subsidiary peaks is by their height above the highest saddle connecting it to a higher summit, a measure called topographic prominence or re-ascent (the higher summit is called the "parent peak").

List of mountain peaks by prominence

List of peaks by prominenceRanked 100thRanked 10th
This generates lists of peaks ranked by prominence, which are qualitatively different from lists ranked by elevation.
This is a list of mountain peaks ordered by their topographic prominence.

Mont Blanc

Mont-BlancMonte BiancoMount Blanc
For example, the encirclement parent of Mont Blanc, the highest peak in the Alps, is Mount Everest.
It rises 4808 m above sea level and is ranked 11th in the world in topographic prominence.

Fourteener

fourteenersList of United States fourteeners14,000-foot peaks
In the contiguous United States, the famous list of "fourteeners" (14,000 foot / 4268 m peaks) uses a cutoff of 300 ft / 91 m (with some exceptions).
Objective standards for independence include topographic prominence and isolation (distance from a higher summit), or a combination of the two.

K2

Abruzzi SpurAbruzzi RidgeK-2
For example, the world's second-highest mountain is K2 (height 8,611 m, prominence 4,017 m).
K2 is ranked 22nd by topographic prominence, a measure of a mountain's independent stature, because it is part of the same extended area of uplift (including the Karakoram, the Tibetan Plateau, and the Himalaya) as Mount Everest, in that it is possible to follow a path from K2 to Everest that goes no lower than 4594 m, at the Kora La on the Nepal/China border in the Mustang Lo.

Col

saddlenotcha saddle
A peak's key col (highest gap between two mountains) is a unique point on this contour line and the parent peak is some higher mountain, selected according to various criteria.
The height of a summit above its highest col (called the key col) is effectively a measure of a mountain's topographic prominence.

Denali

Mount McKinleyMt. McKinleyMount Denali
The key col of Denali in Alaska (6,194 m) is a 56 m col near Lake Nicaragua (unless one accepts the Panama Canal as a key col; this is a matter of contention).
With a topographic prominence of 20156 ft and a topographic isolation of 4629 mi, Denali is the third most prominent and third most isolated peak on Earth, after Mount Everest and Aconcagua.

Alps

AlpineItalian Alpsthe Alps
For example, the encirclement parent of Mont Blanc, the highest peak in the Alps, is Mount Everest.
The Union Internationale des Associations d'Alpinisme (UIAA) has defined a list of 82 "official" Alpine summits that reach at least 4000 m. The list includes not only mountains, but also subpeaks with little prominence that are considered important mountaineering objectives.

Winter Hill (North West England)

Winter HillWinterhill
Billinge Hill → Winter Hill → Hail Storm Hill → Boulsworth Hill → Kinder Scout → Cross Fell → Helvellyn → Scafell Pike → Snowdon → Ben Nevis.
Winter Hill's topographic prominence results in it being classified as a Marilyn.

Pico de Orizaba

CitlaltépetlPico de Orizaba National ParkCitlaltepec
Its encirclement parent is Pico de Orizaba (5,636 m), the highest mountain in Mexico.
It is the second most prominent volcanic peak in the world after Africa's Mount Kilimanjaro.

Mount Everest

EverestMt. EverestMt Everest
For example, the encirclement parent of Mont Blanc, the highest peak in the Alps, is Mount Everest. The summit of Mount Everest is the parent peak of Aconcagua at a distance of 17,755 km (11,032 miles), as well as the parent of the South Summit of Mount Everest at a distance of 360 m (1200 feet).

List of Ultras of Africa

AfricaList of ultra-prominent summits of AfricaList of African Ultras
This is a list of all the Ultra prominent peaks (with topographic prominence greater than 1,500 metres) in Africa.

List of Ultras of Antarctica

Mountains in AntarcticaList of ultra-prominent summits of AntarcticaList of mountains in Antarctica
This is a list of all the Ultra prominent peaks (with topographic prominence greater than 1,500 metres) in Antarctica.

List of Ultras of Oceania

List of ultra-prominent summits of AustraliaList of the ultra-prominent summits of HawaiiList of ultra-prominent summits of Indonesian New Guinea
This is a list of the 67 ultra-prominent summits (with topographic prominence greater than 1,500 metres) of Oceania, plus the two Ultras of the Southern Indian Ocean.

List of Alpine peaks by prominence

List of ultra-prominent summits of the Alpsalpine ultra-prominent peakhighest
This is a list of the mountains of the Alps, ordered by their topographic prominence.

List of mountains of the British Isles by height

SimmList of mountains and hills of the United KingdomList of mountains of the British Isles by prominence
Height and prominence are the most important metrics for the classifications of mountains by the UIAA; with isolation a distant third criterion.

List of European ultra-prominent peaks

List of European ultra prominent peaksList of the highest European ultra-prominent peaksList of non-Alpine European Ultras
This is a list of all the mountains in Europe with ultra-prominent peaks with topographic prominence greater than 1500 m. The column "Col" denotes the highest elevation to which one must descend from a peak in order to reach peaks with higher elevations; note that the elevation of any peak is the sum of its prominence and col.

List of Ultras of North America

List of the most prominent summits of North AmericaList of the ultra-prominent summits of North AmericaList of ultra-prominent summits of North America
The following sortable tables comprise the most topographically prominent mountain peaks of greater North America.

List of the most prominent summits of the United States

most prominent summits of the United StatesprominenceUS most prominent peaks
The following sortable table comprises the 200 most topographically prominent mountain peaks of the United States of America.

List of New England Fifty Finest

New England Fifty FinestList of the most prominent summits of New England50 Finest
The list comprises the 50 summits with the highest topographic prominence — a peak's height above the lowest contour which encloses that peak and no higher peak.