Tornado

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A tornado is a rapidly rotating column of air that is in contact with both the surface of the Earth and a cumulonimbus cloud or, in rare cases, the base of a cumulus cloud.wikipedia
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Tornado records

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The most extreme tornadoes can attain wind speeds of more than 300 mph, are more than 2 mi in diameter, and stay on the ground for dozens of miles (more than 100 km).
This article lists various tornado records. The most "extreme" tornado in recorded history was the Tri-State Tornado, which spread through parts of Missouri, Illinois, and Indiana on March 18, 1925.

Cumulonimbus cloud

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A tornado is a rapidly rotating column of air that is in contact with both the surface of the Earth and a cumulonimbus cloud or, in rare cases, the base of a cumulus cloud.
These clouds are capable of producing lightning and other dangerous severe weather, such as tornadoes.

Debris

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Tornadoes come in many shapes and sizes, and they are often visible in the form of a condensation funnel originating from the base of a cumulonimbus cloud, with a cloud of rotating debris and dust beneath it. Most tornadoes have wind speeds less than 110 mph, are about 250 ft across, and travel a few miles (several kilometers) before dissipating.
In disaster scenarios, tornadoes leave behind large pieces of houses and mass destruction overall.

Multiple-vortex tornado

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Various types of tornadoes include the multiple vortex tornado, landspout and waterspout.
A multiple-vortex tornado is a tornado that contains several vortices (called subvortices or suction vortices) rotating around, inside of, and as part of the main vortex.

Cyclone

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The windstorm is often referred to as a twister, whirlwind or cyclone, although the word cyclone is used in meteorology to name a weather system with a low-pressure area in the center around which winds blow counterclockwise in the Northern Hemisphere and clockwise in the Southern.
Mesocyclones, tornadoes and dust devils lie within smaller mesoscale.

Dust devil

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Other tornado-like phenomena that exist in nature include the gustnado, dust devil, fire whirl, and steam devil.
They are comparable to tornadoes in that both are a weather phenomenon involving a vertically oriented rotating column of wind.

List of F5 and EF5 tornadoes

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An F5 or EF5 tornado, the strongest category, rips buildings off their foundations and can deform large skyscrapers.
Among the most violent known meteorological events are tornadoes.

Landspout

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Various types of tornadoes include the multiple vortex tornado, landspout and waterspout.
A landspout is a term coined by meteorologist Howard B. Bluestein in 1985 for a kind of tornado not associated with a mesocyclone.

Whirlwind

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The windstorm is often referred to as a twister, whirlwind or cyclone, although the word cyclone is used in meteorology to name a weather system with a low-pressure area in the center around which winds blow counterclockwise in the Northern Hemisphere and clockwise in the Southern.
The first category includes tornadoes, waterspouts, and landspouts.

Fujita scale

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The Fujita scale rates tornadoes by damage caused and has been replaced in some countries by the updated Enhanced Fujita Scale.
The Fujita scale (F-Scale), or Fujita–Pearson scale (FPP scale), is a scale for rating tornado intensity, based primarily on the damage tornadoes inflict on human-built structures and vegetation.

Supercell

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They are generally classified as non-supercellular tornadoes that develop over bodies of water, but there is disagreement over whether to classify them as true tornadoes.
Supercells are one of the few types of clouds that typically spawn tornadoes within the mesocyclone, although only 30% or fewer do so.

Waterspout

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Various types of tornadoes include the multiple vortex tornado, landspout and waterspout.
In the common form, it is a non-supercell tornado over water.

TORRO scale

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The similar TORRO scale ranges from a T0 for extremely weak tornadoes to T11 for the most powerful known tornadoes.
The TORRO tornado intensity scale (or T-Scale) is a scale measuring tornado intensity between T0 and T11.

Fire whirl

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Other tornado-like phenomena that exist in nature include the gustnado, dust devil, fire whirl, and steam devil.
These eddies can contract a tornado-like vortex that sucks in burning debris and combustible gases.

Derecho

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Tornadoes opposite phenomena are the derechoes (, from derecho, "straight").
Derechos can cause hurricane-force winds, tornadoes, heavy rains, and flash floods.

Twister (1996 film)

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The term "twister" is also used in that film, along with being the title of the 1996 tornado-related film Twister.
Twister is a 1996 American epic action disaster adventure film starring Helen Hunt and Bill Paxton as storm chasers researching tornadoes.

Steam devil

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Other tornado-like phenomena that exist in nature include the gustnado, dust devil, fire whirl, and steam devil.
The latter are more akin to weak tornadoes over water.

Vortex

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Tornado refers to the vortex of wind, not the condensation cloud.
Vortices form in stirred fluids, and may be observed in smoke rings, whirlpools in the wake of a boat, and the winds surrounding a tropical cyclone, tornado or dust devil.

2013 El Reno tornado

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A tornado that affected Hallam, Nebraska on May 22, 2004, was up to 2.5 mi wide at the ground, and a tornado in El Reno, Oklahoma on May 31, 2013 was approximately 2.6 mi wide, the widest on record.
The El Reno tornado was a very large EF3 tornado that occurred over rural areas of Central Oklahoma during the early evening of Friday, May 31, 2013.

Gustnado

Other tornado-like phenomena that exist in nature include the gustnado, dust devil, fire whirl, and steam devil.
The name is a portmanteau of "gust front tornado", as gustnadoes form due to non-tornadic straight-line wind features in the downdraft (outflow), specifically within the gust front of strong thunderstorms.

The Wizard of Oz (1939 film)

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The term "cyclone" is used as a synonym for "tornado" in the often-aired 1939 film The Wizard of Oz.
Dorothy races home, arriving just as a powerful tornado strikes.

Tornado debris signature

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Tornadoes can be detected before or as they occur through the use of Pulse-Doppler radar by recognizing patterns in velocity and reflectivity data, such as hook echoes or debris balls, as well as through the efforts of storm spotters.
A tornadic debris signature (TDS), often colloquially referred to as a debris ball, is an area of high reflectivity on weather radar caused by debris lofting into the air, usually associated with a tornado.

Hook echo

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Tornadoes can be detected before or as they occur through the use of Pulse-Doppler radar by recognizing patterns in velocity and reflectivity data, such as hook echoes or debris balls, as well as through the efforts of storm spotters.
It is one of the classic hallmarks of tornado-producing supercells.

Anticyclonic tornado

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On rare occasions, anticyclonic tornadoes form in association with the mesoanticyclone of an anticyclonic supercell, in the same manner as the typical cyclonic tornado, or as a companion tornado either as a satellite tornado or associated with anticyclonic eddies within a supercell.
An anticyclonic tornado is a tornado which rotates in a clockwise direction in the Northern Hemisphere and a counterclockwise direction in the Southern Hemisphere.

Tornado outbreak sequence of May 2004

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A tornado that affected Hallam, Nebraska on May 22, 2004, was up to 2.5 mi wide at the ground, and a tornado in El Reno, Oklahoma on May 31, 2013 was approximately 2.6 mi wide, the widest on record.
The Central Plains were hit by two significant outbreaks on May 22 and May 24, the first outbreak which produced a very large and violent tornado in Hallam, Nebraska.