Torsion spring

torsion balancetorsion pendulumtorsion coefficienttorsion bartorsiontorsion springstorsional constantCoupled Torsional Pendulumelectric pendulumspring constant
A torsion spring is a spring that works by twisting its end along its axis; that is, a flexible elastic object that stores mechanical energy when it is twisted.wikipedia
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Spring (device)

springspringsspring-loaded
A torsion spring is a spring that works by twisting; when it is twisted about its axis by an angle, it produces a torque proportional to the angle.

Mainspring

mainspring barrelsspringspring motor
A mainspring is a spiral torsion spring of metal ribbon—commonly spring steel—used as a power source in mechanical watches, some clocks, and other clockwork mechanisms.

Anti-roll bar

sway baranti-roll barsstabilizer bar
It connects opposite (left/right) wheels together through short lever arms linked by a torsion spring.

Trunk (car)

boottrunktailgate
Other uses are in the large, coiled torsion springs used to counterbalance the weight of garage doors, and a similar system is used to assist in opening the trunk (boot) cover on some sedans.
Counterbalancing torsion or other spring(s) can also be used to help elevate and hold open the trunk lid.

Torsion pendulum clock

Anniversary clockclock springKundo
A torsion pendulum clock, more commonly known as an anniversary clock or 400-day clock, is a mechanical clock which keeps time with a mechanism called a torsion pendulum.

Balance wheel

foliotbalancecompensation balance
It is a weighted wheel that rotates back and forth, being returned toward its center position by a spiral torsion spring, the balance spring or hairspring.

Balance spring

hairspringisochronousbalance spring or "hair spring
The balance spring is a fine spiral or helical torsion spring used in mechanical watches, alarm clocks, kitchen timers, marine chronometers, and other timekeeping mechanisms to control the rate of oscillation of the balance wheel.

Ballista

ballistaeballistasarcuballista
With the invention of torsion spring bundle technology, the first ballista was built.

Scorpio (weapon)

scorpioscorpionscorpions
It used a system of torsion springs to propel the projectiles.

Cavendish experiment

Torsion bar experiment1798 experimentCavendish pendulum
Its most well-known uses were by Coulomb to measure the electrostatic force between charges to establish Coulomb's Law, and by Henry Cavendish in 1798 in the Cavendish experiment to measure the gravitational force between two masses to calculate the density of the Earth, leading later to a value for the gravitational constant.
The experiment was devised sometime before 1783 by geologist John Michell, who constructed a torsion balance apparatus for it.

Garage door

doordoorsGarage Doors
Other uses are in the large, coiled torsion springs used to counterbalance the weight of garage doors, and a similar system is used to assist in opening the trunk (boot) cover on some sedans.
A torsion spring counterbalance system consists of one or two tightly wound up springs on a steel shaft with cable drums at both ends.

Digital micromirror device

DMD digital micromirror devices or DMDdigital micromirror technology
Each one is mounted on a yoke which in turn is connected to two support posts by compliant torsion hinges.

Coulomb's law

Coulomb forceelectrostatic forceCoulomb interaction
Its most well-known uses were by Coulomb to measure the electrostatic force between charges to establish Coulomb's Law, and by Henry Cavendish in 1798 in the Cavendish experiment to measure the gravitational force between two masses to calculate the density of the Earth, leading later to a value for the gravitational constant.
He used a torsion balance to study the repulsion and attraction forces of charged particles, and determined that the magnitude of the electric force between two point charges is directly proportional to the product of the charges and inversely proportional to the square of the distance between them.

Nichols radiometer

light exerts pressure
This led to its use in other scientific instruments, such as galvanometers, and the Nichols radiometer which measured the radiation pressure of light.
It consisted of a pair of small silvered glass mirrors suspended in the manner of a torsion balance by a fine quartz fibre within an enclosure in which the air pressure could be regulated.

Henry Cavendish

CavendishCavendish balanceCavendish, Henry
Its most well-known uses were by Coulomb to measure the electrostatic force between charges to establish Coulomb's Law, and by Henry Cavendish in 1798 in the Cavendish experiment to measure the gravitational force between two masses to calculate the density of the Earth, leading later to a value for the gravitational constant.
The apparatus Cavendish used for weighing the Earth was a modification of the torsion balance built by Englishman and geologist John Michell, who died before he could begin the experiment.

Charles-Augustin de Coulomb

CoulombCharles CoulombCharles Augustin de Coulomb
The torsion balance, also called torsion pendulum, is a scientific apparatus for measuring very weak forces, usually credited to Charles-Augustin de Coulomb, who invented it in 1777, but independently invented by John Michell sometime before 1783.
This memoir contained the results of Coulomb's experiments on the torsional force for metal wires, specifically within a torsion balance.

Gravitational constant

Newton's constantGuniversal gravitational constant
Its most well-known uses were by Coulomb to measure the electrostatic force between charges to establish Coulomb's Law, and by Henry Cavendish in 1798 in the Cavendish experiment to measure the gravitational force between two masses to calculate the density of the Earth, leading later to a value for the gravitational constant.
implicitly, using a torsion balance invented by the geologist Rev. John Michell (1753).

Harmonic oscillator

harmonic oscillatorsharmonic oscillationdamped harmonic oscillator
If the free balance is twisted and released, it will oscillate slowly clockwise and counterclockwise as a harmonic oscillator, at a frequency that depends on the moment of inertia of the beam and the elasticity of the fiber.

Mechanical energy

mechanicalconservation of mechanical energyenergy

Fiber