Tory

ToriesToryismConservativeTory partyTory-ismHigh ToriesLoyalistsimilar meaningTorieTory MP
A Tory is a person who holds a political philosophy known as Toryism, based on a British version of traditionalism and conservatism, which upholds the supremacy of social order as it has evolved in the English culture throughout history.wikipedia
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Traditionalist conservatism

traditional valuesTraditionalismtraditionalist
A Tory is a person who holds a political philosophy known as Toryism, based on a British version of traditionalism and conservatism, which upholds the supremacy of social order as it has evolved in the English culture throughout history.
Shortened to traditionalism and in the United Kingdom and Canada referred to as Toryism, traditionalist conservatism is a variant of conservatism based on the political philosophies of Aristotle and Edmund Burke.

Tories (British political party)

ToryToriesTory Party
The Tories political faction that emerged in 1681 was a reaction to the Whig-controlled Parliaments that succeeded the Cavalier Parliament.
One faction, led by Edward Smith-Stanley, 14th Earl of Derby and Benjamin Disraeli, survived to become the modern Conservative Party, whose members are commonly still referred to as Tories as they still often follow and promote the ideology of Toryism.

Conservative Party (UK)

ConservativeConservative PartyConservatives
The British Conservative Party and Conservative Party of Canada, and their members, continue to be referred to as Tories.
The Conservative Party was founded in 1834 from the Tory Party—the Conservatives' colloquial name is "Tories"—and was one of two dominant political parties in the nineteenth century, along with the Liberal Party.

High Tory

High ToriesHigh Toryismextreme Tory
Adherents to traditional Toryism in contemporary times are referred to as High Tories.
High Toryism (sometimes referred to as conservative gentryism) is a term used in Britain, and elsewhere, to refer to old traditionalist conservatism which is in line with the Toryism originating in the 17th century.

Red Tory

Red ToriesRed ToryismRed
The terms Blue Tory and Red Tory have been used to describe the two different factions of the federal and provincial Conservative/Progressive Conservative parties in Canada.
A Red Tory is an adherent of a centre-right or paternalistic-conservative political philosophy derived from the Tory tradition, predominantly in Canada, but also in the United Kingdom.

Whigs (British political party)

WhigWhigsWhig Party
The Tories political faction that emerged in 1681 was a reaction to the Whig-controlled Parliaments that succeeded the Cavalier Parliament. Tories generally advocate monarchism, and were historically of a high church Anglican religious heritage, opposed to the liberalism of the Whig faction.
After the Glorious Revolution of 1688, Queen Mary II and King William III governed with both Whigs and Tories, despite the fact that many of the Tories still supported the deposed Roman Catholic James II.

Cavalier

RoyalistRoyalistsCavaliers
The philosophy originates from the Cavalier faction, a royalist group during the English Civil War. It was also used to refer to a Rapparee and later applied to Confederates or Cavaliers in arms. The term was initially applied in Ireland to the isolated bands of guerrillas resisting Oliver Cromwell's nine-month 1649–1650 campaign in Ireland, who were allied with Royalists through treaty with the Parliament of Confederate Ireland, signed at Kilkenny in January 1649; and later to dispossessed Catholics in Ulster following the Restoration.
It was soon reappropriated (as a title of honour) by the king's party, who in return applied Roundhead to their opponents, and at the Restoration the court party preserved the name, which survived until the rise of the term Tory.

Charles II of England

Charles IIKing Charles IIKing Charles II of England
Towards the end of Charles II's reign (1660–1685) there was some debate about whether his brother, James, Duke of York, should be allowed to succeed to the throne.
The crisis saw the birth of the pro-exclusion Whig and anti-exclusion Tory parties.

High church

high-churchHigh AnglicanHigh
Tories generally advocate monarchism, and were historically of a high church Anglican religious heritage, opposed to the liberalism of the Whig faction.
Eventually, under Queen Anne, the High Church party saw its fortunes revive with those of the Tory party, with which it was then strongly associated.

Loyalist (American Revolution)

LoyalistLoyalistsTories
It also has exponents in other parts of the former British Empire, such as the Loyalists of British America, who opposed American secession during the American War of Independence.
Loyalists were American colonists who stayed loyal to the British Crown during the American Revolutionary War, often called Tories, Royalists, or King's Men at the time.

Exclusion Crisis

Exclusion BillExclusionExclusionist
Towards the end of Charles II's reign (1660–1685) there was some debate about whether his brother, James, Duke of York, should be allowed to succeed to the throne. James became a Roman Catholic at a time when the state institutions were fiercely independent from the Roman Catholic Church—this was an issue for the Exclusion Crisis supporting Patricians, the political heirs to the nonconformist Roundheads and Covenanters.
The Tories were opposed to this exclusion while the "Country Party", who were soon to be called the Whigs, supported it.

Whiggism

WhigWhigsWhiggery
The suffix -ism was quickly added to both Whig and Tory to make Whiggism and Toryism, meaning the principles and methods of each faction.
The opposing Tory position was held by the other great families, the Church of England, most of the landed gentry and officers of the army and the navy.

Cavalier Parliament

Cavalier1661Restoration Parliament
The Tories political faction that emerged in 1681 was a reaction to the Whig-controlled Parliaments that succeeded the Cavalier Parliament.
The factions of a "party political" system thus gradually emerged in parliament, polarised between the Coventry-led "Country Party" (ancestral to the Whigs) and the "Court Party" (supporters of the king's council, ancestral to the Tories).

Politics of the United Kingdom

British politicsBritish politicianBritish Government
Toryism remains prominent in Canada and the United Kingdom.
The Court Party soon became known as the Tories, a name that has stuck despite the official name being 'Conservative'.

Conservative Party of Canada

ConservativeConservative PartyConservatives
The British Conservative Party and Conservative Party of Canada, and their members, continue to be referred to as Tories.
In October and November, during the course of the PC party's process of ratifying the merger, four sitting Progressive Conservative MPs — André Bachand, John Herron, former Tory leadership candidate Scott Brison, and former Prime Minister Joe Clark — announced their intention not to join the new Conservative Party caucus, as did retiring PC Party president Bruck Easton.

Rapparee

toriesTóraidherapparees
It was also used to refer to a Rapparee and later applied to Confederates or Cavaliers in arms.
In the 1690s, during the Glorious Revolution, the label "tory" was insultingly given to the English supporters of James II, to associate them with the Irish rebels and bandits of a generation earlier.

Clear Grits

Clear GritGritGrit hive
The dyadic tensions originally arose out of the 1854 political union of British-Canadian Tories, French-Canadian traditionalists and the monarchist and loyalist leaning sections of the emerging commercial classes at the time—many of whom were uncomfortable with the pro-American and annexationist tendencies within the liberal Clear Grits.
The word "Grit" is used as a neutral reference to members of the Liberal Party in English Canada (similar to how "Tory" is often used to refer to supporters of Conservative parties at both the federal and provincial levels).

George III of the United Kingdom

George IIIKing George IIIGeorge III of Great Britain
After the advent of the Prime Ministerial system under the Whig Robert Walpole, Lord Bute's premiership in the reign of George III marked a revival.
George was also perceived as favouring Tory ministers, which led to his denunciation by the Whigs as an autocrat.

Restoration (Ireland)

RestorationIrish RestorationRestoration of the monarchy in Ireland
The term was initially applied in Ireland to the isolated bands of guerrillas resisting Oliver Cromwell's nine-month 1649–1650 campaign in Ireland, who were allied with Royalists through treaty with the Parliament of Confederate Ireland, signed at Kilkenny in January 1649; and later to dispossessed Catholics in Ulster following the Restoration.
Landless Catholics who struggled against the Protestants who had bought their land were known as tóraidhe or tories.

James II of England

James IIKing James IIJames, Duke of York
Towards the end of Charles II's reign (1660–1685) there was some debate about whether his brother, James, Duke of York, should be allowed to succeed to the throne.
The Exclusion Crisis contributed to the development of the English two-party system: the Whigs were those who supported the Bill, while the Tories were those who opposed it.

Conservatism

conservativeconservativesReligious conservatism
Conservatism began to emerge in the late 18th century—it synthesised moderate Whig economic positions and many Tory social values to create a new political philosophy and faction in opposition to the French Revolution.
Paternalistic conservatism first arose as a distinct ideology in the United Kingdom under Prime Minister Benjamin Disraeli's "One Nation" Toryism.

George I of Great Britain

George IKing George IKing George
A large but dwindling faction of Tories continued to support James in exile and his Stuart heirs to the throne, especially in 1714 after the accession of George I, the first Hanoverian monarch.
Whig politicians believed Parliament had the right to determine the succession, and to bestow it on the nearest Protestant relative of the Queen, while many Tories were more inclined to believe in the hereditary right of the Catholic Stuarts, who were nearer relations.

Liberal Party of Canada

LiberalLiberal PartyLiberals
The term is used in contrast to "Grit", a shorthand for the Liberal Party of Canada.
Laurier was able to capitalize on the Tories' alienation of French Canada by offering the Liberals as a credible alternative.

George Grant (philosopher)

George GrantGeorge Parkin GrantGeorge Parkin Gran
A "Red Tory" is a member of the more moderate wing of the party (in the manner of John Farthing and George Grant).
Grant's works of the 1960s had a strong influence on the nationalist movement of the 1970s, though many of the New Left were uncomfortable with Grant's conservatism, his conventional Anglican Tory beliefs, Christian-Platonist perspective, and his uncompromising position against abortion.

Roundhead

ParliamentarianParliamentariansParliamentary
James became a Roman Catholic at a time when the state institutions were fiercely independent from the Roman Catholic Church—this was an issue for the Exclusion Crisis supporting Patricians, the political heirs to the nonconformist Roundheads and Covenanters.
Likewise during the Exclusion Bill crisis, the term Cavalier was replaced with "Tory", an Irish term introduced by their opponents, and also initially a pejorative term.