Touchscreen

touch screencapacitive touchscreenscreentouch-screencapacitivetouchscreenstouch paneltouch-sensitiveTouchtouch screens
A touchscreen, or touch screen, is a both input and output device and normally layered on the top of an electronic visual display of an information processing system.wikipedia
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Multi-touch

multitouchmulti-touch gesturespinch-to-zoom
A user can give input or control the information processing system through simple or multi-touch gestures by touching the screen with a special stylus or one or more fingers.
In computing, multi-touch is technology that enables a surface (a trackpad or touchscreen) to recognize the presence of more than one point of contact with the surface.

Stylus (computing)

stylusstylus penpen
A user can give input or control the information processing system through simple or multi-touch gestures by touching the screen with a special stylus or one or more fingers.
In computing, a stylus (or stylus pen) is a small pen-shaped instrument whose tip position on a touchscreen can be detected by the screen.

Personal digital assistant

PDAPDAspersonal digital assistants
They play a prominent role in the design of digital appliances such as personal digital assistants (PDAs) and some e-readers. In 1991–1992, the Sun Star7 prototype PDA implemented a touchscreen with inertial scrolling.
Sometimes, instead of buttons, PDAs employ touchscreen technology.

Frank Beck (computer scientist)

Frank BeckFrank Beck
Frank Beck and Bent Stumpe, engineers from CERN (European Organization for Nuclear Research), developed a transparent touchscreen in the early 1970s, based on Stumpe's work at a television factory in the early 1960s.
Dr Frank Beck (born 28 December 1930) is a British computer scientist who pioneered the application of user-interface hardware including the touchscreen, the computer-controlled knob and the video wall while working at CERN during the 1970s.

Point of sale

point-of-salePOScheckout
Touchscreens are common in devices such as game consoles, personal computers, electronic voting machines, and point-of-sale (POS) systems.
In 1986, Gene Mosher introduced the first graphical point of sale software featuring a touchscreen interface under the ViewTouch trademark on the 16-bit Atari 520ST color computer.

HP-150

HP 150
A similar touchscreen was used on the HP-150 starting in 1983.
It was based on the Intel 8088 and was one of the world's earliest commercialized touch screen computers.

Computer

computerscomputer systemdigital computer
The finished device was dubbed the ECC for "Electronic Control Center", a digital computer and software control system hardwired to various peripheral sensors, servos, solenoids, antenna and a monochrome CRT touchscreen that functioned both as display and sole method of input.
Peripheral devices include input devices (keyboards, mice, joystick, etc.), output devices (monitor screens, printers, etc.), and input/output devices that perform both functions (e.g., the 2000s-era touchscreen).

Computer mouse

mousemicecomputer mice
The touchscreen enables the user to interact directly with what is displayed, rather than using a mouse, touchpad, or other such devices (other than a stylus, which is optional for most modern touchscreens). Touchscreens are found in the medical field, heavy industry, automated teller machines (ATMs), and kiosks such as museum displays or room automation, where keyboard and mouse systems do not allow a suitably intuitive, rapid, or accurate interaction by the user with the display's content.
The user requires only small wrist rotations to move the cursor, reducing user fatigue or "gorilla arm".

Personal computer

PCPCspersonal computers
Touchscreens are common in devices such as game consoles, personal computers, electronic voting machines, and point-of-sale (POS) systems.
A separate keyboard and mouse are standard input devices, with some monitors including touchscreen capability.

Automated teller machine

ATMATMsautomatic teller machine
Touchscreens are found in the medical field, heavy industry, automated teller machines (ATMs), and kiosks such as museum displays or room automation, where keyboard and mouse systems do not allow a suitably intuitive, rapid, or accurate interaction by the user with the display's content.

University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign

University of IllinoisUniversity of Illinois at Urbana-ChampaignIllinois
In 1972, a group at the University of Illinois filed for a patent on an optical touchscreen that became a standard part of the Magnavox Plato IV Student Terminal and thousands were built for this purpose.

Scrolling

scrollinfinite scrollingscrolls
In 1991–1992, the Sun Star7 prototype PDA implemented a touchscreen with inertial scrolling.
Scrolling may take place completely without user intervention (as in film credits) or, on an interactive device, be triggered by touchscreen or a keypress and continue without further intervention until a further user action, or be entirely controlled by input devices.

Lock screen

unlockingunlocks the device
In 1990, HCIL demonstrated a touchscreen slider, which was later cited as prior art in the lock screen patent litigation between Apple and other touchscreen mobile phone vendors (in relation to ).
They regulate immediate access to a device by requiring that the user perform a certain action in order to receive access, such as entering a password, using a certain button combination, or performing a certain gesture using a device's touchscreen.

LG Prada

LG Prada (KE850)PradaLG KE850 (Prada)
The first mobile phone with a capacitive touchscreen was LG Prada released in May 2007 (which was before the first iPhone).
The LG KE850, also known as the LG Prada, is a touchscreen mobile phone made by LG Electronics.

Nintendo DS

DSNDSDS Download Play
Touchscreens would not be popularly used for video games until the release of the Nintendo DS in 2004.
The DS, an acronym for "Developers' System" or "Dual Screen", introduced distinctive new features to handheld gaming: two LCD screens working in tandem (the bottom one being a touchscreen), a built-in microphone, and support for wireless connectivity.

Game controller

controllerVideo game controllercontrollers
An early attempt at a handheld game console with touchscreen controls was Sega's intended successor to the Game Gear, though the device was ultimately shelved and never released due to the expensive cost of touchscreen technology in the early 1990s.
Controllers have since evolved to include directional pads, multiple buttons, analog sticks, joysticks, motion detection, touch screens and a plethora of other features.

IPhone (1st generation)

iPhoneoriginal iPhoneiPhone 2G
The first mobile phone with a capacitive touchscreen was LG Prada released in May 2007 (which was before the first iPhone).
In 2005, Apple CEO Steve Jobs conceived an idea of using a touchscreen to interact with a computer in a way in which he could directly type onto the display, instead of requiring a stylus which was common on existing technology of the time.

Casio PB-1000

In 1987, Casio launched the Casio PB-1000 pocket computer with a touchscreen consisting of a 4×4 matrix, resulting in 16 touch areas in its small LCD graphic screen.
It featured a touchscreen display which consisted of 16 keys built into the screen, arranged in fixed positions on a four by four matrix.

Bent Stumpe

Frank Beck and Bent Stumpe, engineers from CERN (European Organization for Nuclear Research), developed a transparent touchscreen in the early 1970s, based on Stumpe's work at a television factory in the early 1960s.
Stumpe built in 1972, following an idea launched by Frank Beck, a capacitive touchscreen for controlling CERN's Super Proton Synchrotron accelerator.

Nintendo DS family

Nintendo DS lineNintendo DSDS
This is the type of touchscreen used by Nintendo in the DS family, the 3DS family, and the Wii U GamePad.
The DS was distinguished from its predecessor by featuring a folding "clamshell" form factor and two screens—the lower screen being a touchscreen enabling input with an included stylus pen.

User interface

UIinterfaceweb interface
Display manufacturers and chip manufacturers have acknowledged the trend toward acceptance of touchscreens as a user interface component and have begun to integrate touchscreens into the fundamental design of their products.

Building automation

intelligent buildingsmart buildingroom automation
Touchscreens are found in the medical field, heavy industry, automated teller machines (ATMs), and kiosks such as museum displays or room automation, where keyboard and mouse systems do not allow a suitably intuitive, rapid, or accurate interaction by the user with the display's content.
It is common for room automation systems to employ a touchscreen as the primary way of controlling each operation.

Wii U GamePad

GamePadGamePad controllercontroller
This is the type of touchscreen used by Nintendo in the DS family, the 3DS family, and the Wii U GamePad.
Incorporating traits from tablet computers, the GamePad has traditional input methods (such as buttons, dual analog sticks, and a D-pad), touchscreen controls, and motion controls.

Mobile device

mobile deviceshandheldmobile
Those for mobile devices are now being produced with 'in-cell' technology, such as in Samsung's Super AMOLED screens, that eliminates a layer by building the capacitors inside the display itself.
Typically, any handheld computer device will have an LCD or OLED flatscreen interface, providing a touchscreen interface with digital buttons and keyboard or physical buttons along with a physical keyboard.

Handheld game console

handheldhandheld video game consolehandheld console
An early attempt at a handheld game console with touchscreen controls was Sega's intended successor to the Game Gear, though the device was ultimately shelved and never released due to the expensive cost of touchscreen technology in the early 1990s.
Following Sega's success with the Game Gear, they began development on a successor during the early 1990s, which was intended to feature a touchscreen interface, many years before the Nintendo DS.