Tozama daimyō

tozamaoutside ''daimyōtozama daimyôtozama'' domain
A tozama daimyō was a daimyō who was considered an outsider by the rulers of Japan.wikipedia
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Daimyō

feudal lordlorddaimyo
A tozama daimyō was a daimyō who was considered an outsider by the rulers of Japan.
Major shugo-daimyō came from the Shiba, Hatakeyama, and Hosokawa clans, as well as the tozama clans of Yamana, Ōuchi, and Akamatsu.

Edo period

Edo-periodEdoTokugawa
The term came into use in the Kamakura period and continued until the end of the Edo period.
Ninety-seven han formed the third group, the tozama (outside vassals), former opponents or new allies.

Tokugawa shogunate

TokugawabakufuJapan
The daimyō who submitted to the Tokugawa shogunate after the Battle of Sekigahara—who became Tokugawa vassals only after the battle—were classified as tozama.
Tozama ("outsiders") became vassals of Ieyasu after the Battle of Sekigahara.

Shimazu clan

ShimazuSatsumaLords of Satsuma
Others included the Shimazu clan of Satsuma, the Mori, the Date, Hachisuka, and the Uesugi.
The Shimazu were identified as one of the tozama or outsider daimyō families in contrast with the fudai or insider clans which were hereditary vassals or allies of the Tokugawa clan.

Satsuma Domain

SatsumaSatsuma hanSatsuma-Han
Others included the Shimazu clan of Satsuma, the Mori, the Date, Hachisuka, and the Uesugi. Tozama daimyō from Satsuma and Chōshū (Shimazu and Mori clans respectively) were responsible for the fall of the Tokugawa shogunate during the Bakumatsu era.
It was controlled throughout the Edo period by the tozama daimyō of the Shimazu clan.

Uesugi clan

UesugiUesugi familyOgigayatsu Uesugi clan
Others included the Shimazu clan of Satsuma, the Mori, the Date, Hachisuka, and the Uesugi.
In the Edo period, the Uesugi were identified as one of the tozama or outsider clans, in contrast with the fudai or insider daimyō clans which were hereditary vassals or allies of the Tokugawa clan.

Date clan

DateDate samurai clani.e. “Date territory”
Others included the Shimazu clan of Satsuma, the Mori, the Date, Hachisuka, and the Uesugi.
In the Edo period, the Date were identified as one of the tozama or outsider clans, in contrast with the fudai or insider daimyō clans which were hereditary vassals or allies of the Tokugawa clan.

Maeda clan

MaedaMaeda Family
The biggest was the Maeda clan of Kaga with a value of 1,000,000 koku.
The Maeda clan attempted to maintain good relations with the Tokugawa clan through marriage ties, and, although a tozama clan, were permitted to use the "Matsudaira" name as an honorific patronym.

Tokugawa Ieyasu

Ieyasu TokugawaIeyasuTokugawa
Tokugawa Ieyasu had treated the great tozama vassals amicably but later, between 1623 and 1626, Tokugawa Iemitsu was less tolerant of them.
In later years the vassals who had pledged allegiance to Ieyasu before Sekigahara became known as the fudai daimyō, while those who pledged allegiance to him after the battle (in other words, after his power was unquestioned) were known as tozama daimyō.

Bakumatsu

opening of Japanlate Tokugawa shogunateJapan
However, this began to change in the Bakumatsu era; one tozama daimyō (Matsumae Takahiro) even became a rōjū. Tozama daimyō from Satsuma and Chōshū (Shimazu and Mori clans respectively) were responsible for the fall of the Tokugawa shogunate during the Bakumatsu era.
Furthermore, there were two other main driving forces for dissent: first, growing resentment on the part of the tozama daimyō (or outside lords), and second, growing anti-Western sentiment following the arrival of Matthew C. Perry.

Matsumae Takahiro

However, this began to change in the Bakumatsu era; one tozama daimyō (Matsumae Takahiro) even became a rōjū.
Though he was a tozama daimyō, he served in the Tokugawa Shogunate as a rōjū.

Fudai daimyō

fudaifudai'' domainfudai'' clan
To keep the tozama in check, the shogunate stationed fudai daimyō in strategic locations, including along major roads and near important cities.
In contrast to the tozama, the fudai typically ruled small fiefs, many in strategic locations along the principal roads or in the Kantō region near the headquarters of the shogunate at Edo.

Chōshū Domain

ChōshūChoshuChōshu
Tozama daimyō from Satsuma and Chōshū (Shimazu and Mori clans respectively) were responsible for the fall of the Tokugawa shogunate during the Bakumatsu era.
* Mōri clan (Tozama, 369,000 koku), 1600–1871

Aizu

Aizu DomainAizu clanAizu han
Rallying other tozama to their cause, they fought against the shogunate, Aizu, and the Ōuetsu Reppan Dōmei during the Boshin War of 1868–69.
* Gamō clan 1590–1598 (Tozama; 919,000 koku)

Boshin War

Boshin Civil WarJapanese Revolution1868 rebellion against the shogunate
Rallying other tozama to their cause, they fought against the shogunate, Aizu, and the Ōuetsu Reppan Dōmei during the Boshin War of 1868–69.

Japan

🇯🇵JPNJapanese
A tozama daimyō was a daimyō who was considered an outsider by the rulers of Japan.

Kamakura period

Japan (Kamakura period)KamakuraKamakura-period
The term came into use in the Kamakura period and continued until the end of the Edo period.

Battle of Sekigahara

SekigaharaSekigahara CampaignBattle at Sekigahara
The daimyō who submitted to the Tokugawa shogunate after the Battle of Sekigahara—who became Tokugawa vassals only after the battle—were classified as tozama.

Han system

feudal domainhandomain
Many of the largest fiefs were ruled by tozama.

Kaga Domain

KagaKaga clanKanazawa
The biggest was the Maeda clan of Kaga with a value of 1,000,000 koku.

Koku

Ricerice production (''koku'')
The biggest was the Maeda clan of Kaga with a value of 1,000,000 koku.

Mōri clan

MōriMori clanMori
Others included the Shimazu clan of Satsuma, the Mori, the Date, Hachisuka, and the Uesugi.

Hachisuka clan

HachisukaHachisuka FamilyHachisuka family head
Others included the Shimazu clan of Satsuma, the Mori, the Date, Hachisuka, and the Uesugi.

Vassal

vassalsvassalagefeudatory
Tokugawa Ieyasu had treated the great tozama vassals amicably but later, between 1623 and 1626, Tokugawa Iemitsu was less tolerant of them.

Tokugawa Iemitsu

IemitsuIemitsu TokugawaIyemitsu
Tokugawa Ieyasu had treated the great tozama vassals amicably but later, between 1623 and 1626, Tokugawa Iemitsu was less tolerant of them.