Trachea

windpipetrachealtracheaetracheal systemtracheastracheal ringVertebrate tracheawind pipeairwayAnnular ligaments of trachea
The trachea, colloquially called the windpipe, is a cartilaginous tube that connects the pharynx and larynx to the lungs, allowing the passage of air, and so is present in almost all air-breathing animals with lungs.wikipedia
684 Related Articles

Larynx

laryngealvoice boxlaryngologist
The trachea, colloquially called the windpipe, is a cartilaginous tube that connects the pharynx and larynx to the lungs, allowing the passage of air, and so is present in almost all air-breathing animals with lungs. It begins at the bottom of the larynx, and ends at the carina, the point where the trachea branches into left and right main bronchi.
The larynx, commonly called the voice box, is an organ in the top of the neck involved in breathing, producing sound and protecting the trachea against food aspiration.

Lung

lungspulmonaryright lung
The trachea, colloquially called the windpipe, is a cartilaginous tube that connects the pharynx and larynx to the lungs, allowing the passage of air, and so is present in almost all air-breathing animals with lungs.
The lungs are part of the lower respiratory tract that begins at the trachea and branches into the bronchi and bronchioles, and which receive air breathed in via the conducting zone.

Pharynx

nasopharynxoropharynxpharyngeal
The trachea, colloquially called the windpipe, is a cartilaginous tube that connects the pharynx and larynx to the lungs, allowing the passage of air, and so is present in almost all air-breathing animals with lungs.
(The conducting zone—which also includes the nostrils of the nose, the larynx, trachea, bronchi, and bronchioles—filters, warms and moistens air and conducts it into the lungs).

Cricoid cartilage

cricoidanterior cricoid arch
At the top of the trachea the cricoid cartilage attaches it to the larynx.
The cricoid cartilage, or simply cricoid (from the Greek krikoeides meaning "ring-shaped") or cricoid ring, is the only complete ring of cartilage around the trachea.

Epiglottis

epiglottic cartilageepiglotticpalate
The epiglottis closes the opening to the larynx during swallowing.
It is thus the valve that diverts passage to either the trachea or the esophagus.

Croup

laryngotracheobronchitisobstructive laryngitiscynanche trachealis
An inflammatory condition, also involving the larynx and bronchi, called croup can result in a barking cough.
The infection leads to swelling inside the trachea, which interferes with normal breathing and produces the classic symptoms of "barking" cough, stridor, and a hoarse voice.

Tracheotomy

tracheostomytracheotomiestracheostomy tube
A tracheotomy is often performed for ventilation in surgical operations where needed.
Tracheotomy (, UK also ), or tracheostomy, is a surgical procedure which consists of making an incision (cut) on the anterior aspect (front) of the neck and opening a direct airway through an incision in the trachea (windpipe).

Tracheal tube

endotracheal tubebreathing tubebreathing tubes
Intubation is also carried out for the same reason by the inserting of a tube into the trachea.
A tracheal tube is a catheter that is inserted into the trachea for the primary purpose of establishing and maintaining a patent airway and to ensure the adequate exchange of oxygen and carbon dioxide.

Goblet cell

goblet cellsglandular epithelial cellsgoblet
It is lined with an epithelium that has goblet cells which produce protective mucins (see Respiratory epithelium).
They are found inside the trachea, bronchi, and larger bronchioles in the respiratory tract, small intestines, the large intestine, and conjunctiva in the upper eyelid.

Trachealis muscle

trachealis
The trachealis muscle joins the ends of the rings and these are joined vertically by bands of fibrous connective tissue – the annular ligaments of trachea.
The trachealis muscle is a smooth muscle that bridges the gap between the free ends of C-shaped cartilages at the posterior border of the trachea, adjacent to the esophagus.

Hyaline cartilage

articular cartilagegristleCartilage
The trachea is surrounded by 16-20 rings of hyaline cartilage; these 'rings' are incomplete and C-shaped.
It is also most commonly found in the ribs, nose, larynx, and trachea.

Tracheole

tracheole cellstracheoles
Insects have an open respiratory system made up of spiracles, tracheae, and tracheoles to transport metabolic gases to and from tissues.
Tracheole (trā'kē-ōl') is a fine respiratory tube of the trachea of an insect or a spider, part of the respiratory system.

Carina of trachea

carinabifurcation of the tracheaTracheal bifurcation
It begins at the bottom of the larynx, and ends at the carina, the point where the trachea branches into left and right main bronchi.
In anatomy, the carina is a ridge of cartilage in the trachea that occurs between the division of the two main bronchi.

Respiratory system of insects

respiratory systemInsect respirationrespirate
Insects have an open respiratory system made up of spiracles, tracheae, and tracheoles to transport metabolic gases to and from tissues.
These external openings, which act as muscular valves in some insects, lead to the internal respiratory system, a densely networked array of tubes called tracheae.

Esophagus

oesophagusesophageallower esophageal sphincter
Behind the trachea, along its length, sits the oesophagus, followed by connective tissue and the vertebral column.
The esophagus is a fibromuscular tube, about 25 centimeters long in adults, which travels behind the trachea and heart, passes through the diaphragm and empties into the uppermost region of the stomach.

Aortic arch

arch of the aortaaortic knobisthmus of aorta
In front of the lower trachea lies the manubrium of the sternum, the remnants of the thymus in adults; to the front left the large blood vessels the aortic arch and its branches the left common carotid artery and the brachiocephalic trunk; and the left brachiocephalic vein.
The arch travels backward, so that it ultimately runs to the left of the trachea.

Thymus

thymus glandthymicmedulla
In front of the lower trachea lies the manubrium of the sternum, the remnants of the thymus in adults; to the front left the large blood vessels the aortic arch and its branches the left common carotid artery and the brachiocephalic trunk; and the left brachiocephalic vein.
In the neck, it lies on the front and sides of the trachea, behind the sternohyoidei and sternothyreoidei.

Blood

human bloodhematologicaloxygen consumption
The trachea mostly receives and drains blood through the inferior thyroid arteries and veins.
In most insects, this "blood" does not contain oxygen-carrying molecules such as hemoglobin because their bodies are small enough for their tracheal system to suffice for supplying oxygen.

Spiracle (arthropods)

spiraclespiraclesbreathing openings
Insects have an open respiratory system made up of spiracles, tracheae, and tracheoles to transport metabolic gases to and from tissues.
A spiracle or stigma is the opening in the exoskeletons of insects and some more derived spiders to allow air to enter the trachea.

Recurrent laryngeal nerve

recurrent nerverecurrent laryngeallaryngeal nerve
To its sides run the carotid arteries and inferior thyroid arteries; and to its sides on its back surface run the recurrent laryngeal nerves in the upper trachea, and the vagus nerves in the lower trachea.
After branching, the nerves typically ascend in a groove at the junction of the trachea and esophagus.

Cardiac plexus

cardiac
The deep cardiac plexus and lymph nodes are also positioned in front of the lower trachea.
The cardiac plexus is divided into a superficial part, which lies in the concavity of the aortic arch, and a deep part, between the aortic arch and the trachea.

Vagus nerve

vagusvagalcranial nerve X
To its sides run the carotid arteries and inferior thyroid arteries; and to its sides on its back surface run the recurrent laryngeal nerves in the upper trachea, and the vagus nerves in the lower trachea.
The right vagus nerve gives rise to the right recurrent laryngeal nerve, which hooks around the right subclavian artery and ascends into the neck between the trachea and esophagus.

Common carotid artery

carotidcarotid arteriescarotid artery
In front of the lower trachea lies the manubrium of the sternum, the remnants of the thymus in adults; to the front left the large blood vessels the aortic arch and its branches the left common carotid artery and the brachiocephalic trunk; and the left brachiocephalic vein. To its sides run the carotid arteries and inferior thyroid arteries; and to its sides on its back surface run the recurrent laryngeal nerves in the upper trachea, and the vagus nerves in the lower trachea.
In front, it is separated from the manubrium of the sternum by the sternohyoid and sternothyroid muscles, the anterior portions of the left pleura and lung, the left brachiocephalic vein, and the remains of the thymus; behind, it lies on the trachea, esophagus, left recurrent laryngeal nerve, and thoracic duct.

Bronchus

bronchibronchialbronchial tubes
An inflammatory condition, also involving the larynx and bronchi, called croup can result in a barking cough. It begins at the bottom of the larynx, and ends at the carina, the point where the trachea branches into left and right main bronchi. The trachea extends from the larynx and branches into the two primary bronchi.
The first bronchi to branch from the trachea are the right main bronchus and the left main bronchus, also known as the primary bronchi.

Lung bud

respiratory budrespiratory diverticulumlung buds
In the fourth week of development of the human embryo as the respiratory bud grows, the trachea separates from the foregut through the formation of tracheoesophageal ridges which fuse to form the tracheoesophageal septum and this separates the future trachea from the oesophagus and divides the foregut tube into the laryngotracheal tube.
The lung bud sometimes referred to as the respiratory bud forms from the respiratory diverticulum, an embryological endodermal structure that develops into the respiratory tract organs such as the larynx, trachea, bronchi and lungs.