Traditional Chinese medicine

Chinese medicineChinese traditional medicinemedicineTCMOriental Medicinetraditional medicineChinesetraditional Chinesetraditional Chinese medicinesChina
Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) is a branch of traditional medicine that is said to be based on more than 3,500 years of Chinese medical practice that includes various forms of herbal medicine, acupuncture, cupping therapy, gua sha, massage (tui na), bonesetter (die-da), exercise (qigong), and dietary therapy, but recently also influenced by modern Western medicine.wikipedia
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Chinese herbology

50 fundamental herbsChinese herbal medicineChinese herbs
Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) is a branch of traditional medicine that is said to be based on more than 3,500 years of Chinese medical practice that includes various forms of herbal medicine, acupuncture, cupping therapy, gua sha, massage (tui na), bonesetter (die-da), exercise (qigong), and dietary therapy, but recently also influenced by modern Western medicine.
Chinese herbology is the theory of traditional Chinese herbal therapy, which accounts for the majority of treatments in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM).

Traditional medicine

folk medicinefolk remedyfolk remedies
Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) is a branch of traditional medicine that is said to be based on more than 3,500 years of Chinese medical practice that includes various forms of herbal medicine, acupuncture, cupping therapy, gua sha, massage (tui na), bonesetter (die-da), exercise (qigong), and dietary therapy, but recently also influenced by modern Western medicine.
Practices known as traditional medicines include traditional European medicine, traditional Chinese medicine, traditional Korean medicine, traditional African medicine, Ayurveda, Siddha medicine, Unani, ancient Iranian Medicine, Iranian (Persian), Islamic medicine, Muti, and Ifá.

Gua sha

Cao gíoCoin rubbingCoining (traditional medicine)
Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) is a branch of traditional medicine that is said to be based on more than 3,500 years of Chinese medical practice that includes various forms of herbal medicine, acupuncture, cupping therapy, gua sha, massage (tui na), bonesetter (die-da), exercise (qigong), and dietary therapy, but recently also influenced by modern Western medicine.
Gua sha, kerokan or coining is part of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM).

Qigong

Qi GongChi KungChi Gong
Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) is a branch of traditional medicine that is said to be based on more than 3,500 years of Chinese medical practice that includes various forms of herbal medicine, acupuncture, cupping therapy, gua sha, massage (tui na), bonesetter (die-da), exercise (qigong), and dietary therapy, but recently also influenced by modern Western medicine.
With roots in Chinese medicine, philosophy, and martial arts, qigong is traditionally viewed by the Chinese and throughout Asia as a practice to cultivate and balance qi (pronounced approximately as "chi"), translated as "life energy".

Qi

kichich'i
One of the basic tenets of TCM is that the body's vital energy (ch'i or qi) is circulating through channels, called meridians, that have branches connected to bodily organs and functions." The existence of vital energy is not scientifically verified. Concepts of the body and of disease used in TCM reflect its ancient origins and its emphasis on dynamic processes over material structure, similar to European humoral theory.
Qi is the central underlying principle in Chinese traditional medicine and in Chinese martial arts.

Meridian (Chinese medicine)

meridiansmeridianjingluo
One of the basic tenets of TCM is that the body's vital energy (ch'i or qi) is circulating through channels, called meridians, that have branches connected to bodily organs and functions." The existence of vital energy is not scientifically verified. Concepts of the body and of disease used in TCM reflect its ancient origins and its emphasis on dynamic processes over material structure, similar to European humoral theory.
The meridian system (, also called channel network) is a concept in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) about a path through which the life-energy known as "qi" flows.

Yin and yang

yin-yangyinyang
The doctrines of Chinese medicine are rooted in books such as the Yellow Emperor's Inner Canon and the Treatise on Cold Damage, as well as in cosmological notions such as yin–yang and the five phases.
This duality lies at the origins of many branches of classical Chinese science and philosophy, as well as being a primary guideline of traditional Chinese medicine, and a central principle of different forms of Chinese martial arts and exercise, such as baguazhang, taijiquan (t'ai chi), and qigong (Chi Kung), as well as appearing in the pages of the I Ching.

Huangdi Neijing

Huang Di Nei JingThe Yellow Emperor's Classic of Internal MedicineYellow Emperor's Inner Canon
The doctrines of Chinese medicine are rooted in books such as the Yellow Emperor's Inner Canon and the Treatise on Cold Damage, as well as in cosmological notions such as yin–yang and the five phases.
Huangdi Neijing, literally the Inner Canon of the Yellow Emperor or Esoteric Scripture of the Yellow Emperor, is an ancient Chinese medical text that has been treated as the fundamental doctrinal source for Chinese medicine for more than two millennia.

Wuxing (Chinese philosophy)

Five ElementsWu XingFive Phases
The doctrines of Chinese medicine are rooted in books such as the Yellow Emperor's Inner Canon and the Treatise on Cold Damage, as well as in cosmological notions such as yin–yang and the five phases.
After it came to maturity in the second or first century BCE during the Han dynasty, this device was employed in many fields of early Chinese thought, including seemingly disparate fields such as geomancy or feng shui, astrology, traditional Chinese medicine, music, military strategy, and martial arts.

Acupuncture

acupuncturistacupuncture pointacupuncture points
Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) is a branch of traditional medicine that is said to be based on more than 3,500 years of Chinese medical practice that includes various forms of herbal medicine, acupuncture, cupping therapy, gua sha, massage (tui na), bonesetter (die-da), exercise (qigong), and dietary therapy, but recently also influenced by modern Western medicine.
Acupuncture is a form of alternative medicine and a key component of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) in which thin needles are inserted into the body.

Dit Da

bonesetter (die-da)die-daDit-Da
Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) is a branch of traditional medicine that is said to be based on more than 3,500 years of Chinese medical practice that includes various forms of herbal medicine, acupuncture, cupping therapy, gua sha, massage (tui na), bonesetter (die-da), exercise (qigong), and dietary therapy, but recently also influenced by modern Western medicine.
The medical practice was first originated from Guangdong, China and was usually practiced by martial artists who knew aspects of Traditional Chinese medicine.

Oracle bone

oracle bonesbonesplastromancy
Though the Shang did not have a concept of "medicine" as distinct from other fields, their oracular inscriptions on bones and tortoise shells refer to illnesses that affected the Shang royal family: eye disorders, toothaches, bloated abdomen, etc., which Shang elites usually attributed to curses sent by their ancestors.
During the 19th century, villagers in the area digging in the fields discovered a number of bones and used them as "dragon bones", a reference to the traditional Chinese medicine practice of grinding up Pleistocene fossils into tonics or poultices.

Tui na

tuinaAnmomassage (tui na)
Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) is a branch of traditional medicine that is said to be based on more than 3,500 years of Chinese medical practice that includes various forms of herbal medicine, acupuncture, cupping therapy, gua sha, massage (tui na), bonesetter (die-da), exercise (qigong), and dietary therapy, but recently also influenced by modern Western medicine.
Tui na is a hands-on body treatment that uses Chinese taoist principles in an effort to bring the eight principles of Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) into balance.

Cupping therapy

cuppingfire cuppinghijama
Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) is a branch of traditional medicine that is said to be based on more than 3,500 years of Chinese medical practice that includes various forms of herbal medicine, acupuncture, cupping therapy, gua sha, massage (tui na), bonesetter (die-da), exercise (qigong), and dietary therapy, but recently also influenced by modern Western medicine.
According to traditional Chinese medicine (TCM), cupping is done to dispel stagnation (stagnant blood and lymph), thereby improving qi flow, in order to treat respiratory diseases such as the common cold, pneumonia and bronchitis.

Zhang Zhongjing

ZhangZhang JiZhang Zhong-jing
The Treatise on Cold Damage Disorders and Miscellaneous Illnesses (Shang Han Lun) was collated by Zhang Zhongjing sometime between 196 and 220 CE; at the end of the Han dynasty.
He established medication principles and summed up the medicinal experience until that time, thus making a great contribution to the development of Traditional Chinese Medicine.

Zang-fu

Zang FuwuzangZang
Strict rules are identified to apply to the relationships between the Five Phases in terms of sequence, of acting on each other, of counteraction, etc. All these aspects of Five Phases theory constitute the basis of the zàng-fǔ concept, and thus have great influence regarding the TCM model of the body.
The zàng-fǔ organs are functional entities stipulated by Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM).

Shanghan Lun

Shang Han LunTreatise on Cold DamageTreatise on Cold Damage Disorders
The doctrines of Chinese medicine are rooted in books such as the Yellow Emperor's Inner Canon and the Treatise on Cold Damage, as well as in cosmological notions such as yin–yang and the five phases. Having gone through numerous changes over time, the formulary now circulates as two distinct books: the Treatise on Cold Damage Disorders and the Essential Prescriptions of the Golden Casket, which were edited separately in the eleventh century, under the Song dynasty.
It is a Traditional Chinese Medicine treatise that was compiled by Zhang Zhongjing sometime before 220 AD, at the end of the Han dynasty.

Jingui Yaolüe

Essential Prescriptions of the Golden CasketEssential Medical Treasures of the Golden ChamberJin Gui Yao Lue
Having gone through numerous changes over time, the formulary now circulates as two distinct books: the Treatise on Cold Damage Disorders and the Essential Prescriptions of the Golden Casket, which were edited separately in the eleventh century, under the Song dynasty.
Jingui Yaolüe, Essential Prescriptions from the Golden Cabinet is a classic clinical book of traditional Chinese medicine written by Zhang Zhongjing (150-219) at the end of the Eastern Han dynasty and was first published in the Northern Song dynasty.

China

People's Republic of ChinaChineseCHN
Traces of therapeutic activities in China date from the Shang dynasty (14th–11th centuries BCE).
At least 840 animal species are threatened, vulnerable or in danger of local extinction in China, due mainly to human activity such as habitat destruction, pollution and poaching for food, fur and ingredients for traditional Chinese medicine.

Kidney (Chinese medicine)

KidneyKidneys
The term zàng refers to the five entities considered to be yin in nature–Heart, Liver, Spleen, Lung, Kidney–, while fǔ refers to the six yang organs–Small Intestine, Large Intestine, Gallbladder, Urinary Bladder, Stomach and Sānjiaō.
According to traditional Chinese medicine, the kidney (Chinese: 腎: shèn) refers to either of the two viscera located on the small of the back, one either side of the spine.

Yellow Emperor

HuangdiHuang DiXuanyuan
Written in the form of dialogues between the legendary Yellow Emperor and his ministers, it offers explanations on the relation between humans, their environment, and the cosmos, on the contents of the body, on human vitality and pathology, on the symptoms of illness, and on how to make diagnostic and therapeutic decisions in light of all these factors.
The Yellow Emperor's Inner Canon (黃帝內經 Huángdì Nèijīng), which presents the doctrinal basis of traditional Chinese medicine, was named after him.

Small intestine (Chinese medicine)

Small Intestine
The term zàng refers to the five entities considered to be yin in nature–Heart, Liver, Spleen, Lung, Kidney–, while fǔ refers to the six yang organs–Small Intestine, Large Intestine, Gallbladder, Urinary Bladder, Stomach and Sānjiaō.
In traditional Chinese medicine the Small Intestine is a fu organ in the Zang-fu concept.

Nan Jing (Chinese medicine)

Nan JingA Sárga Császár nyolcvanegy nehéz kérdésének könyveNanjing
Nan Jing (Chinese medicine) was originally called "The Yellow Emperor Eighty-one Nan Jing", the book is rumoured to be authored by Bian que in eastern Han dynasty.
The Huangdi Bashiyi Nanjing (黃帝八十一難經 English: "The Huang Emperor's Canon of Eighty-One Difficult Issues"), often referred to simply as the Nan Jing, is one of the classics of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM).

Lung (Chinese medicine)

LungLungs
The term zàng refers to the five entities considered to be yin in nature–Heart, Liver, Spleen, Lung, Kidney–, while fǔ refers to the six yang organs–Small Intestine, Large Intestine, Gallbladder, Urinary Bladder, Stomach and Sānjiaō.
The lungs is one of the zang organs described in traditional Chinese medicine.

San Jiao

Triple BurnerSānjiaōJiao
The term zàng refers to the five entities considered to be yin in nature–Heart, Liver, Spleen, Lung, Kidney–, while fǔ refers to the six yang organs–Small Intestine, Large Intestine, Gallbladder, Urinary Bladder, Stomach and Sānjiaō.
San Jiao (triple burner, or triple energizer) is a concept in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) and acupuncture.