Transept

transeptsNorth Transeptsemitranseptsouth transeptcross-shapedcrossingnorth and south transeptssectionsside chambersside transepts
A transept (with two semitransepts) is a transverse part of any building, which lies across the main body of the edifice.wikipedia
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Nave

navessingle-navesanctuary
In churches, a transept is an area set crosswise to the nave in a cruciform ("cross-shaped") building within the Romanesque and Gothic Christian church architectural traditions.
The nave is the central part of a church, stretching from the (normally western) main entrance or rear wall, to the transepts, or in a church without transepts, to the chancel.

Gothic architecture

GothicGothic styleLate Gothic
In churches, a transept is an area set crosswise to the nave in a cruciform ("cross-shaped") building within the Romanesque and Gothic Christian church architectural traditions.
The cathedral usually has a transept, a crossing, roughly in the middle, which sometimes projects outwards some distance, and in other cases, such as Notre-Dame, is minimal.

Cruciform

cruciform churchcruciform plancruciform architectural plan
In churches, a transept is an area set crosswise to the nave in a cruciform ("cross-shaped") building within the Romanesque and Gothic Christian church architectural traditions.

Church architecture

churchecclesiastical architecturechurches
In churches, a transept is an area set crosswise to the nave in a cruciform ("cross-shaped") building within the Romanesque and Gothic Christian church architectural traditions.
The arms of the cross are called the transept.

Romanesque architecture

RomanesqueRomanesque styleLate Romanesque
In churches, a transept is an area set crosswise to the nave in a cruciform ("cross-shaped") building within the Romanesque and Gothic Christian church architectural traditions.
Domes in Romanesque architecture are generally found within crossing towers at the intersection of a church's nave and transept, which conceal the domes externally.

Salisbury Cathedral

SalisburycathedralCathedral Church of Salisbury
Upon its four piers, the crossing may support a spire (e.g., Salisbury Cathedral), a central tower (e.g., Gloucester Cathedral) or a crossing dome (e.g., St Paul's Cathedral).
As a result of the high water table on the new site, the cathedral was built on foundations only 4 ft deep, and by 1258 the nave, transepts, and choir were complete.

Chancel

presbyterychancel archsanctuary
The transept of a church separates the nave from the sanctuary, apse, choir, chevet, presbytery, or chancel.
In churches with a traditional Latin cross plan, and a transept and central crossing, the chancel usually begins at the eastern side of the central crossing, often under an extra-large chancel arch supporting the crossing and the roof.

Crossing (architecture)

crossingcrossing towertransept crossing
The transepts cross the nave at the crossing, which belongs equally to the main nave axis and to the transept.
In a typically oriented church (especially of Romanesque and Gothic styles), the crossing gives access to the nave on the west, the transept arms on the north and south, and the choir, as the first part of the chancel, on the east.

Apse

apsidalchevetchancel
The transept of a church separates the nave from the sanctuary, apse, choir, chevet, presbytery, or chancel.
The apse is separated from the main part of the church by the transept.

Gloucester Cathedral

GloucesterCathedralGloucester Abbey
Upon its four piers, the crossing may support a spire (e.g., Salisbury Cathedral), a central tower (e.g., Gloucester Cathedral) or a crossing dome (e.g., St Paul's Cathedral).
The south porch is in the Perpendicular style, with a fan-vaulted roof, as also is the north transept, the south being transitional Decorated Gothic.

St Paul's Cathedral

St. Paul's CathedralSt PaulSt Paul’s Cathedral
Upon its four piers, the crossing may support a spire (e.g., Salisbury Cathedral), a central tower (e.g., Gloucester Cathedral) or a crossing dome (e.g., St Paul's Cathedral).
Excavations by Francis Penrose in 1878 showed that it was 585 ft long and 100 ft wide (290 feet or 87 m across the transepts and crossing).

Beauvais Cathedral

BeauvaisCathedral of BeauvaisCathédrale Saint-Pierre de Beauvais
At Beauvais only the chevet and transepts stand; the nave of the cathedral was never completed after a collapse of the daring high vaulting in 1284.
It consists only of a transept (16th-century) and choir, with apse and seven polygonal apsidal chapels (13th-century), which are reached by an ambulatory.

Tracery

traceriedplate tracerytraceries
The north and south end walls often hold decorated windows of stained glass, such as rose windows, in stone tracery.
The rose windows of early- and high-Gothic cathedrals, such as the example in the north transept of Laon Cathedral (1170's) or the west facade at Chartres (c.

Basilica

basilicasminor basilicabasilican
Occasionally, the basilicas and the church and cathedral planning that descended from them were built without transepts; sometimes the transepts were reduced to matched chapels.
Its reception or audience hall is a long rectangular nave-like space, flanked by dependent rooms that mostly also open into one another, ending in a semi-circular apse, with matching transept spaces.

Dome

domesfalse domesaucer dome
Upon its four piers, the crossing may support a spire (e.g., Salisbury Cathedral), a central tower (e.g., Gloucester Cathedral) or a crossing dome (e.g., St Paul's Cathedral).
Domes in Romanesque architecture are generally found within crossing towers at the intersection of a church's nave and transept, which conceal the domes externally.

St. Vitus Cathedral

Prague CathedralSt Vitus CathedralSaint Vitus Cathedral
At St. Vitus Cathedral, Prague, only the choir and part of a southern transept were completed until a renewed building campaign in the 19th century.
Matthias designed the overall layout of the building as, basically, an import of French Gothic: a triple-naved basilica with flying buttresses, short transept, five-bayed choir and decagon apse with ambulatory and radiating chapels.

The Crystal Palace

Crystal PalaceCrystal Palace BowlCrystal Palace Company
The word "transept" is occasionally extended to mean any subsidiary corridor crossing a larger main corridor, such as the cross-halls or "transepts" of The Crystal Palace, London, of glass and iron that was built for the Great Exhibition of 1851.
He was even able to alter the design shortly before building began, adding a high, barrel-vaulted transept across the centre of the building, at 90 degrees to the main gallery, under which he was able to safely enclose several large elm trees that would otherwise have had to be felled—thereby also resolving a controversial issue that had been a major sticking point for the vocal anti-Exhibition lobby.

Rose window

wheel windowrose windowsrosette window
The north and south end walls often hold decorated windows of stained glass, such as rose windows, in stone tracery.
The next important development in its use for the Gothic style was to put it under a pointed arch, as was done in the Notre-Dame de Reims (after 1241), in the transepts as well as in the later roses of the facade.

Pershore Abbey

PershoreAbbot of PershoreChurch of the Holy Cross, Pershore
When churches have only one transept, as at Pershore Abbey, there is generally a historical disaster, fire, war or funding problem, to explain the anomaly.
When the north transept collapsed in 1686, a wall was built in its place.

Vault (architecture)

vaultvaultedvaults
At Beauvais only the chevet and transepts stand; the nave of the cathedral was never completed after a collapse of the daring high vaulting in 1284.
In England sexpartite vaults exist at Canterbury (1175) (set out by William of Sens), Rochester (1200), Lincoln (1215), Durham (east transept), and St. Faith's chapel, Westminster Abbey.

Cathedral

cathedralscathedral churchproto-cathedral
Occasionally, the basilicas and the church and cathedral planning that descended from them were built without transepts; sometimes the transepts were reduced to matched chapels.
The arms of the cross are called the transepts and often contain a number of chapels.

Architecture of cathedrals and great churches

Cathedral architecturecathedralsbasilica
The arms of the cross are called the transept.

Aisle

aislesside aisleaisled
Occasionally aisles stop at the transepts, but often aisles can be continued around the apse.