Transversus thoracis muscle

transversus thoracis
The transversus thoracis muscle lies internal to the thoracic cage, anteriorly.wikipedia
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Costal cartilage

costal cartilagesrib cartilageanterior costal cartilage grafts
It arises on either side from the lower third of the posterior surface of the body of the sternum, from the posterior surface of the xiphoid process, and from the sternal ends of the costal cartilages of the lower three or four true ribs.
The posterior surface is concave, and directed backward and downward; that of the first gives attachment to the sternothyroideus, those of the third to the sixth inclusive to the transversus thoracis muscle, and the six or seven inferior ones to the transversus abdominis muscle and the diaphragm.

Sternum

manubriumbreastbonesternal
It arises on either side from the lower third of the posterior surface of the body of the sternum, from the posterior surface of the xiphoid process, and from the sternal ends of the costal cartilages of the lower three or four true ribs.
The posterior surface, slightly concave, is also marked by three transverse lines, less distinct, however, than those in front; from its lower part, on either side, the transversus thoracis takes origin.

Intercostal nerves

intercostal nerveintercostalthird intercostal
Near the sternum, they cross in front of the internal mammary artery and transversus thoracis muscle, pierce the intercostales interni, the anterior intercostal membranes, and pectoralis major, and supply the integument of the front of the thorax and over the mamma, forming the anterior cutaneous branches of the thorax; the branch from the second nerve unites with the anterior supraclavicular nerves of the cervical plexus.

Rib cage

ribsribcagefirst rib
The transversus thoracis muscle lies internal to the thoracic cage, anteriorly.
The transversus thoracis muscle is innervated by one of the intercostal nerves and superiorly attaches at the posterior surface of the lower sternum.

Subcostalis muscle

Subcostalessubcostal muscles
It is in the same layer as the subcostal muscles and the innermost intercostal muscles.

Innermost intercostal muscle

innermostinnermost intercostal
It is in the same layer as the subcostal muscles and the innermost intercostal muscles.

Xiphoid process

xiphisternumxiphoid cartilagexiphosternal junction
It arises on either side from the lower third of the posterior surface of the body of the sternum, from the posterior surface of the xiphoid process, and from the sternal ends of the costal cartilages of the lower three or four true ribs.

Transverse abdominal muscle

transversus abdoministransversus abdominis muscletransverse abdominis
The lowest fibers of this muscle are horizontal in their direction, and are continuous with those of the transversus abdominis; the intermediate fibers are oblique, while the highest are almost vertical.

Intermediate fibers

The lowest fibers of this muscle are horizontal in their direction, and are continuous with those of the transversus abdominis; the intermediate fibers are oblique, while the highest are almost vertical.

Spinal nerve

spinal nervescervical nervessacral nerves
The muscle is supplied by the anterior rami of the thoracic spinal nerves (intercostal nerves).

Pulmonary pleurae

pleuraparietal pleuravisceral pleura
It is almost completely without function, but it separates the thoracic cage from the parietal pleura.

Intercostal arteries

Posterior intercostal arteriesposterior intercostal arterymusculophrenic artery

Mediastinum

mediastinalposterior mediastinumanterior mediastinum

Muscles of respiration

respiratory musclesaccessory muscles of respirationmuscle of respiration
Apart from the above neck muscles, the following muscles have also been observed contributing to respiration: serratus anterior, pectoralis major and pectoralis minor, trapezius, latissimus dorsi, erector spinae, iliocostalis lumborum, quadratus lumborum, serratus posterior superior, serratus posterior inferior, levatores costarum, transversus thoracis, subclavius (Kendall et al., 2005).

Intercostal space

intercostal spaces
In reference to the muscles of the thoracic wall, the intercostal nerves and vessels run just behind the internal intercostal muscles: therefore, they are generally covered on the inside by the parietal pleura, except when they are covered by the innermost intercostal muscles, innermost intercostal membrane, subcostal muscles or the transversus thoracis muscle.