Treason Act 1351

high treasonStatute of TreasonsTreason Act of 1351Act of Edward III from 1351counterfeiting coinsfrom 1352statuteStatute of Treasons of 1351the present lawTreason Act
The Treason Act 1351 is an Act of the Parliament of England which codified and curtailed the common law offence of treason.wikipedia
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Hanged, drawn and quartered

hanged, drawn, and quarteredhanging, drawing and quarteringdrawing and quartering
The practical distinction was the consequence of being convicted: for a high treason, the penalty was death by hanging, drawing and quartering (for a man) or drawing and burning (for a woman), and the traitor's property would escheat to the Crown; in the case of a petty treason the penalty was drawing and hanging without quartering, or burning without drawing; and property escheated only to the traitor's immediate lord.
To be hanged, drawn and quartered was, from 1352, a statutory penalty in England for men convicted of high treason, although the ritual was first recorded during the reign of King Henry III (1216–1272).

Treason

high treasontraitortraitors
The Treason Act 1351 is an Act of the Parliament of England which codified and curtailed the common law offence of treason. The Act distinguished two varieties of treason: high treason and petty treason (or petit treason), the first being disloyalty to the Sovereign, and the second being disloyalty to a subject.
The Treason Act 1351, the Treason Act 1795 and the Treason Act 1817 form part of the law of New South Wales.

Burning of women in England

burned at the stakeburningburning at the stake
The practical distinction was the consequence of being convicted: for a high treason, the penalty was death by hanging, drawing and quartering (for a man) or drawing and burning (for a woman), and the traitor's property would escheat to the Crown; in the case of a petty treason the penalty was drawing and hanging without quartering, or burning without drawing; and property escheated only to the traitor's immediate lord.
High treason, defined as transgressions against the sovereign, was first codified during King Edward III's reign by the Treason Act 1351.

Petty treason

The Act distinguished two varieties of treason: high treason and petty treason (or petit treason), the first being disloyalty to the Sovereign, and the second being disloyalty to a subject.
The common law offence was codified in the Treason Act 1351.

Edward III of England

Edward IIIKing Edward IIIKing Edward III of England
The Act was passed at Westminster in the Hilary term of 1351, in the 25th year of the reign of Edward III and was entitled "A Declaration which Offences shall be adjudged Treason".
Other legislation of importance includes the Treason Act 1351.

Constructive treason

constructive tfurther forms of treason would arise
The Act originally envisaged that further forms of treason would arise that would not be covered by the Act, so it legislated for this possibility.
For example, the English Treason Act 1351 declares it to be treason "When a Man doth compass or imagine the Death of our Lord the King."

Justice in eyre

Justices in EyreChief Justice in Eyre South of TrentJustice in Eyre south of Trent
However, they were "justices in eyre" in the Treason Act 1351 (under which it was high treason to kill them in the execution of their office).

Article Three of the United States Constitution

Article IIIU.S. Const. art. IIIArticle III of the United States Constitution
The Act is the origin of the definition of treason in the United States (in Article III of the Constitution).
The two forms of treason adopted were both derived from the English Treason Act 1351.

Forgery Act 1830

This section replaced the corresponding provisions in the Treason Act 1351 and the 1 Mary Stat 2 c 6.

Louis Riel

RielexecutionRiel Rebellions
* Métis leader and rebel, Louis Riel was convicted under this Act and hanged in Canada in 1885.
It ended in his arrest and conviction for high treason.

Lord Chancellor

Lord High Chancellor of Great BritainLord Chancellor of EnglandChancellor
The importance of the office is reflected by the Treason Act 1351, which makes it high treason to slay the Lord Chancellor.

High treason in the United Kingdom

high treasontreasondisloyalty
Under the Treason Act 1351, or "Statute of Treasons", which distinguished between high and petty treason, several distinct offences constitute high treason; most of them continue to do so, while those relating to forgery have been relegated to ordinary offences.

Succession to the Crown Act 2013

Succession to the Crown Bill 2012Succession to the Crown BillSuccession to the Crown Act
As the monarch's eldest son will no longer automatically be heir apparent, the Treason Act 1351 was also amended, so that encompassing the death of the monarch's eldest son is now extended to murdering the heir apparent, whatever the sex.

Treason Act 1695

1695 Treason ActTreason Act (1696)
) When in 2000 a British newspaper suggested that James Hewitt be prosecuted under the Treason Act 1351 for an alleged affair with Diana, Princess of Wales, it was pointed out that the mooted evidence fell outside the time limit.

Lord High Treasurer

Lord TreasurerTreasurerTreasurer of England
Under the Treason Act 1351 it was treason to kill him.

Roger Casement

Sir Roger Casementabuse of the indigenous tribes in the Putumayo regionAbuses against the Putumayo Indians
During the trial of Roger Casement, who in 1916 was accused of collaborating with Germany during World War I, the defence argued that the Act applied only to activities carried out on British soil, while Casement had committed the acts of collaboration outside Britain.
Casement's crimes had been carried out in Germany and the Treason Act 1351 seemed to apply only to activities carried out on English (or arguably British) soil.

Act of Parliament

ActActs of ParliamentActs
The Treason Act 1351 is an Act of the Parliament of England which codified and curtailed the common law offence of treason.

Parliament of England

ParliamentEnglish Parliamentmember of Parliament
The Treason Act 1351 is an Act of the Parliament of England which codified and curtailed the common law offence of treason.

Statute

statutorystatutesAct
It is one of the earliest English statutes still in force, although it has been very significantly amended.

Palace of Westminster

Houses of ParliamentWestminster HallWestminster
The Act was passed at Westminster in the Hilary term of 1351, in the 25th year of the reign of Edward III and was entitled "A Declaration which Offences shall be adjudged Treason".

Hilary term

HilaryHillarysecond term (Hilary)
The Act was passed at Westminster in the Hilary term of 1351, in the 25th year of the reign of Edward III and was entitled "A Declaration which Offences shall be adjudged Treason".

Common law

common-lawcourts of common lawcommon
It was passed to clarify precisely what was treason, as the definition under common law had been expanded rapidly by the courts until its scope was controversially wide.

William Joyce

Lord Haw-HawGerman stationsHerr Joyce
The Act was last used to prosecute William Joyce in 1945 for collaborating with Germany in World War II.

World War II

Second World WarwarWWII
The Act was last used to prosecute William Joyce in 1945 for collaborating with Germany in World War II.