Treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek

Dancing Rabbit CreekagreedDancing Rabbit
The Treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek was a treaty signed on September 27, 1830, and proclaimed on February 24, 1831, between the Choctaw American Indian tribe and the United States Government.wikipedia
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Choctaw

Choctaw IndiansChoctawsChoctaw people
The Treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek was a treaty signed on September 27, 1830, and proclaimed on February 24, 1831, between the Choctaw American Indian tribe and the United States Government.
By the 1831 Treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek, those Choctaw who chose to stay in the newly formed state of Mississippi were to be considered state and U.S. citizens.

Greenwood LeFlore

Greenwood LeFlore
The principal Choctaw negotiators were Chief Greenwood LeFlore, Musholatubbee, and Nittucachee; the U.S. negotiators were Colonel John Coffee and Secretary of War John Eaton.
In 1830 LeFlore led other chiefs in signing the Treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek, which ceded the remaining Choctaw lands in Mississippi to the US government and agreed to removal to Indian Territory.

Indian removal

removalremovedremove
This was the first removal treaty carried into effect under the Indian Removal Act.
On September 27, 1830, the Choctaw signed the Treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek and by concession, became the first Native American tribe to be removed.

Mississippi

MSState of MississippiGeography of Mississippi
The treaty ceded about 11 million acres (45,000 km 2 ) of the Choctaw Nation in what is now Mississippi in exchange for about 15 million acres (61,000 km 2 ) in the Indian territory, now the state of Oklahoma.
On September 27, 1830, the Treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek was signed between the U.S. Government and the Choctaw.

Mushulatubbee

MosholatubbeeMoshulatubbeeMusholatubbee
The principal Choctaw negotiators were Chief Greenwood LeFlore, Musholatubbee, and Nittucachee; the U.S. negotiators were Colonel John Coffee and Secretary of War John Eaton.
On 26 September 1830, together with the Principal Chief Greenwood LeFlore and others, Mushulatubbee signed the Treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek, which ceded to the US government most of the remaining Choctaw territory in Mississippi and Alabama in exchange for territory in Indian Territory.

John Coffee

General John CoffeeJohn R. Coffee
The principal Choctaw negotiators were Chief Greenwood LeFlore, Musholatubbee, and Nittucachee; the U.S. negotiators were Colonel John Coffee and Secretary of War John Eaton.
Coffee negotiated the Treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek of 1830 with the Choctaw by which they ceded their lands, and started negotiations with the Chickasaw, but they did not conclude a treaty until after his death.

Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians

Mississippi ChoctawMississippi Band of Choctaw Indians, MississippiChoctaw
The Choctaw at this crucial time became two distinct groups: the Nation in Oklahoma and the Tribe in Mississippi.
The chiefs signed the Treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek with the United States, which was ratified by the U.S. Senate on February 25, 1831.

Indian Removal Act

Indian Removal Act of 1830Indian removalAmerican Indian Removal Policies
This was the first removal treaty carried into effect under the Indian Removal Act.
The first removal treaty signed was the Treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek on September 27, 1830, in which Choctaws in Mississippi ceded land east of the river in exchange for payment and land in the West.

Andrew Jackson

JacksonJacksonianPresident Andrew Jackson
On August 25, 1830, the Choctaw were supposed to meet with Andrew Jackson in Franklin, Tennessee, but Greenwood Leflore informed the Secretary of War, John H. Eaton, that the chiefs were fiercely opposed to attending.
The tactics worked, and the chiefs agreed to move.

Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma

Choctaw NationChoctawChoctaw OTSA
The Choctaw at this crucial time became two distinct groups: the Nation in Oklahoma and the Tribe in Mississippi.
On September 27, 1830, the Treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek was signed.

John Eaton (politician)

John EatonJohn H. EatonJohn Henry Eaton
The principal Choctaw negotiators were Chief Greenwood LeFlore, Musholatubbee, and Nittucachee; the U.S. negotiators were Colonel John Coffee and Secretary of War John Eaton. On August 25, 1830, the Choctaw were supposed to meet with Andrew Jackson in Franklin, Tennessee, but Greenwood Leflore informed the Secretary of War, John H. Eaton, that the chiefs were fiercely opposed to attending.
Their tactics typically worked, and the chiefs signed the Treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek, agreeing to move west.

List of Choctaw treaties

Choctaw signed a series of treatiestreatiesTreaty with the Choctaw
The Treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek required the Choctaws to sign away the remaining traditional homeland to the United States.

Indian Territory

Indian TerritoriesIndianIndian Country
The treaty ceded about 11 million acres (45,000 km 2 ) of the Choctaw Nation in what is now Mississippi in exchange for about 15 million acres (61,000 km 2 ) in the Indian territory, now the state of Oklahoma.

Treaty of Doak's Stand

Doak's Stand
This article would later influence Article XIV in the 1830 Treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek.

List of treaties

declaration of friendship and co-operationtreatiestreaty

Treaty

treatiesinternational treatyinternational treaties
The Treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek was a treaty signed on September 27, 1830, and proclaimed on February 24, 1831, between the Choctaw American Indian tribe and the United States Government.

Native Americans in the United States

Native AmericanNative AmericansAmerican Indian
The Treaty of Dancing Rabbit Creek was a treaty signed on September 27, 1830, and proclaimed on February 24, 1831, between the Choctaw American Indian tribe and the United States Government.

Oklahoma

OKState of OklahomaOklahoma, USA
The treaty ceded about 11 million acres (45,000 km 2 ) of the Choctaw Nation in what is now Mississippi in exchange for about 15 million acres (61,000 km 2 ) in the Indian territory, now the state of Oklahoma.

United States Secretary of War

Secretary of WarU.S. Secretary of WarUS Secretary of War
The principal Choctaw negotiators were Chief Greenwood LeFlore, Musholatubbee, and Nittucachee; the U.S. negotiators were Colonel John Coffee and Secretary of War John Eaton.